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Advantages And Disadvantages Of Metformin

Advantages Of Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Advantages Of Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract Metformin is a first-line pharmacological treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus because of its favorable overall profile, including its glucose-lowering ability, weight-neutral effects, and low risk of hypoglycemia; however, gastrointestinal (GI) intolerance may limit use in some patients. Extended-release metformin improves GI tolerability, allows once-daily dosing, and is currently available in multiple branded and generic formulations; however, it is more expensive than immediate-release metformin. Maximum plasma metformin concentrations are reached more slowly with the extended-release formulation compared with conventional immediate-release metformin, although both provide similar exposure at a given total daily dose. Extended-release metformin is as effective as immediate-release metformin in patients newly started on metformin and those switched from the immediate-release formulation, with similar weight-neutral effects. Tolerability is generally comparable, although patients switched from the immediate-release formulation--even those switched due to GI intolerance--are often better able to tolerate the extended-release formulation. Based on studies of extended-release formulations in other disease states, metformin extended-release formulation has the potential to improve patient adherence with a simpler dosing regimen and increased tolerability. Increased adherence may result in greater glycemic control, and in turn, improve outcomes and lower health care usage and costs. Extended-release metformin provides an appropriate option for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who require several medications to achieve glycemic control or manage comorbid conditions, and for those who have GI intolerance with the immediate-release formulation. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication: Disadvantages & Other Considerations

Diabetes Medication: Disadvantages & Other Considerations

DISADVANTAGES OF INSULIN SENSITIZERS AND INSULIN MIMETICS Although insulin mimetics and insulin-sensitizing agents are some of the best tools we have for controlling blood sugars, they are not without their difficulties. Since alpha lipoic acid and evening primrose oil are not prescription drugs in most countries (Germany is a notable exception), they are not covered by most health insurance. Alpha lipoic acid is not inexpensive; at this writing, a supply of 60 Alpha Lipoic Sustain 300 mg tablets costs about $30–$40. ALA reduces body stores of biotin, a substance that aids in the utilization of protein and a variety of other nutrients, so when you take alpha lipoic acid, you might be wise to take biotin supplements also. Your biotin intake should theoretically equal about 1 percent of your alpha lipoic acid intake, so if you are taking 1,800 mg ALA per day, in theory you would take about 18 mg of biotin. Most of my patients who use alpha lipoic acid don’t take more than about 15 mg biotin per day, and they experience no apparent adverse effects. Most preparations come only in 1 mg strengths.* You can take the biotin once daily. Metformin has a very low side-effects profile, with the exception of gastrointestinal distress—queasiness, nausea, diarrhea, or a slight bellyache—in as many as a third of the people who try the non– timed-release version. Most people who experience such discomfort, however, find that it diminishes as they become accustomed to the medication. Only a very few patients can’t tolerate it at all. (Some patients, particularly obese people who are anxious to achieve the weight loss that metformin can facilitate, will ignore any initial gastrointestinal distress and use an antacid drug such as Pepcid or Tagamet for relief. Others, who may on Continue reading >>

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

Metformin (brand name "Glucophage") has been used in the treatment of type II diabetes for the past 40 years.1 This drug counteracts many of the underlying factors that result in the manifestation of this insidious disease. Metformin also produces helpful side benefits that can protect against the lethal complications of type II diabetes. Frequently prescribed anti-diabetic drugs fail to address the fundamental causes of type II diabetes and can induce serious side effects. Type II diabetes affects between 16 to 19 million Americans. About 75% of type II diabetics will die from a cardiovascular-related disease. Conventional doctors often prescribe drugs for the purpose of lowering blood sugar levels. These drugs do not adequately address the multiple underlying pathologies associated with the type II diabetic state. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream as cells become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream because cells become resistant to the effects of insulin and fail to take up glucose As the type II diabetic condition progresses, many people gain weight and develop more fat cells.2 Treating type II diabetes with insulin-enhancing therapy increases the risk of cardiovascular complications, induces weight gain, and fails to correct the underlying cause of the disease. Many type II diabetics produce too much insulin in a futile attempt to drive glucose into insulin-resistant cells. When doctors prescribe insulin-enhancing drugs to these type II diabetics, a temporarily reduction of serum glucose may occur, but the long-term effects of this excess insu Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications

