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Ala And Diabetes

Diabetes, Type 2

Diabetes, Type 2

What is type 2 diabetes? Also called adult-onset diabetes, type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder resulting from the body’s inability to properly use or ultimately make enough insulin, the hormone that helps regulate sugar, starches and other foods the body uses for energy. It is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of all cases. Type 2 diabetes is nearing epidemic proportions in the United States as a result of a greater prevalence of obesity and sedentary lifestyles. The upswing is also due to the increasing number of older people in the population. What are the symptoms? Many symptoms of diabetes such as excessive thirst or irritability, can seem unimportant, which is one of the reasons why the disease often goes undiagnosed. However, early detection is very important because it can reduce the odds of developing the dangerous complications of diabetes. Common symptoms include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Unusual weight loss Increased fatigue Irritability Blurry vision If high blood sugar levels are not brought under control via treatment type 2 diabetes (and type 1 diabetes as well) can lead to a number of serious complications: Eye damage: People with diabetes have a 40 percent higher than normal risk of developing glaucoma, increased pressure within the eye that can lead to vision loss. They are also 60 percent more likely than normal to develop cataracts, which cloud the lens of the eye, blocking light and blurring vision. They are also at risk of diabetic retinopathy, damage to the retina that is the leading cause of impaired vision in the United States. High blood pressure: This disorder occurs at twice the normal rate among diabetics. Heart disease: Deaths from heart disease among diabetics are two to four Continue reading >>

The Emerging Role Of Alpha-lipoic Acid For Diabetic Neuropathy

The Emerging Role Of Alpha-lipoic Acid For Diabetic Neuropathy

Neuropathy is a common and well-known complication of chronic hyperglycemia due to diabetes mellitus. Distal symmetric polyneuropathy, a form frequently affecting patients with diabetes, characteristically begins in the toes and traverses proximally in symmetric fashion. Symptoms of this late complication include loss of sensation, vibration sense, temperature sensation and muscle weakness. Often, these patients will describe hot, burning, tingling or throbbing pain that accompanies these symptoms. Those with distal symmetric polyneuropathy also have nighttime pain, which imposes a substantially detrimental effect on their quality of life.1 Researchers have also found increasing age, obesity and peripheral arterial disease to be risk factors for the eventual development of neuropathy.2 There are several strategies for alleviating neuropathic pain. Current mainstays include providing symptomatic treatment with anticonvulsants, such as pregabalin (Lyrica, Pfizer) and gabapentin (Neurontin, Pfizer), or tricyclic antidepressants. However, these medications merely relieve the symptoms and do not alter the actual pathogenetic mechanism of the disease. Furthermore, these medications are associated with adverse effects and contraindications that limit the utility of these drugs.3 Medications that modify disease progression by addressing the underlying cause of symptoms would be useful in providing long-term care for our patients, ideally without side effects. Oxidative stress and free radical generation are deeply implicated in the development of late diabetic complications. Host antioxidant defenses act to reduce reactive oxygen species that oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria normally produce. Excessive glucose metabolism increases production of these free radicals Continue reading >>

Alpha-lipoic Acid (ala) And Diabetes

Alpha-lipoic Acid (ala) And Diabetes

Exciting new research! Science has linked alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) to increasing our mitochondrial energy production and helping prevent diabetes. At first, medical researchers initially classified alpha-lipoic acid as a new vitamin but then recognized it as an essential coenzyme. Then, they found that alpha-lipoic acid was a powerful biological antioxidant, quenching free radicals, as well as coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and vitamins C and E.. Researchers also found that alpha-lipoic acid is unique in being the only antioxidant known to work in both fat and water-soluble tissues. (Vitamin C only works in watery tissues and vitamin E is restricted to fatty tissues.) Antioxidants are known to play a vital role in preventing many of the health disorders associated with aging, including degenerative diseases such as diabetes. Now, a vitamin-like substance known as alpha-lipoic acid is now at the forefront of antioxidant research. This dual ability allows alpha-lipoic acid to easily neutralize free radicals in both interior and exterior cellular structures. Now, it is called the “universal antioxidant.” More importantly, ALA recycles vitamins C, E, CoQ10, and glutathione! This antioxidant could have far-reaching consequences in the search for prevention and therapy of diabetes. And, because it’s the only antioxidant that can easily get into the brain, it could be useful in preventing damage from a stroke! Nature Knows How to do Things! Continue reading >>

