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Diabetes Diet - Gestational

Diabetes Diet - Gestational

For a balanced diet, you need to eat a variety of healthy foods. Reading food labels can help you make healthy choices when you shop. If you are a vegetarian or on a special diet, talk with your health care provider to make sure you're getting a balanced diet. In general, you should eat: Plenty of whole fruits and vegetables Moderate amounts of lean proteins and healthy fats Moderate amounts of whole grains, such as bread, cereal, pasta, and rice, plus starchy vegetables, such as corn and peas Fewer foods that have a lot of sugar, such as soft drinks, fruit juices, and pastries You should eat three small- to moderate-sized meals and one or more snacks each day. Do not skip meals and snacks. Keep the amount and types of food (carbohydrates, fats, and proteins) the same from day to day. This can help you keep your blood sugar stable. CARBOHYDRATES Less than half the calories you eat should come from carbohydrates. Most carbohydrates are found in starchy or sugary foods. They include bread, rice, pasta, cereal, potatoes, peas, corn, fruit, fruit juice, milk, yogurt, cookies, candy, soda, and other sweets. High-fiber, whole-grain carbohydrates are healthy choices. Vegetables are good for your health and your blood sugar. Enjoy lots of them. Carbohydrates in food are measured in grams. You can learn to count the amount of carbohydrates in the foods that you eat. GRAINS, BEANS, AND STARCHY VEGETABLES Eat 6 or more servings a day. One serving equals: 1 slice bread 1 ounce (28 grams) ready-to-eat cereal 1/2 cup (105 grams) cooked rice or pasta 1 English muffin Choose foods loaded with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and healthy carbohydrates. They include: Whole-grain breads and crackers Whole grain cereals Whole grains, such as barley or oats Beans Brown or wild rice Whole-wheat pa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Super Foods

Diabetes Super Foods

Eating right is key to managing diabetes. Fortunately, your food “prescription” includes filling, flavorful fare that tastes like anything but medicine. A diet rich in these 10 “super foods” will help minimize blood sugar and even throw your disease into reverse. Dig in! 1. Vegetables. The advantages of eating more vegetables are undeniable. Packed with powerhouse nutrients, vegetables are naturally low in calories, and they’re full of fiber, so they’re plenty filling. Loading your plate with more vegetables will automatically mean you’re eating fewer simple carbs (which raise blood sugar) and saturated fats (which increase insulin resistance). Aim to get four or five servings a day. (A serving is 1/2 cup canned or cooked vegetables or 1 cup raw vegetables.) Go easier on starchy vegetables — including potatoes and corn, and legumes such as lima beans and peas — which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 2. Fruit. It has more natural sugar and calories than most vegetables, so you can’t eat it with utter abandon, but fruit has almost all the advantages that vegetables do — it’s brimming with nutrients you need, it’s low in fat, it’s high in fiber, and it’s relatively low in calories compared with most other foods. Best of all, it’s loaded with antioxidants that help protect your nerves, your eyes, and your heart. Aim to get three or four servings a day. (A serving is one piece of whole fruit, 1/2 cup cooked or canned fruit, or 1 cup raw fruit.) Strive to make most of your fruit servings real produce, not juice. Many of the nutrients and a lot of the fiber found in the skin, flesh, and seeds of fruit are eliminated during juicing, and the calories and sugar are concentrated in juice. 3. Beans. Beans are just about your best source Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: What It Means For You And Your Baby