Oral Diabetes Medications

A list of oral diabetes medications with advantages, disadvantages, and side effects. Click on the name of a drug for more information. Biguanides Glucophage (generic name: metformin) Glucophage XR (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Fortamet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Glumetza (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Riomet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride liquid) What are Biguanides? Metformin is the only member of the biguanides family in use today. Metformin (met-FOR-min) helps lower blood glucose by making sure your liver does not put extra glucose into the system when it is not needed. The ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes recommend the inclusion of metformin (along with diet and exercise) in initial diabetes treatment. A good thing about metformin is that it does not cause blood glucose to get too low (hypoglycemia) when it is the only diabetes medicine you take. Who can take this medicine? Adults with type 2 diabetes can take metformin with their doctor’s approval and supervision. You should avoid metformin if you have liver or kidney problems, lung or heart disease, or conditions that cause low blood oxygen levels. Who should not take this medicine? People with certain types of heart problems, such as congestive heart failure, should use caution with this medicine. People with reduced kidney function or kidney disease should probably not take metformin. It should be used with caution if you regularly consume more than two to three drinks daily, so check with your doctor about that. Advantages Metformin, when used alone, is unlikely to cause low blood sugar. It is one of those medicines that always seems to help even after people have had diabetes for a while, and, for this reason Continue reading >>

The Pros And Cons Of Metformin For Diabetes

The Pros And Cons Of Metformin For Diabetes

Metformin is #7 on the doctors’ hit parade of top 10 prescription drugs. Each year the number of prescriptions increases substantially. Last year there were 87 million metformin prescriptions dispensed in U.S. pharmacies. That does not count combo products that include metformin in their formulation such as Glucovance, Invokamet, Janumet, Kombiglyze XR, Metaglip and Synjardy, to name just a few. Metformin is clearly the #1 drug for diabetes and because the number of people with diabetes keeps going up, prescriptions for metformin are skyrocketing. That’s why readers of our syndicated newspaper column and visitors to this website are so desperate to learn more about metformin for diabetes. How To Know If Metformin for Diabetes Is Right for You: Here is a typical letter from a reader: Q. I crossed the line a month ago from normal blood sugar to type 2 diabetes and was put on metformin. I hate taking drugs. What can you tell me about metformin? Thank the Old Wives: A. Metformin is one of the oldest and most well-studied diabetes medicines. It probably comes as a shock to most prescribers to learn that their favorite diabetes drug is available thanks to the old wives. Practitioners of folk medicine discovered that French lilac (Galega officinalis) helped control the symptoms of a condition associated with “sweet urine.” An article in the Journal of Clinical Investigation (Oct. 15, 2001) noted: “In medieval times, a prescription of Galega officinalis was said to relieve the intense urination accompanying the disease that came to have the name of diabetes mellitus [now known as type 2 diabetes].” The botanist and physician Nicholas Culpeper detailed the health benefits of French lilac in 1656. He described the ability of the plant to lower blood sugar and control Continue reading >>

Disadvantages Of Taking Metformin

Disadvantages Of Taking Metformin

Benefits of Metformin - Diabetes Home Page Benefits of Metformin. ... However, as with any medication, there are possible side effects of metformin, and taking metformin is not without risk. New study examines risks and benefits of the first line ... New study examines risks and benefits of the ... It is essential that patients taking metformin who have ... metformin may be the one with the least disadvantages. The Multiple Benefits of Metformin - Life Extension The Multiple Benefits of Metformin. Metformin (brand name "Glucophage") has been used in the treatment of type II diabetes for the past 40 years. Metformin Side Effects in Detail - Drugs.com Learn about the potential side effects of metformin. Includes common and rare side effects information for consumers and healthcare professionals. Long term treatment with metformin in patients with ... - BMJ Results Compared with placebo, metformin treatment was associated with a mean decrease in vitamin ... BMJ 2010; 340 doi: http ... There are few disadvantages to the ... Benefits Of Metformin Justify its Use? - All About Beating ... What are the benefits of Metformin on diabetics? What about Metformin Weight loss benefits? Are the Metformin benefits a good reasong to keep taking this drug? Metformin (By mouth) - National Library of Medicine - PubMed ... Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. With this type ... Metformin Advantages And Disadvantages (Metformin ... - jbims.edu TODAY OFFER: Only 0.23 per pill. Diabetes - metformin advantages and disadvantages, buy glucophage online, glucophage price What are the advantages/disadvantages of starting treating ... What are the advantages/disadvantages of starting treating ... Continue reading >>