Alpha-lipoic Acid (ala) And Diabetic Neuropathy

Alpha-lipoic Acid (ala) And Diabetic Neuropathy

Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is a possible alternative remedy to treat the pain associated with diabetic polyneuropathy. Neuropathy, or nerve damage, is a common and potentially serious complication of diabetes. Nerve damage is permanent, and its symptoms can be difficult to alleviate. Polyneuropathy involves the peripheral nerves of the body. It’s the most common form of neuropathy in people who have diabetes, and it causes foot and leg pain. ALA is also called lipoic acid. It’s an antioxidant found in trace amounts in some foods including: liver red meat broccoli brewer’s yeast spinach The body also makes it in small amounts. Experts think antioxidants protect against cell damage. ALA helps fight free radicals, which are the substances that cause cell damage. ALA may also help the body be more sensitive to insulin. People with diabetes might use ALA in supplemental form to help neuropathy. This supplement is promising, but you should still address risks and certain questions before you take ALA. Neuropathy can develop in people with diabetes as a result of high blood glucose, or hyperglycemia. People with diabetes are at a high risk of nerve damage when blood glucose levels are poorly controlled over many years. Your symptoms may vary depending on the type of neuropathy you have and which nerves are affected. Diabetes can lead to several different types of neuropathy, each with different symptoms. ALA may help ease the symptoms of peripheral and autonomic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy The symptoms of nerve damage in people with diabetes most commonly occur in the feet and legs, but they can also occur in the hands and arms. Peripheral neuropathy can cause pain in these areas. It can also cause: numbness or an inability to feel changes in temperature a tingling or Continue reading >>

Good News For Diabetics

Good News For Diabetics

Alpha-Lipoic Acid: Alpha-lipoic acid can slow or even prevent nerve damage in diabetics.1 Speaking before the American Diabetes Association's annual meeting in San Diego in June, Professor Lester Packer, a molecular and cell biologist, delivered a hopeful message regarding a problem that 70% of all diabetics have been unable to escape. The vibrant, 70-year-old, Dr Packer of the University of California at Berkeley, recommended alpha-lipoic acid not only to diabetics but to everyone. "This is a treatment that can't do any damage, and there is even evidence that it can slow down the aging process," he said. A powerful antioxidant, alpha-lipoic acid combats cellular injuries caused by free radicals, those unstable, highly reactive molecules that are byproducts of both normal and stressed cell activity. Our bodies manufacture antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, that disarm and neutralize free radicals, but only to a certain extent. They are not able to adequately handle the continuous barrage of stressors we are subject to, such as ultraviolet radiation, cosmic rays, smoke, industrial toxins, and even natural components or metabolic products of food. Thus, without additional protection by supplemental antioxidants, excessive free radicals can damage vital cell structures and eventually initiate most chronic and degenerative diseases. The Toll of Diabetes As many as 200,000 deaths are attributable to diabetes every year in the United States, and nerve damage is the complication most directly implicated. When blood glucose levels are continuously elevated, as is often the case in diabetes, nerve damage can affect the heart, eyes, kidneys, sex organs, and legs and feet, the most severe consequence of which can be amputation of the feet. Statistics from the American Diabetes Continue reading >>

