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Advances In Type 1 Diabetes

New Diabetes Treatment Could Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

New Diabetes Treatment Could Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

A cell-based diabetes treatment has been developed by scientists who say it could eliminate the need for those with the condition to inject insulin. The therapy involves a capsule of genetically engineered cells implanted under the skin that automatically release insulin as required. Diabetic mice that were treated with the cells were found to have normal blood sugar levels for several weeks. Scientists said they hope to obtain a clinical trial licence to test the technology in patients within two years. If successful, the treatment would be relevant for all type 1 diabetes patients, as well as those cases of type 2 diabetes that require insulin injections. Martin Fussenegger, who led the research at the ETH university in Basel, said: “By 2040, every tenth human on the planet will suffer from some kind of diabetes, that’s dramatic. We should be able to do a lot better than people measuring their glucose.” Fussenegger said that, if confirmed as safe and effective in humans, diabetes patients could be given an implant that would need to be replaced three times a year rather than injections, which do not perfectly control blood sugar levels, leading to long-term complications including eye, nerve and heart damage. In Britain, about 400,000 people have type 1 diabetes and three million have type 2 diabetes, about 10% of whom need to inject insulin to control the condition. Type 1 diabetes normally begins in childhood and is an autoimmune disease in which the body kills off all its pancreatic beta cells. The cells respond to the body’s fluctuating glucose levels by releasing insulin, which regulates blood sugar. Without beta cells, patients need to monitor glucose and inject insulin as required – typically several times each day. Previously, scientists have attempt Continue reading >>

7 Innovations That Are Changing The Way We Manage Diabetes, A Disease That Affects 371 Million People Worldwide

7 Innovations That Are Changing The Way We Manage Diabetes, A Disease That Affects 371 Million People Worldwide

It's been almost a century since researchers discovered a way to treat diabetes. Since then, there have been a number of medical and technological advances that aim to make the lives of people living with diabetes — both type 1 and type 2 — more manageable. Around the globe, the group of conditions affects 371 million people worldwide, a number that's expected to increase to 552 million by 2030. From monitoring blood sugar levels — a taxing experience that people with diabetes must grow used to doing every day — to ways that make insulin easier to deliver, here are some of the innovations that are changing the way we manage diabetes. Medtronic created the world's first 'artificial pancreas.' In September, the FDA approved a device that's often referred to as an "artificial pancreas" for use in people with type 1 diabetes over age 14. The device, made by Medtronic, is called the MiniMed 670G, and it works by automatically monitoring a person's blood sugar levels and administering insulin as needed — no constant checking and injecting required. That way, it can act like a pancreas, the organ in our bodies that in healthy people is able to moderate our blood sugar levels by pumping out insulin that can process the sugars found in food. Livongo is making a glucose monitor that can get software updates just like your phone. "No one cares about the technology," Glen Tullman, the CEO of California-based startup Livongo and whose son has Type 1 diabetes, told Business Insider. "They simply want to live their life." On Wednesday, the company added the capability for the monitor to receive software updates, eliminating the need for people to constantly upgrade to new glucose meters when the technology advances. Livongo also offers the testing strips the machine uses for Continue reading >>

August Type 1 Diabetes Research Update

August Type 1 Diabetes Research Update

Recently, the media has been full of stories highlighting new and emerging advancements in type 1 diabetes research and devices. With such an influx of information it can be difficult keep up with all of the exciting developments taking place around the world. To shine a light on some of these, we’ve composed a short list of some of the most exciting stories emerging in the past few months. Type 1 Diabetes Cured in Mice In May, researchers from the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio announced they have found a way to cure type 1 diabetes in mice. This comes after research spanning the past few years has investigated replacing the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas, which are destroyed in cases of type 1 diabetes. Medical News Today reports that rather than replace these beta cells, Dr Bruno Doiron and his team at the university have used a method of gene transfer to help trigger other pancreatic cells to produce insulin. This technique is called Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing and has led to long-term insulin secretion and blood glucose regulation in mice with no adverse side effects. As always with studies tested on animals, more research is required before this technique can be trialled in humans, though it is projected that trials could commence sometime in the next three years. ‘Artificial Pancreas’ Trials in Australia Closer to home, an exciting Australia-first study will see people from across the country fitted with an ‘artificial pancreas.’ When speaking to JDRF Australia, Professor Tim Jones, co-director of the Children’s Diabetes Centre at the Telethon Kids Institute said, “The hybrid closed-loop system consists of an insulin pump, [continuous glucose monitoring (CGM)] sensor with transmitter attach Continue reading >>