Gestational Diabetes: What It Means For You And Your Baby

Gestational diabetes: What it means for you and your baby Is diabetes during pregnancy caused by eating sweets? Kaye Foster-Powell explores the causes behind gestational diabetes and how it can be managed. Gestational diabetes (GD) is the medical term given for diabetes first diagnosed during pregnancy. For many women it can be an upsetting diagnosis, but despite what many people think, it isn't caused by eating sweets. GD occurs in about five per cent of pregnancies but the incidence is increasing. In Pacific Island, Indian and Asian women the incidence may be as high as 10 per cent. A woman is more likely to develop GD if she has certain risk factors, but it can develop in a woman who has no risk factors. history of gestational diabetes or complicated pregnancy During pregnancy, hormonal changes occur in a woman's body to ensure a steady supply of glucose, as fuel, to the growing baby. One of the changes in the mother is the development of 'insulin resistance' which means her body doesn't take up glucose as readily as usual. This is thought to help channel glucose to the baby in preference to the mother. Women with GD have a greater severity of insulin resistance than that seen in normal pregnancies and are unable to produce enough insulin to control their own blood glucose levels. Consequently, their blood glucose levels rise above the normal range for pregnancy. Gestational diabetes has health implications for a mother and her baby. One of the most widely recognised health implications is the risk of the baby growing too fat during pregnancy which can lead to complications in delivery. Untreated GD puts the baby at risk of growing disproportionately fat while in utero and suffering breathing difficulty, jaundice and low blood glucose (hypoglycaemia) at birth. It al Continue reading >>

Pregnant: New To Gd - Breakfast!?!

Pregnant: New To Gd - Breakfast!?!

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was diagnosed last week with GD, I am 22+4. So far I have been managing well, but am struggling with breakfast cereals. I don't have time in the morning to cook myself things like eggs on toast etc, as I'm out early. I've tried Bran flakes and Crunchy bran which both give me post readings of between 8.4-8.6, I had toast and marmite which gave me a reading of 7.9. Tomorrow I plan on trying porridge, to see if it makes a difference. I was wondering if anyone had found a cereal that works for them. I was diagnosed last week with GD, I am 22+4. So far I have been managing well, but am struggling with breakfast cereals. I don't have time in the morning to cook myself things like eggs on toast etc, as I'm out early. I've tried Bran flakes and Crunchy bran which both give me post readings of between 8.4-8.6, I had toast and marmite which gave me a reading of 7.9. Tomorrow I plan on trying porridge, to see if it makes a difference. I was wondering if anyone had found a cereal that works for them. Welcome @Agentk76 and congratulations on your pregnancy Are you on any medication for the GD? Have you been given advice about diet? My husband has a nature Valley protein bar for breakfast. Doesn't increase his blood sugar, quick, easy and plenty of protein for growing babies! Please can people wait for the OP to confirm if they're on meds and if they've been given any dietary guidance. Balancing macro-nutrients during pregnancy is crucial and GD guidelines are usually tailored to the individual, including calorie requirements appropriate for pregnancy. Welcome @Agentk76 and congratulations on your pregnancy Are you on any medication for the GD? Have you been give Continue reading >>

What Cereals And Grains Might Be Part Of A Gestational Diabetes Diet?

What Cereals And Grains Might Be Part Of A Gestational Diabetes Diet?

Cereals and grains can definitely be part of your gestational diabetes eating plan. Cereals and grains are considered to be starchy foods, which are types of carbohydrate. Carbohydrate provides energy for the body, as well as other important nutrients, including many vitamins and minerals. The key is to choose healthy, whole grain forms of these carbs. Doing so will give you more nutrition, including fiber, and can also help limit spikes in blood glucose after eating a meal. Good choices include steel cut oats, bran cereals, whole grain bread, brown rice, and whole grain pasta. Refined or "white" grain foods, like white rice, white pasta and white bread are highly processed. This means that many of the beneficial nutrients have been stripped away. Also, refined foods have a higher glycemic effect, meaning that you may notice more of a spike, or increase in your blood glucose after eating them (and the goal is to limit the spikes!). Remember, though, that all carbohydrate foods need to be counted in your eating plan. One carb choice or serving is 1 slice of bread, 3/4 cup cold cereal, 1/2 cup cooked cereal, or 1/3 cup cooked rice or pasta. A dietitian can help you figure out how many carb servings you should aim for at your meals and snacks each day. Continue reading >>

Can I Still Eat Cereal?