Metformin: Benefits, Side Effects

Metformin: Benefits, Side Effects

Metformin, brand name Glucophage You may be taking or considering metformin if you have Type II diabetes, “prediabetes,” or, though the scientific evidence for its use isn’t so solid, polycystic ovary syndrome. Metformin works in several ways. It helps certain parts of the body respond properly to insulin, reduces how much glucose is released into the bloodstream, and does a few other things. Most of what we know about Metformin is good. It doesn’t seem to cause weight gain, and in fact, may cause slight weight loss. It’s affordable. And it has 4 decades of use, meaning we know a lot more about it than many other medications. One study showed that use of metformin over several years reduced mortality – or death -rates related to diabetes by an impressive 36%. Side effects of metformin Metformin’s side effects are mostly mild and treatable, though there is a the rare chance of a problem called lactic acidosis. About 30% of users experience some sort of side effect, including indigestion and diarrhea. Taking metformin with a meal is one way to reduce problems, as well as taking an extended release version. The immediate release form has about a 17% rate of diarrhea, for instance, while the extended release has only about 8%. Some have complained that metformin makes them smell bad. Lactic acidosis is a very rare side effect that is fatal about 50% of the time. Estimates of how often it occurs range from 1/30,000 patient-years to a bit higher. But assuming you meet the criteria for using metformin, most likely you shouldn’t worry about it. Most doctors strongly feel that the benefits of metformin outweigh the risks of lactic acidosis. As one doctor puts it, “Of 10,000 diabetic patients treated for 10 years with metformin, only 10 will die from lactic acid Continue reading >>

Study Examines Risks, Benefits Of Metformin

Study Examines Risks, Benefits Of Metformin

Although the drug metformin is considered the gold standard in the management of type 2 diabetes, a study by a group of French researchers published in this week's PLoS Medicine suggests that the long-term benefits of this drug compared with the risks are not clearly established—an important finding given that currently, thousands of people around the world are regularly taking metformin to help control their blood sugar levels in the belief that it also has long-lasting health benefits. For the past 14 years, metformin has been recommended as the first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes after a landmark study (the UK Prospective Diabetes Study) reported that when combined with dietary control measures, metformin reduced death from all causes in overweight people with type 2 diabetes. However, an overlooked finding from this study was that in non-overweight people with type 2 diabetes, metformin may actually increase the risk of death. In this new analysis, the authors led by Catherine Cornu from the Clinical Investigation Centre, in Lyon, France, analysed the data available from all relevant studies to re-evaluate the balance of the benefits versus the risks of taking metformin for type 2 diabetes. Using information from 13 randomized controlled trials (which included a total of more than 13,000 patients) the authors found that compared to other drugs, metformin had no effect on the risk of death from all causes or on the risk of death from cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, metformin had no significant effect on the risk of developing cardiovascular conditions such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart failure. The authors conclude: "We cannot exclude beyond any reasonable doubt that metformin use increases or decreases the risk of all-cause mortality or cardiovasc Continue reading >>