Jdrf’s Top Advances On Type 1 Diabetes Cure & Treatment Research

Jdrf’s Top Advances On Type 1 Diabetes Cure & Treatment Research

“JDRF made exciting progress this year in our mission of accelerating life-changing breakthroughs to cure, prevent and treat type 1 diabetes (T1D) and its complications,” explains Emily Howell from JDRF. This video with Aaron Kowalski, Ph.D. features some of JDRF’s most promising and exciting advances in type 1 diabetes cure and treatment research and technology. (Kowalski also takes questions from people in the diabetes community!) Here are a few of the notable advances mentioned in the video with details provided by Emily Howell. ViaCyte: Implantable Insulin Capsule JDRF is paving a pathway to a cure by pursuing research priorities that can improve treatment of T1D in the short term and mature over time into curative therapies. For example, ViaCyte’s VC-01 device that features pancreatic precursor cells enclosed in a device to protect them from immune attack. In January 2016 ViaCyte reported that VC-01’s precursor cells showed signs of developing into insulin-producing beta cells in one participant of the phase 1 safety trial. According to ViaCyte, although the observations are preliminary, they suggest the VC-01 device is working as designed. Read more about past ViaCyte research updates. Early Screening for Type 1 Diabetes in Children JDRF is funding the Fr1da project, in which 3-and 4-year-olds in Bavaria, Germany, are screened for early-stage markers of T1D at well-child visits. Those who test positive for the markers can enroll in a study monitoring disease progression or a trial testing whether oral insulin can stop progression of T1D. This trial raises the exciting prospect of stopping T1D in its tracks and changing the future for those at risk of developing T1D. New T1D Classification System Leading diabetes organizations along with JDRF’s leadersh Continue reading >>

Harvard And Mit Close To ‘cure’ For Type 1 Diabetes Which Will End Daily Injections

Harvard And Mit Close To ‘cure’ For Type 1 Diabetes Which Will End Daily Injections

A cure for type 1 diabetes is closer than ever after scientists showed they can switch off the disease for six months in animals – which would equate to several years in humans. In 2014, researchers at Harvard University discovered how to make huge quantities of insulin-producing cells, in a breakthrough hailed as significant as antibiotics. Now a team at MIT has proven that planting the cells into mice can completely restore insulin function for a long time. "These treatments aim to effectively establish long-term insulin independence and eliminate the daily burden of managing the disease for months, possibly years, at a time" Julia Greenstein JDRF, the type 1 diabetes research charity It could mean the end of daily insulin injections for the 400,000 people in Britain living with Type 1 diabetes. Instead they would simply need a transfusion of engineered cells every few years. Researchers say human trials are just a few years away. “We are excited by these results, and are working hard to advance this technology to the clinic,” said Dr Daniel Anderson, professor of applied biology at MIT. “These results lay the groundwork for future human studies using these formulations with the goal of achieving long-term replacement therapy for type one diabetes. “We believe (the cells) have the potential to provide insulin independence for patients suffering from this disease. "It has the potential to provide diabetics with a new pancreas that is protected from the immune system, which would allow them to control their blood sugar without taking drugs. That’s the dream.” Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that causes the pancreas to stop producing insulin - the hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. If the amount of glucose in the blood is too high it ca Continue reading >>

Author Advances Damaging Myth About Diabetes

Author Advances Damaging Myth About Diabetes

Jim Hirsch, diaTribe contributor and bestselling author, weighs in on a damaging diabetes myth: “They’re never going to cure diabetes, because there’s too much money in it.” This article prompted a letter of complaint from Dr. Denise Faustman, printed below, followed by responses from Jeffrey Brewer and Mr. Hirsch. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 40 years ago, and I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard someone say that or words to that effect. It’s understandable. Diabetes is big business, and as the drugs and medical devices have become more sophisticated and expensive each year – and as more people are diagnosed each day – diabetes itself becomes an even bigger business. In the United States, about $200 billion a year is spent in direct costs for diabetes, including hospital and emergency care. Hence the conclusion: In the view of frustrated patients, family members, and loved ones, there’s just too much money to be made in this disease for a cure to ever be found. Powerful corporate interests will see to that. Even worse: Conspiracy theorists believe that the companies that profit from diabetes are actively thwarting a cure. Or as one person told me, “Eli Lilly has the cure in its vault, but it won’t let it out.” *** I was recently listening to NPR and heard the writer Elisabeth Rosenthal discuss her new book, “American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back.” The title captures her central theme, that health care in America has been compromised by corporations that have their put their financial interests ahead of all else. Profits trump patients. During the NPR interview, she described how health care companies stand to earn more from therapies than from cures. “If you’re a pharmaceutical Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children Links