Can I Still Eat Cereal?

if I can what kind n brand and the right milk I'm suppose to drink Just try to stay in your carbohydrate range. I've heard that sometimes cereal can spike blood sugars, so add some peanut butter or have some protein. I've been able to tolerate special K protein with fairlife milk as a snack. The trick is that a serving size is 3/4 cup of cereal. When I normally pour a bowl it's at least double that so I have to measure. Honestly, no. I know there might be some exceptions in this group, but if you look at the carb content on most cereals, it's a very small serving first of all, so be aware they are kids sizes in most cases, and you have to eat a lot of protein to balance that. It's really pushing the carb content guidelines per meal. The cookie and cereal aisles are torture. My nutritionist recommended kashi organic honey toasted. It has 3G of protein and 5 g of sugar. You can try, but I forewarn you, be prepared for disappointment when you check your levels. I am really missing crunchy granola type cereals. I love them but just can't tolerate them at the moment unfortunately. Cereal is an absolute hard no for me until lunch time, and even then I can only have a SMALL bowl of completely basic special K flakes with some almond milk, and it has the carb content of a meal. Ive been able to eat special K protein cereal with normal numbers an hour after . 3/4 of a cup - 19g carbs 3g fiber 10g protein and 7g sugar . I think it really just depends on the person Cereal killed my blood sugars, it makes me so sad because I love cereal. As far as milk, Farilife as been as lifesaver for me! I do fine with Special K Protein cereal. Just try it out and see if any cereal works for you. Then youll know for sure and hopefully can find something that works well. I think it just depends b Continue reading >>

Breakfast Ideas For Someone With Gestational Diabetes

Breakfast Ideas For Someone With Gestational Diabetes

If you're pregnant or hope to become pregnant, you might be concerned about a possible complication -- gestational diabetes. This temporary condition develops when a woman's body becomes resistant to insulin produced by her pancreas, causing her blood-sugar levels to rise above healthy levels. It affects about 18 percent of pregnancies, according to the American Diabetes Association. Modifying your diet can help control gestational diabetes. Paying attention to breakfast -- the first meal of the day -- can start you off on a good eating plan. Check with your doctor or a registered dietitian for help developing the best diet for your pregnancy. Video of the Day Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, so carbohydrates have a direct impact on blood-sugar levels. Choosing the right types of carbs at breakfast helps your blood sugar rise slowly and steadily, without the spikes that require lots of insulin. The best choices are rich in fiber, which helps carbohydrates have a low-to-moderate effect on blood sugar. For example, a breakfast that includes a whole-grain cereal such as bran flakes or a whole-grain muffin, tends to raise blood sugar slowly. Oat bran is a good choice because of its high-fiber content, which also supports gastrointestinal health. Dairy products contain carbohydrates but still contribute to a healthy breakfast, when used in moderation. Add milk or yogurt to your breakfast, but the University of California Medical Center recommends consuming only 1 cup of dairy products at a time to keep blood sugar from spiking. Choose low-fat versions to manage your intake of saturated fat, which can contribute to high levels of blood cholesterol. If you use butter, spread it thinly or switch to a low-fat spread. Fresh fruit is generally a healthy food but i Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