Alpha Lipoic Acid Treatments

Alpha Lipoic Acid Treatments

Alpha Lipoic Acid has several benefits for people with diabetes. Lipoic Acid is soluble in both fat and water. It is capable of regenerating several other antioxidants back to their active states, including vitamin C, vitamin E, glutathione, and coenzyme Q10. ALA. It enhances glucose uptake in type 2 adult onset diabetes, inhibits formation of AGEs (advanced glycation end products). Lipoic Acid has been used to improve diabetic nerve damage and reduce pain associated with that nerve damage. Dr. Bert Berkson tells us, “An alarming number of adults, even adults in their 20s, suffer from a pre-diabetic state. The high-carbohydrate, high-sugar diet that is so popular in America overloads the body’s response to sugar. This has the effect of altering the body’s use of insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar levels. A lot of research has focused on ALA’s ability to stimulate the insulin response and get people back to normal blood sugar levels. I’ve seen fantastic results using ALA to reverse all stages of diabetes.” ALA also chelates mercury! Natural Medication for Diabetic Neuropathic Diabetic neuropathy, a complication of both type one and type two diabetes, is probably the most common complication of the disease.[1] Studies suggest that up to 50% of people with diabetes are affected to some degree. Diabetic neuropathy is a nerve disorder caused by diabetes. The two main classifications of neuropathy are peripheral neuropathy, affecting the extremities, arms, legs, hands and feet, and autonomic neuropathy, affecting the organ systems, mainly affecting the nerves of the digestive, cardiovascular systems, urinary tract and sexual organs. Several open studies show benefits for oral Alpha lipoic acid in reducing symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy . Fo Continue reading >>

Alpha Lipoic Acid: How To Treat The Real Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

Alpha Lipoic Acid: How To Treat The Real Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

Ask someone what disease they fear the most and many will answer type 2 diabetes…and for good reason. One out of every 10 Americans has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and millions more are walking around undiagnosed every day. And if the disease isn’t bad enough, there are the terrifying complications, including: Blindness Kidney disease Heart attack Stroke Peripheral artery disease Diabetic ulcers Amputation Death The only thing more frightening than what can happen once you get type 2 diabetes is the startling ineffectiveness of the treatments that are most often recommended. While doctors will tell you, often offhandedly, to lose weight and exercise, they are more likely to prescribe a drug or even insulin, which is a HUGE mistake. If you have type 2 diabetes, you already have too much insulin in your system. So adding more insulin is like adding gasoline to a fire. It’s the LAST thing you need and it can have serious consequences.1 For example, too much insulin has been shown to: Lead to weight gain; Increase inflammation in the body; Thicken the blood; Elevate blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels; Reduce HDL cholesterol levels; Worsen or even cause depression; and Increase your risk for Alzheimer’s and cancer.2 Ultimately, the single most effect thing you can do if you have type 2 diabetes is to modify your diet to include only nutrient-dense, low-glycemic load whole foods and to get moderate daily exercise. But that requires fundamental changes to your lifestyle, which can take time; so in addition to that, you may consider using a treatment that helps your cells become more sensitive to the insulin that’s already in your body. This way, your body can naturally “hear” insulin’s message and start to lower your blood sugar l Continue reading >>

Alpha Lipoic Acid

Alpha Lipoic Acid

Ryan Bradley, ND, MPH and Bill Walter, ND May, 2012 Whether patient, family member, or health-care provider, we all know caring for diabetes requires more than 'just' keeping blood sugar balanced (which is challenging enough). There are also the associated conditions - e.g., high cholesterol, high blood pressure, neuropathy, etc., requiring time and attention to prevent severe complications which can greatly impair quality of life and rapidly limit functionality. In this month’s 'Complementary Corner' we’re going to shine a spotlight on a natural product with great potential in the care for diabetes called 'alpha-lipoic acid' (or ALA for short). ALA is a sulfur-containing compound present in human cells, where it is required for energy production within the mitochondria. In addition to its critical role in energy production, ALA is known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties - both of which are useful in managing diabetes and its complications. Research on ALA includes large clinical trials supporting its role in treating neuropathy, but research suggests it may help improve insulin sensitivity, lower blood sugar and cholesterol, improve blood vessel tone, and decrease inflammation and oxidative stress. Use in diabetes: Neuropathy In diabetes, 'neuropathy' typically refers to nerve damage accumulated over years or decades as a result of increased oxidative stress and reductions in blood flow. When occurring in the extremities (typically the legs and feet), neuropathy can lead to pain, tingling, and numbness. This loss of sensation can in turn lead to unnoticed injuries, which is why people with diabetes should have their feet checked by healthcare providers at each visit. In addition to the extremities, however, neuropathy can also develop in the nerv Continue reading >>