Type 1 Diabetes In Children Links

Managing type 1 diabetes is challenging, but with the help of an experienced team, your child can lead a healthy, active life. The Duke Children’s diabetes care team understands what it’s like to live with diabetes and provides comprehensive care, education, and support. We make sure you and your child have the information and resources you need to manage all aspects of living with diabetes -- physical, emotional, and practical. You can count on our support to help you and your child take control of your child’s health. What Is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes, also called juvenile diabetes, occurs when the body’s immune system destroys cells in the pancreas that create insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar (known as glucose) from your bloodstream and delivers it into your cells to be used for energy. Without insulin, your blood sugar levels remain high -- which can lead to serious health complications over time. Because their bodies don’t make insulin, children with type 1 diabetes must get insulin from multiple daily injections or an insulin pump. They also must test their blood sugar levels throughout the day and pay special attention to diet and exercise. Managing your child’s type 1 diabetes can sometimes seem overwhelming. The Duke Children’s diabetes care team can help you overcome these challenges. We offer expert medical guidance and give you and your child information, support, and encouragement to manage and live well with diabetes. A Comprehensive, Team Approach to Type 1 Diabetes At Duke Children’s, you can be confident that your child will receive care from an experienced team that’s known for its expertise. We’re nationally ranked for pediatric diabetes and endocrinology by U.S. News & World Report, and we are recognized by th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technology Moves Closer To Making Life Easier For Patients

Diabetes Technology Moves Closer To Making Life Easier For Patients

For people with diabetes, keeping blood sugar levels in a normal range – not too high or too low – is a lifelong challenge. New technologies to ease the burden are emerging rapidly, but insurance reimbursement challenges, supply shortages, and shifting competition make it tough for patients to access them quickly. One new product is a fast-acting insulin from Novo Nordisk. It is designed to help to minimize the high blood sugar spikes that often occur when people with diabetes eat a meal containing carbohydrates. This new formulation, branded "Fiasp," adds niacinamide (vitamin B3), which roughly doubles the speed of initial insulin absorption compared to current fast-acting insulins taken at mealtime. This new insulin hits the bloodstream in under three minutes. Another advance is Abbott's new monitoring device called the FreeStyle Libre Flash. It's new in the U.S. but has been available in Europe since 2014. It's a round patch with a catheter that is inserted on the arm for up to 10 days and a durable scanning device that the user waves over the patch to read the level of sugar in their tissues, which reflects the blood sugar level. The Libre works a bit differently than the two currently available continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) made by Dexcom and Medtronic. The Libre doesn't require users to prick their fingers for blood tests to calibrate it, whereas users of the other monitors must perform twice-daily fingerstick calibrations. Also, the Libre is approved for longer wear – 10 days (14 in Europe) versus seven days for the two current CGMs. And, it is likely to be considerably less expensive, although Abbott isn't providing cost information for the U.S. just yet. In Europe, the Libre system costs about four Euros a day (about $4.70). But, unlike the current d Continue reading >>