If you have gestational diabetes, the chances of having problems with the pregnancy can be reduced by controlling your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You'll also need to be more closely monitored during pregnancy and labour to check if treatment is working and to check for any problems. Checking your blood sugar level You'll be given a testing kit that you can use to check your blood sugar level. This involves using a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. You'll be advised: how to test your blood sugar level correctly when and how often to test your blood sugar – most women with gestational diabetes are advised to test before breakfast and one hour after each meal what level you should be aiming for – this will be a measurement given in millimoles of glucose per litre of blood (mmol/l) Diabetes UK has more information about monitoring your glucose levels. Diet Making changes to your diet can help control your blood sugar level. You should be offered a referral to a dietitian, who can give you advice about your diet, and you may be given a leaflet to help you plan your meals. You may be advised to: eat regularly – usually three meals a day – and avoid skipping meals eat starchy and low glycaemic index (GI) foods that release sugar slowly – such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice, granary bread, all-bran cereals, pulses, beans, lentils, muesli and porridge eat plenty of fruit and vegetables – aim for at least five portions a day avoid sugary foods – you don't need a completely sugar-free diet, but try to swap snacks such as cakes and biscuits for healthier alternatives such as fruit, nuts and seeds avoid sugary drinks – sugar-free or diet drinks are better than sugary versions; be aware that fruit juices and smoothies contain s Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereal Aka 'gd Kryptonite'!

Breakfast Cereal Aka 'gd Kryptonite'!

The majority of dietitians and hospital dietary info. will suggest a suitable diabetic breakfast being breakfast cereal such as Weetabix, Bran flakes, All Bran, Shreddies, Shredded Wheat, Granola, No added sugar Muesli, or porridge oats. High fibre and low in fat, covered with a helping of lactose (milk) and sometimes they like to advise to add a helping of fructose (fruit) on top too.... so a high carb cereal covered in carbs and more carbs. Carb overload! We have learnt through experience that it is very rare for ladies to be able to tolerate these cereals throughout a pregnancy when diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Many will be able to tolerate them earlier in pregnancy, when insulin resistance has not yet peaked. Then as the pregnancy progresses and insulin resistance increases, overnight, a cereal which was once tolerated often raises levels very high (spikes), usually into double figures, hence we named breakfast cereal GD kryptonite! Sometimes ladies are able to move onto things like porridge oats which are low GI, but for many all cereals become an intolerable food which has to be forgotten until baby is born. For this reason, cereal becomes a craving food for many ladies with gestational diabetes. We see many ladies being told that they should be able to tolerate cereal and that they should continue to try and ultimately this results in them being medicated, or doses of medication or insulin being increased in order to control the sugar hit from the cereals. If it's not broken then you don't need to fix it! If breakfast cereal works for you then that's great. Don't stop eating it if it is not causing you any problems, but eat it in the knowledge that tolerance to it can change (literally overnight) and please be careful if advising others with gestational d Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereals

Breakfast Cereals

What's in your bowl? Often hailed as the 'most important meal of the day', a decent breakfast certainly has a range of health benefits. As well as providing nutrients, if you have diabetes, a regular healthy breakfast can help to maintain control of blood sugar, can minimise unhealthy snacking later on, and fuels your body to help you function ahead of a busy day. The breakfast of champions When it comes to breakfast time, cereal remains a popular, convenient, and speedy choice. With the choice on supermarket shelves growing over the years, it can be tricky to choose the healthiest option. To make things easier, we have chosen 10 well-known cereals and looked closely at the nutritional value to see how they perform in terms of sugar, fat, and fibre. But first, let's find out a little more about what we should be on the look out for... What's in a cereal? Breakfast cereals tend to be based on grains - some are wholegrains (such as wheat, bran, oats), and others are refined grains (such as maize and rice). Many also have nuts, seeds and dried fruit added to them. Wholegrain cereals can help to manage blood glucose levels, particularly if you have type 2 diabetes, as they release glucose more slowly as they are low GI. Recent guidelines highlighted that, as a UK population, we are having too much sugar and not enough fibre. Fibre is important for gut health and some can help towards lowering cholesterol. Some cereals also contain vitamins and minerals such as iron, vitamin D, and B vitamins such as folic acid. Folic acid is important for healthy red blood cells and also needs to be taken as a supplement both before, and during, pregnancy to reduce the risk of neural tube defects in unborn babies. Folic acid is especially important in pregnant women with diabetes as they ne Continue reading >>