Disadvantages & Advantages Of Metformin

Disadvantages & Advantages Of Metformin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am doing ND at the moment but shall not know til the end whether or not I am one of the people for whom it won't work because I might have had T2 long enough for beta cells to have "drowned" in fat and therefore impossible to resuscitate. While I am waiting to find out I am considering what to do if I turn out to be one of the unlucky ones and it doesn't work for me. I shall never regret trying it so that at least I shall know where I stand. I have heard Metformin causes some people the trots, but that some find after a while this disappears, or it disappears on a change to slow release pills. Also I should like to hear from people who found it beneficial to them. Thank you in advance for your experiences of it. Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member I started on Metformin straight away on diagnosis. I started on 1x500mg/day in the first week, added two more tablets over the next two weeks, thats where I stay 3 per day. The first week I had some diarrhoea but not constant, just a couple of times a day. I also had a bit of a tummy ache after taking each tablet. All these symptoms went away after about a week and I suffer no side effects now. At some point I may ask to reduce back down to two but Im not bothered about coming off them entirely as they have several other benefits. I started on Metformin straight away on diagnosis. I started on 1x500mg/day in the first week, added two more tablets over the next two weeks, thats where I stay 3 per day. The first week I had some diarrhoea but not constant, just a couple of times a day. I also had a bit of a tummy ache after taking each tablet. All these symptoms went away after about a week and I Continue reading >>

New Studies Highlight Metformins Pros And Cons - Diabetes | Healthcentral

New Studies Highlight Metformins Pros And Cons - Diabetes | Healthcentral

Its probably no surprise that metformin, the most popular diabetes medicine, figured in about 200 of the presentations at the recent annual convention of the American Diabetes Association. At least two of these presentations show good news about the drugs likely role in degenerative nerve disease and in dispelling concerns about its possible role in neuropathy. One presentation, however, highlights some disturbing results, and the rest are of less interest to most people with diabetes. A team of researchers from Tulane Universitys School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine presented one poster and one oral presentation about metformin. Shuqian Liu, MD, presented the poster. She designed both of these studies. The poster, 570-P, reported a retrospective study that examined the effect of high doses of metformin on neuropathy, a complication for 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes . This is a concern because previous studies had showed that metformin decreases vitamin B12, which may be linked to neuropathy. Using data from Veterans Affairs electronic medical records for 2004 to 2010, the study compared the effects of high- and standard-doses of metformin on neuropathy among more than 12,000 veterans who have diabetes. But only an average daily metformin dose of more than 2500 mg was associated with an increased risk of neuropathy. Few people with diabetes take that much, because the daily maintenance dose is 2000 mg. Metformin and degenerative nerve diseases Even better news for people taking metformin came out in the companion study, 72-OR, that the Tulane team presented. This study was the oral presentation by Qian Shi, a PhD candidate. This study also used VA records for 2004 to 2010, this time studying more than 6,000 veterans to determine if the length of met Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Medication For Type 2 Diabetes

Medication For Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes. Depending on age and lifestyle, different medications and treatment goals can be important. It also depends on whether people have any other health problems. Since high blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) are the main sign of type 2 diabetes, it seems logical to use blood-sugar lowering medication. But that is not always necessary. Medication is only needed if blood sugar levels cannot be regulated any other way, for example by changing your diet, losing weight or exercising more. Blood sugar levels that are permanently high can cause damage to the retina or the kidneys, and can also harm the blood vessels. The risk of stroke or heart attack may also increase. But the age at which type 2 diabetes begins also plays a role. Many older people with type 2 diabetes do not have any problems caused by an increased blood sugar level. For them, other conditions like high blood pressure are more serious. But if you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in your forties, you will probably live with the condition for quite a long time. Complications can occur even if your blood sugar levels are only slightly too high over a long period of time. It is therefore very important for younger people with diabetes to keep their blood sugar levels low. Drugs for lowering the risk of cardiac diseases Type 2 diabetes increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases. But people with diabetes often have other risk factors as well, like high blood pressure. It is then quite likely that treating those other factors may be more effective at lowering the risk of heart attack or stroke than keeping blood sugar levels low. The main drugs are: All of those drugs can have side effects. It is a good idea to talk to your doctor befo Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage)

Metformin (glucophage)