Research Advances Efforts To Screen Children For Type 1 Diabetes

Research Advances Efforts To Screen Children For Type 1 Diabetes

Research advances efforts to screen children for type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes, previously known as juvenile diabetes, accounts for 5 percent of all diabetes cases in the United States, is a relatively rare form of diabetes where the pancreas produces no insulin. By Amy Wallace|Sept. 13, 2017 at 10:45 AM Sept. 13 (UPI) -- Researchers have developed a new antibody detection technology that could improve the accuracy of diagnostic tests for type 1 diabetes in young children. Type 1 diabetes, previously known as juvenile diabetes, accounts for 5 percent of all diabetes cases in the United States, is a relatively rare form of diabetes where the pancreas produces no insulin. The National Institutes of Health report rates of type 1 diabetes are increasing by 1.8 percent each year. A team of researchers from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Stanford University and the University of Florida collaborated on the study that could make population-wide type 1 diabetes screening possible. "Although current tests are about 94 percent accurate in detecting the antibodies years before children and young adults lose all blood sugar control, they are not accurate enough to rely upon for populationwide screening, so current antibody testing is limited to confirming diagnosis in symptomatic children and adults. Increasing the test accuracy will help expand screening for asymptomatic type 1 diabetes into the general population," Dax Fu, associate professor of physiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a news release . "Presymptomatic diagnosis will provide the benefit of beginning preventative therapies." The study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , allows for screening of more autoimmune antibodies in type 1 d Continue reading >>

Recent Advances In Type 1 Diabetes

Recent Advances In Type 1 Diabetes

Mervyn Kyi, John M Wentworth, Alison J Nankervis, Spiros Fourlanos and Peter G Colman Med J Aust 2015; 203 (7): 290-293. || doi: 10.5694/mja14.01691 Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by an autoimmune attack on pancreatic beta cells that leads to insulin deficiency. The incidence of T1D in Australia has doubled over the past 20 years. T1D treatment focuses on physiological insulin replacement, aiming for near-normal blood glucose levels. Hypoglycaemia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in T1D. Optimal T1D management is complex, and is enhanced by empowering individuals in all aspects of managing diabetes. New technologies, including insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors and sensor-augmented pumps, can assist people achieve better glycaemic control and reduce the risk of severe hypoglycaemia. Women with T1D can achieve significantly better outcomes during pregnancy and for their infants by planning for their pregnancy and by intensive glycaemic control. Several trials are underway that seek to identify the determinants of autoimmunity and to develop therapies that prevent T1D in at-risk individuals. Pancreatic and islet cell transplants are proven therapies, but are only offered to individuals with diabetes and renal failure (pancreas) or severe hypoglycaemia unawareness (islet cell transplants). Although T1D is still associated with considerable premature mortality, recent findings show that a significant improvement in life expectancy has occurred. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) affects around 120 000 Australians, half of whom are diagnosed in adulthood. 1 It is caused by the immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic beta cells, leading to insulin deficiency, hyperglycaemia and the risk of ketoacidosis. Antibodies directed against the beta-cell antigens insuli Continue reading >>

Mary Tyler Moore's Life Offers Hope For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Mary Tyler Moore's Life Offers Hope For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Mary Tyler Moore's death on Wednesday at age 80 may highlight the long-term effects that type 1 diabetes can have on the body. Moore died Jan. 25 after going into cardiopulmonary arrest, which means her heart stopped beating, several news outlets reported, citing Moore's publicist Mara Buxbaum. She had also recently contracted pneumonia. Moore had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was in her 30s. With new advances in medicine, type 1 diabetes no longer means a certain premature death, but it still has a significant impact on the body over time. [Extending Life: 7 Ways to Live Past 100] "The main way the body is affected is the chronic exposure to high blood sugar. These high blood sugars damage various organs — in particular, the eyes, kidneys and nerves — to increase cardiovascular disease," said Dr. Robert Gabbay, the chief medical officer at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, a nonprofit research institution affiliated with Harvard Medical School. In people with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas has nearly completely stopped producing insulin, the hormone that allows the body cells to take in glucose and use it for energy. (This is a different condition from type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin or use insulin effectively.) In those with type 1 diabetes, glucose instead builds up in the blood stream, and can cause fatigue, weakness, weight loss and excessive urination when untreated. Eventually, the disease can cause complications, including heart attack, strokes, blindness and kidney failure, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center. But is it possible to die from complications of type 1 diabetes? "Unfortunately, very much so," Gabbay told Live Science. "In the absence of insulin treatment, people with diabetes will d Continue reading >>

Technology And Advocacy For Patients With Type-1 Diabetes

Technology And Advocacy For Patients With Type-1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a struggle for the kids who have it, and for their parents who keep a constant watch on them. And while the risks of not precisely managing the disease are enormous, technology is making huge strides in helping patients with the illness. Vermont Edition talks with families and researchers about new advances that help monitor and control Type 1 diabetes, and the day-to-day experience of living with the condition. Our guests are Amanda Bloom, a Vermont high school student who just returned from the Children's Congress in Washington D.C., where she lobbied in support of research funding for Type 1 diabetes; Amanda's mom Martha Bloom, who helps Amanda manage her condition; Jen Foster, the Northern New England Development Coordinator for JDRF; and Sanjoy Dutta, who works on research development for JDRF. Broadcast live on Friday, July 28, 2017 at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m. Continue reading >>