Eating Well

Eating Well

We hope that the following practical information on eating and staying well will help you feel positive and encouraged to stick to the gestational diabetes (GDM) diet. The GDM diet is basically a really healthy way of eating which can benefit the whole family. Read on for tips on everything from exercising, eating cake and dealing with hunger. Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator What about exercise? What’s the deal with carbs? So you’ve just found out that you need to manage your daily carbohydrate (carb) intake. This can be a little tricky. Carbs are now a problem for you but also the solution. You need carbs and your baby needs carbs. Carbohydrates are our energy food. They are contained in many important food groups i.e. bread and cereals, fruits, vegetables and dairy. You can’t just cut them out or your diet would end up unbalanced and insufficient but too much of them means too much glucose in your bloodstream. The answer is this. You need to eat a consistent and moderate amount of carbs regularly through the day. Timing: Ideally you should be eating every 2.5-3hrs. Leaving a much longer gap means you might get too hungry and want to eat more when you finally do eat. Eating every hour means your body is going to find it too hard to keep processing all the time. Try having 3 meals and 3 small snacks through the day. These should be at times of the day that suit you. Type & Amount: Choose nutritious or high-fibre carbs i.e. wholegrain breads and crackers, pasta, starchy vegetables such as corn and potato, legumes, low fat dairy milk and yoghurt and fruit. A fist-sized amount of carbohydrate is a good rule of thumb to go by until you see a dietitian. This is usually equal to about a standard cup measure (2 Continue reading >>

Cereal? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Cereal? - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

I LOVE cereal. I usually eat at least 2 bowls a day. I was eating Raisin Bran (it helps with other pregnancy symptoms like constipation) I was told last week to start keeping an eye on my numbers because I failed my one hour. So an hour and a half ago I ate a bowl of raisin bran, then checked my sugar 30 minutes ago and it was 224! Does anybody know what kind of cereal won't make my number spike so high? Sorry, but I'm still very new to this. Look for whole wheat varieties (shredded wheat, perhaps?) and watch the portion size (read the nutrition label on the box for portion size and the amount of total carbs for that one portion). It's shocking how high of carbs a little bit of cereal is! Any type of "white" or sugary cereal will spike your blood sugar fast. You have to actually measure the cereal with measuring cups and also take into consideration that milk has carbs in it too. Check the label on your milk. Look for "total carbs" and the portion size. Measured 1c of the 1% I have here is 12g carbs. It's crazy. Shoot for 30-45g total carbs in the morning and test again and see what happens. I just bought Kellogg's all bran cereal (honestly Looks like cat food lol) but tastes ok! just pour just the serving size and instead of a cup, do half a cup of milk! I kno it stinks and you'll feel "hungry" but it's a total diet/lifestyle change...I'm on week 4 and realistically it doesn't get easier but you will be happy with how your body looks after lol I feel tighter ! I couldn't do any cereal in the morning. I was only allowed 15g of carbs and that's almost a cup of milk :( That was one of my indulgences after my son was born. Good luck! I was able to eat cereal with more protien like eggs and sausage. When I are just cereal my numbers were not that high though. I've had to g Continue reading >>

Best Cold Cereal Brands For Diabetes

Best Cold Cereal Brands For Diabetes

By:Jessie Shafer and Elizabeth Burt, R.D., L.D. | Diabetic Living Magazine Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. With options ranging from colorful sugar bombs to bland fiber buds, cold cereal choices may seem either tasty-but-bad-for-you or boring-but-healthful. We're here to show you there's a happy medium for your breakfast bowl! Through a series of dietitian approvals for nutritional requirements and taste tests with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, we narrowed 70 qualifying cereals down to six winners and 12 tasty finalists. These "best of the bowl" cereals were awarded our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Pour one to taste how yummy healthful options can be! Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Every cereal tested had to meet these health requirements per serving (without milk): -- Less than 30 percent of calories from fat After analyzing the nutrition content of hundreds of cereals, we were surprised to find some brands that were previously thought to be too high in sugar and calories that actually qualified for our taste test. Kellogg's Frosted Flakes was one such example. Its new formula for a reduced-sugar cereal with added fiber makes it one of several healthful options. Kellogg's Frosted Flakes with Fiber, Less Sugar Per serving (3/4 cup): 110 cal., 0 g total fat, 0 mg chol., 160 mg sodium, 26 g carb. (3 g fiber, 8 g sugars), 2 g pro. Per serving (3/4 cup): 120 Continue reading >>