Alpha-lipoic Acid

Alpha-lipoic Acid

Summary All Essential Benefits/Effects/Facts & Information Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA) is a mitochondrial fatty acid that is highly involved in energy metabolism. It is synthesized in the body and can be consumed through eating meat. It is also minimally present in some fruits and vegetables. In supplement form, it has shown benefit for various forms of oxidation and inflammation. These effects protect against heart diseases, liver diseases, diabetes, and neurological decline associated with aging. ALA is a potent anti-oxidant compound. It works with mitochondria and the body's natural anti-oxidant defenses. ALA is also seen as an anti-aging compound since it can reverse some of the oxidant damage related to the effects of aging. Things to Know ALA, thioctic acid, 1, 2-dithiolane-3-pentanoic acid, ala, Tiolepta Do Not Confuse With Alpha-Lipoic Acid, despite being a fatty acid, appears to be water soluble in the gut and is absorbed by transporters. Coingestion with fatty acids in the diet does not appear to be required. Can be bound by avidin, and thus coingestion with raw egg whites can possibly negate the benefits of supplementation. -One study has indicated that long-term, relatively high-dose ALA treatment is liver toxic in mice. Warning: potential for Severe Adverse Events (SAEs). Although ALA has been well-studied and found to be safe at standard doses in humans (typically 300-600mg), high doses are toxic and may be fatal. Consult with your personal physician before taking any supplement, and do not exceed recommended doses. How to Take Recommended dosage, active amounts, other details Standard dosages of Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA) tend to be in the range of 300-600mg, with little differentiation based on whether the racemic mixture of ALA (S- and R- isomers) or Na-R-ALA Continue reading >>

Antioxidant Ala Eases Pain From Diabetic Neuropathy

Antioxidant Ala Eases Pain From Diabetic Neuropathy

In a new study published in the November issue of the journal Diabetes Care, the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid (or ALA), taken in pill form, lessened pain in people with diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage resulting from diabetes. Previous research has shown that intravenous ALA therapy can help to reduce pain and numbness due to diabetic neuropathy, but treatment with ALA in pill form has not been widely studied. In this study, 166 people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes were divided into four groups. Three of the groups received different doses of ALA, while the fourth group received a placebo (or inactive pill). After five weeks of once-daily treatment, all three groups that had been taking ALA experienced reductions in total neuropathy symptoms, stabbing pain, and burning pain compared to the placebo group. (There were, however, no significant differences between the treatment and placebo groups in numbness.) Because all three doses of ALA were similarly effective and the side effects of treatment—nausea, vomiting, and dizziness—increased with the dose, the researchers concluded that the lowest studied dose of 600 milligrams once daily appeared to be the most effective. ALA is a sulfur-containing compound that is made in small amounts in the body but is not found in food. Other studies have shown that its action as an antioxidant may not only help protect against neuropathy pain, but may also enhance insulin action, improve blood circulation, and decrease oxidative stress in people with diabetes. If you are interested in trying ALA therapy, it’s important to discuss taking it with your health-care provider before you start. There is some chance that ALA could increase the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) in people who use insulin or certain oral diabete Continue reading >>