Cure For Type 1 Diabetes A Step Closer

Cure For Type 1 Diabetes A Step Closer

Research into a possible cure for type 1 diabetes has taken an "important step forward," according to the latest research by scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The study, which was published in journals Nature Medicine and Nature Biotechnology on Monday, builds on work by the Harvard Stem Cell Institute which last year discovered a way of creating beta cells (whose primary function is to store and release insulin) which could then be implanted in mice and, it is hoped in future, humans with diabetes. Now, in the latest development, scientists and researchers at MIT and Harvard, in collaboration with other university experts, have developed an implantable device that could prevent those implanted insulin-producing cells from being attacked by the immune system for six months – effectively allowing the insulin-producing cells to do their job. Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system kills off the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Daily injections of insulin are the primary treatment, but are only partially successful in regulating patients' metabolism. If a device could be implanted into diabetics that could prevent those insulin-producing cells from being attacked, it could be a huge leap forward in terms of research. The results could have an impact on health provision around the world as diabetes ranks as one of the leading causes of death in America. Type 1 diabetes differs from type 2, where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. Pregnant women can also develop a usually more short-term form of gestational diabetes. Diabetes affect Continue reading >>

Cultivating A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Cultivating A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

JDRF and Lilly Canada fund UHN research on new stem cell therapies aimed at eliminating the need for insulin injections This research involves the cultivation and manipulation of human embryonic stem cells to generate glucose-responsive insulin-producing pancreatic cells. Packaging these bioengineered cells into small devices and transplanting them under the skin may provide an ideal vascular environment, where the cells will receive oxygen and nutrients needed to survive and produce insulin. “This approach will not only accelerate the development, survival, and functionality of insulin-producing cells,” stated Dr. Aghazadeh, “but also lay the foundation for a novel cellular treatment for type 1 diabetes.” Recently, results seen from the transplantation of pancreatic progenitors or beta-like cells include recipients being able to reduce the number of insulin injections, or no longer needing insulin. “It is our hope that this research will identify a practical and clinically relevant procedure to effectively treat diabetes with cells derived from stem cells,” said Dave Prowten, president and CEO, JDRF Canada. “We are pleased to provide assistance for this research, with the hope that it will eventually lead to an effective, more widely available therapeutic procedure for people living with type 1 diabetes.” The availability of transplantable stem cell-derived pancreatic cells could lead to a treatment option that the majority of people with T1D could access. About Lilly Canada Eli Lilly and Company is a global healthcare leader that unites caring with discovery to make life better for people around the world. We were founded more than a century ago by Colonel Eli Lilly, who was committed to creating high quality medicines that meet people’s needs, and t Continue reading >>

Us Facility Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes Within Six Years

Us Facility Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes Within Six Years

A diabetes research facility in the US has set the goal of curing type 1 diabetes within six years. The City of Hope's Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute, based in California, is aiming to cure type 1 diabetes using $50 million (£40m) of funding from the Wanek family, who owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the world's largest home furniture manufacturer. City of Hope will be collaborating with the Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes on the six-year project, using an integrated approach to curing type 1 diabetes. These techniques include: Immunotherapy: Unlocking the immune system's role within diabetes and how stem cell-based therapies could reverse the immune attack on pancreatic beta cells Beta cell transplantation: Improving ways of boosting beta cells and encouraging their long-term survival following transplantation Preventing diabetes complications: Intervening at a genetic level to reverse complications and predict their development Dr Bart Roep, director of City of Hope's research team, says that the key to curing type 1 diabetes will be to understand what causes it to develop. From there, research can begin on treatments, which could vary from person to person. "[It's] something we call personalised medicine or precision medicine, which is very much in vogue in cancer. That means we need to understand where patients differ and then tailor the immune therapies to their specific needs," said Roep. Robert W. Stone, president and chief executive officer at City of Hope, added: "City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge. This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes." City of Hope is an independent research and treatment centre for diabetes, cancer and other life-threatening Continue reading >>

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