Metformin has a really interesting story. Structurally metformin is a biguanide and its chemical structure is related to guanidine. Guanidine-like compounds are extracted from the medicinal herb Galega officinalis (Goats rue). The glucose-lowering properties of guanidine where recognized early in the 20th century. Galega officinalis extracts were used to treat diabetes in the 1920s but had prohibitive gastrointestinal side effects. Metformin itself was first prepared in 1922 by the Dublin chemists Emil A. Werner and James Bell. In 1929, Slotta and Tschesche discovered its sugar-lowering action was the most potent of the biguanide analogs they studied. However, the discovery of the action of metformin was soon overshadowed by insulin. Under the suggestive name of flumamine, the guanidine analogue was used by Eusebio Y. Garcia (an eminent Philippine specialist in infectious diseases) for the treatment of viral influenza in 1949 1 , 2 . He noted sugar-lowering properties of the drug. The publication 1 from the Philippines, mentioning glucose lowering effects of biguanidines, stimulated Jean Stern, a French researcher and diabetologist, in 1957 to try "flumamine" for diabetics. Thus Jean Sterne was the first to try metformin on humans for the treatment of diabetes. He coined the name "Glucophage" (glucose eater) for the drug and published his results in 1957. The drug, soon renamed metformin, demonstrated a significant advantage over insulin, at least for treating type 2 diabetes. Metformin was introduced to the United Kingdom in 1958, and Canada in 1972. In the United States broad interest in metformin began to rise only after the other biguanides (phenformin and buformin) were withdrawn in the 1970s. Only in 1995 metformin received FDA approval. Improve glycemic control Continue reading >>

Questions And Anwers About Metformin And Type 2 Diabetes

Questions And Anwers About Metformin And Type 2 Diabetes

DIABETES HEALTH: What is metformin? Dr. Einhorn: Metformin hydrochloride is a new oral anti-hyperglycemic for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has been available for decades in other countries but has only been available in the United States since May 1995. Metformin increases insulin sensitivity and inhibits liver glucose output. It may decrease the absorption of glucose from the intestine. This is different from sulfonylureas like Glucotrol, Micronase, Glynase, and DiaBeta, which act mainly by increasing insulin production. Because of these different effects, metformin works well in combination with sulfonylureas. DI: Who should take metformin? DE: The drug is ideal for people with type 2 diabetes who also suffer from obesity and abnormal cholesterol and triglycerides. In combination with sulfonylureas like glyburide and glipizide, metformin works well and may take the place of insulin. Metformin is a good first or second line agent for the treatment of obese type 2 diabetics, especially those with resistance to insulin. Typically these are individuals with upper body obesity, hypertension, and lipid imbalances in the blood. Since metformin promotes weight loss, decreases hyperglycemia, and improves lipid levels, the drug offers clear advantages. DI: What are the advantages of Metformin? DE: As a single agent, metformin is as effective as sulfonylureas for lowering blood glucose. It lowers fasting glucoses by approximately 60 mg/dl, lowers after meal glucoses by approximately 80 mg/dl, and lowers glycohemoglobin by approximately 1.8%. However, unlike sulfonylureas, metformin actually assists in weight loss, produces no hypoglycemia (when used alone), and lowers triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. If a patient has good glucose control with sulfony Continue reading >>

Metformin: Side-effects & Benefits

Metformin: Side-effects & Benefits

Editor’s Note: Metformin is considered one of the safest and most effective treatments for type 2 diabetes. Although you should be aware of the side effects below, metformin is typically safe and well-tolerated. Metformin is used alone or with other medications, including insulin, to treat type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). Metformin is in a class of drugs called biguanides. Metformin helps to control the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood. It decreases the amount of glucose you absorb from your food and the amount of glucose made by your liver. Metformin also increases your body’s response to insulin, a natural substance that controls the amount of glucose in the blood. I’m also beginning to see where metformin is used in addition to insulin to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). How about the associated long term side effects of metformin? Lets take a closer look! *Be sure to read this article: Patients Share their Experience on Metformin. Metformin and Lactic Acidosis: Although rare, lactic acidosis is potentially the most serious of the metformin side effects. The uptake of lactate by the liver is effected by metformin in a negative way. If the kidneys do not process the excess lactate the blood of the patient will acidify which can lead to a whole slew of problems. Most of which are similar to the feeling one gets after an intense workout. For example: anxiety, hyperventilation, irregular heart rate nausea and in some cases vomiting. This is the reason that metformin is generally only prescribed to people with a healthy kidney function. This side e Continue reading >>

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