Alpha - Lipoic Acid

Alpha - Lipoic Acid

ALPHA-LIPOIC ACID Overview Information Alpha-lipoic acid is a vitamin-like chemical called an antioxidant. Yeast, liver, kidney, spinach, broccoli, and potatoes are good sources of alpha-lipoic acid. It is also made in the laboratory for use as medicine. Alpha-lipoic acid is used for diabetes and nerve-related symptoms of diabetes including burning, pain, and numbness in the legs and arms. High doses of alpha-lipoic acid are approved in Germany for the treatment of these symptoms. Some people use alpha-lipoic acid for memory loss, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), HIV/AIDS, cancer, liver disease, diseases of the heart and blood vessels (including a disorder called cardiac autonomic neuropathy) and Lyme disease. Alpha-lipoic acid is also used to treat eye-related disorders, such as damage to the retina, cataracts, glaucoma, and an eye disease called Wilson’s disease. How does it work? Alpha-lipoic acid seems to help prevent certain kinds of cell damage in the body, and also restores vitamin levels such as vitamin E and vitamin C. There is also evidence that alpha-lipoic acid can improve the function and conduction of neurons in diabetes. Alpha-lipoic acid is used in the body to break down carbohydrates and to make energy for the other organs in the body. Alpha-lipoic acid seems to work as an antioxidant, which means that it might provide protection to the brain under conditions of damage or injury. The antioxidant effects might also be helpful in certain liver diseases. Continue reading >>

Alpha-lipoic Acid (ala) And Diabetes

Alpha-lipoic Acid (ala) And Diabetes

Exciting new research links alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) to increasing our mitochondrial energy production and helping prevent diabetes. Antioxidants are known to play a vital role in preventing many of the health disorders associated with aging, including degenerative diseases such as diabetes. Now, a vitamin-like substance known as alpha-lipoic acid is now at the forefront of antioxidant research. Actions of Alpha-Lipoic Acid Medical researchers initially classified alpha-lipoic acid as a new vitamin but then recognized it as an essential coenzyme. They found that it plays a vital role changing glucose into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for cellular energy production.1 Then, they found that alpha-lipoic acid was a powerful biological antioxidant, quenching free radicals as well as coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and vitamins C and E.2 Researchers also found that alpha-lipoic acid is unique in being the only antioxidant known to work in both fat and water-soluble tissues. (Vitamin C only works in watery tissues and vitamin E is restricted to fatty tissues. This dual ability allows alpha-lipoic acid to easily neutralize free radicals in both interior and exterior cellular structures. Now, it is called the “universal antioxidant.” More importantly, ALA recycles vitamins C, E, CoQ10, and glutathione! Nature Knows How to do Things! Human aging is marked by a sharp decline in antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, CoQ10, and glutathione. This reduces the body’s ability to protect tissues from highly reactive free radicals. Left unchecked, free radical proliferation leads to increased oxidative damage to DNA strands, cell membranes, mitochondria, and organs. Over time, the cumulative effects of free radical damage can result in impaired immune function and increased incidence of cancer Continue reading >>

Effect Of Α-lipoic Acid On Platelet Reactivity In Type 1 Diabetic Patients

Effect Of Α-lipoic Acid On Platelet Reactivity In Type 1 Diabetic Patients

Abstract OBJECTIVE Type 1 diabetes is associated with increased platelet reactivity. We investigated whether α-lipoic acid (ALA) has any effect on platelet reactivity in these patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomly assigned 51 type 1 diabetic patients to ALA (600 mg once daily) or placebo for 5 weeks. Platelet reactivity was evaluated by the PFA-100 method and by measuring CD41 and CD62 platelet expression. C-reactive protein (CRP) and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α serum levels also were measured. RESULTS Baseline variables were similar in the two groups. After treatment, closure time was longer (P = 0.006) and CD62P platelet expression was lower, both before (P = 0.002) and after (P = 0.009) ADP stimulation in the ALA group compared with the placebo group. CRP and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α levels showed no differences between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Our data show that ALA reduces measures of platelet reactivity ex vivo in type 1 diabetic patients, independently of antioxidant or anti-inflammatory effects. Type 1 diabetes is associated with the increased risk of cardiovascular disease (1). Higher platelet reactivity has been reported in diabetic patients (2,3). α-Lipoic acid (ALA) acts as a cofactor in multienzyme complexes, including pyruvate dehydrogenase and branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase, and is licensed for treatment of symptomatic diabetic neuropathy (4,5). Recent studies have suggested that ALA has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant proprieties (6–8) that might eventually improve platelet function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study to assess whether ALA has any effects on platelet reactivity, oxidative stress, and inflammation in type 1 diabetic patients. We enrolled 51 type 1 di Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alpha Lipoic Acid