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

When you’re in a morning rush, you may not have time to eat anything but a quick bowl of cereal. But many brands of breakfast cereal are loaded with fast-digesting carbohydrates. These carbs usually rate high on the glycemic index. That means your body quickly breaks them down, which rapidly raises your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, that can be dangerous. Fortunately, not all cereals are made the same. Read on to learn about diabetes-friendly cereal options that can get you out of the door quickly, without putting you through a blood sugar rollercoaster ride. We’ve listed our recommendations from the highest rating on the glycemic index to the lowest rating. The glycemic index, or GI, measures how quickly carbohydrates raise your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, it’s best to choose foods with lower GI ratings. They take longer to digest, which can help prevent spikes in your blood sugar. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: low-GI foods have a rating of 55 or less medium-GI foods have a rating of 56-69 high-GI foods have a rating of 70-100 Mixing foods can influence how they digest and adsorb into your blood, and ultimately their GI rating. For example, eating high-ranked GI cereal with Greek yogurt, nuts, or other low-ranked GI foods can slow your digestion and limit spikes in your blood sugar. Glycemic load is another measure of how food affects your blood sugar. It takes into account portion size and the digestibility of different carbohydrates. It may be a better way to identify good and bad carb choices. For example, carrots have a high GI rating but a low glycemic load. The vegetable provides a healthy choice for people with diabetes. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: a glycemic load under 10 is low a glycemi Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Gestational Diabetes

Healthy Eating For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes (GDM) occurs when glucose levels in the blood are higher than usual during pregnancy. This can put the health of you and your baby at risk. Healthy eating specific for GDM can help achieve good blood glucose control and healthy weight gain for mother and baby during pregnancy. Carbohydrates ï‚· Carbohydrate is found in a variety of food and drink and provides the body with fuel (energy) ï‚· Many foods containing carbohydrate also provide fibre, vitamins and minerals ï‚· Carbohydrate breaks down into glucose during digestion and is absorbed into the blood stream ï‚· The type and quantity of carbohydrate you eat will affect your blood glucose levels Which Foods Contain Carbohydrates? Healthy Carbohydrate Choices Less Healthy Carbohydrate Choices  Wholegrain Bread  Wholegrain Breakfast Cereal  Grains e.g. Barley, Quinoa  Pasta, Noodles  Rice  Wholegrain & Wholemeal Flour  Lentils and Legumes  Starchy Vegetables - Potato, Sweet Potato, Corn  Fruit  Milk, Yoghurt ï¶ Biscuits ï¶ Cakes, Pastry ï¶ Sugar, Jam ï¶ Honey, Maple Syrup ï¶ Chocolate, Confectionary ï¶ Regular Soft Drink, Cordial ï¶ Fruit Juice ï¶ Potato Crisps, Corn Chips ï¶ Ice-cream, Custard Glycaemic Index Glycaemic Index (GI) is a measure of how quickly or slowly a carbohydrate food is digested and increases blood glucose levels. Higher GI Carbohydrates Increase blood glucose levels more quickly Choose these less often Lower GI Carbohydrates Increase blood glucose levels more slowly These are the preferred choice Summary of Lower and Higher Glycaemic Index Choices Remember that both the GI and the quantity of carbohydrate foods consumed will affect your blood glucose levels. Lower GI choices are prefer Continue reading >>

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