Diabetes And Alpha Lipoic Acid

Go to: Introduction Lipoic acid (LA) or α-lipoic acid (ALA) is a naturally occurring compound that is also known as 1,2-dithiolane-3-pentanoic acid or thioctic acid (Busby et al., 1999). It is synthesized enzymatically in plant and animal mitochondria from octanoic acid and cysteine (as a sulfur source). ALA acts as a cofactor for pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-keto-glutarate dehydrogenase activity (Schmidt et al., 1994), and is also required for the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, a critical step bridging glycolysis and the citric acid cycle (Reed, 1998). The presence of an asymmetric carbon produces two optical isomers R-LA and S-LA. Only the naturally occurring R isomer is bound to protein and acts as an essential cofactor in biological systems (Reed, 1998). However, synthetic LA is a racemic mixture of R and S isoforms, where S-LA can prevent the polymerization of R-LA to enhance its bioavailability (Shay et al., 2009). In cells containing mitochondria, ALA is reduced in an NADH-dependent reaction with lipoamide dehydrogenase to form dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), whereas in cells that lack mitochondria, ALA can instead be reduced to DHLA via NADPH with glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin reductases (Jones et al., 2002). Unlike GSH, for which only the reduced form is an antioxidant, both the oxidized and reduced forms of LA are powerful antioxidants whose functions include: (1) quenching of reactive oxygen species (ROS), (2) regeneration of exogenous and endogenous antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, and GSH, (3) chelation of metal ions, and (4) reparation of oxidized proteins (5) regulation of gene transcription (6) inhibition of the activation of nuclear factor kapp B (NF-κB; Biewenga et al., 1997; Packer, 1998; Zhang and Frei, 2001; Figure 1). Continue reading >>

Alpha-lipoic Acid – A Viable Treatment For Diabetic Neuropathy

Alpha-lipoic Acid – A Viable Treatment For Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy now affects an estimated 15-18 million Americans. That means that close to 70% of the almost 26 million Americans with type 2 diabetes suffer from this sometimes debilitating condition. And while there are approximately 100 different causes of neuropathy, diabetes ranks highest on the list, accounting for a full one third of neuropathy cases. Symptoms associated with diabetic neuropathy can be quite aggressive and include pain, loss of sensation, tingling and even weakness, typically affecting hands and feet. Clinicians and researchers in Europe have long known about the effectiveness of a common nutritional supplement, alpha-lipoic acid, as an effective approach to diabetic neuropathy. But here in America most patients are given pharmaceuticals to treat the symptoms. And yet, wonderful clinical data now confirms the profound effectiveness of alpha-lipoic acid in treating diabetic neuropathy. Both the well-conducted research as well as my own clinical experience in using this nonprescription approach to treating diabetic neuropathy will keep alpha-lipoic acid in my tool kit. Lipoic acid is a potent and protective antioxidant that is both fat and water-soluble. That means it can penetrate virtually all of the body’s tissues, including the brain and nerves. In addition, it acts as a heavy metal chelator, helping the body rid itself of toxic metals like lead and mercury. It also helps maintain levels of another brain important antioxidant, glutathione. That’s why I’ve included lipoic acid as one of my “super seven” fundamental supplements. For more information, order your copy of Grain Brain today and join Dr. Perlmutter’s email list. Read Next Continue reading >>

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