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How To Advocate For Friends And Family In Jail And Prison

How To Advocate For Friends And Family In Jail And Prison

How to Advocate for Friends and Family in Jail and Prison Posted on March 9, 2018 by American Diabetes Association Recently, the American Diabetes Association requested to join a lawsuit concerning the failure to provide adequate diabetes care to prisoners at the Trousdale Turner Correctional Facility in Tennessee. It is far too common for jails and prisons fail to meet the basic needs of people with diabetes, with horrible consequences for peoples health and well-being. An essential part of our mission is to advocate for all people with diabetes, no matter their circumstances. People who are incarcerated across the nation too often receive inadequate diabetes care, putting their health and even their lives at risk. It is extremely scary not only for the person with diabetes, but also for their family and friends. In a jail or prison, people often have little or no control over how they manage their diabetes. They are completely dependent on the jail or prison staff to provide their medications (including insulin), blood sugar checks, screening and treatment for complications, and access to visit with a doctor or other health care provider to help them manage their diabetes. Common issues individuals who are incarcerated face: Problems with insulin type. It is common for jails and prisons to use an NPH and Regular insulin regimen to treat diabetesbut most people with diabetes dont use those kinds of insulin. They are used to managing their diabetes with long-acting and fast-acting insulins. This change in insulin can result in fluctuations in blood sugar, including more frequent high blood sugars and sudden low blood sugars. This causes concerns about diabetes-related medical complications, both short- and long-term. Problems with insulin delivery. Often, for any numbe Continue reading >>

Perl Study

Perl Study

In people with diabetes, blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Over time, the high blood sugar can damage the kidneys. If this happens, waste and fluids build up in the blood instead of being filtered out of the body by the kidneys. Kidney damage from diabetes (known as diabetic nephropathy) begins without symptoms. Early signs are increases in serum creatinine (detected by a blood test) or increased amounts of albumin or protein in the urine (detected by urine tests). If the damage continues, the kidneys may fail and result in the need for dialysis or kidney transplant. In fact, diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure in the United States. This may happen in up to 15% of people with type 1 diabetes. Controlling blood sugar and blood pressure can slow down kidney damage or keep it from getting worse. Use of certain blood pressure medicines, such as ACE inhibitors (for example, lisinopril or ramipril), may also help protect kidney function in people with diabetes. However, despite these approaches, the risk of kidney failure in type 1 diabetes remains, and new treatments are urgently needed. Recent research has shown that people with type 1 diabetes who have blood uric acid levels higher than average are at increased risk of losing kidney function. Therefore, a promising approach is to use treatments to lower the level of uric acid in the blood. Researchers believe that reducing uric acid levels using a drug called allopurinol (used for many years as a treatment for gout) may help protect kidney function. Promising results have been seen in a few small studies, but these need to be confirmed by larger studies that include more people carefully followed over a longer period of time. The Preventing Early Renal Loss (PERL) in Diabetes Consortium is a group Continue reading >>

Diabetes Journals Mobile

Diabetes Journals Mobile

Effective 31 December 2016, ADA journals will no longer publish new content to the ADA Journals Mobile App. We encourage users to access our journal content via our mobile websites at . We apologize for any inconvenience. Get instant access to the premier professional journals of the American Diabetes Association:Diabetes,Diabetes Care,Clinical Diabetes, Diabetes Spectrum.ADAjournals are available on your mobile device through the "diabetes journals" app for iOS and Android, and the websites are optimized for viewing on your smartphone or other handheld device. With the ADA Journals'mobile app, subscribers can access the latest diabetes research published in the Association's high-impact scientific and medical journals.The mobile app's streamlined design provides one place on your mobile device for accessing, browsing, reading, and sharing full-text articles. In addition, users may cache article content for later reading when no Internet connection is available. Continue reading >>

Ada Washington State (@adawashington) On Twitter

Ada Washington State (@adawashington) On Twitter

Our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. Did you learn yesterday that you're at an increased risk for developing diabetes? Be sure to schedule an appointment with your doctor - only your provider can tell you if you have #diabetes or not. Here are some tips that can help lower the risk: bit.ly/2I5Lp0k pic.twitter.com/ow3LHHob84 Replying to @SeattleMamaDoc @WADeptHealth Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in WA. Take the test and know your risk #diabetesalertday @wadepthealth Thank you to our 2018 #WATourdeCure Signature Sponsor @NWKidney ! Team NKC is ready to ride and walk for #diabetes awareness! People living with #diabetes are at a greater risk of developing #kidneydisease . NWKC works with patients to manage diabetes and prevent #kidneydisease . pic.twitter.com/XGCtyWWVbn Have you heard the debate over #T2D treatment guidelines? We stand by our current guidelines that are backed by proven research, and reject the ACP's new recommendations. Read more about the debate and an interview with @AmDiabetesAssn 's own Dr. Cefalu. n.pr/2oUeSCy Hey #easternWA There's going to be a health and wellness fair on Saturday, March 17 from 10am-2pm at Medical Lake Middle School. One of our ADA Ambassadors will be presenting a #Diabetes 101 workshop, and there will be health screenings available. Don't miss out! pic.twitter.com/SfcHJjdBbO Wow - thanks @QFCGrocery We're QFC's "charity of the month." All month long when you stop in your local QFC, you can make a donation to the @AmDiabetesAssn when you check out. Many thanks to QFC for being a proud partner in the fight against #Diabetes pic.twitter.com/GSbCo580aA Continue reading >>

Pumpkin Risotto (risotto Di Zucca)

Pumpkin Risotto (risotto Di Zucca)

The traditional butter and cream in this recipe have been replaced with olive oil and yogurt. With pumpkin, the risotto achieves a creamy consistency without the extra fat. Choices/Exchanges: 2 1/2 Starch, 1 Fat Dinner Holidays & Entertaining Sides Vegetarian Italian In a heavy-bottomed saucepan, warm the oil over medium heat. When the oil is hot, add the onion and saut until tender, about 3-5 minutes, but do not let the onion brown. Add the rice and the pumpkin, and stir. Add the wine. Stir and cook until the wine evaporates. Add just enough stock to cover the rice. Mix slowly, making sure the rice does not stick to the bottom of the pan. Once the stock is nearly absorbed, add more stock to cover. Repeat this process until the rice has absorbed all the broth, about 18-19 minutes. The rice should be cooked through with a slightly chewy texture. Remove risotto from heat. Add the parmigiano-reggiano and yogurt. Mix vigorously until the risotto is well blended and has a creamy texture. Continue reading >>

Ada 2017 Roundup: Photo Ban Causes Stir Among Conference Attendees

Ada 2017 Roundup: Photo Ban Causes Stir Among Conference Attendees

ADA 2017 Roundup: Photo ban causes stir among conference attendees Many scientific conferences have embraced the technological age, creating hashtags for attendees to share content on Twitter and engage with one another. Some conferences even acknowledge attendees with powerful social media presences by giving them special ribbons and including their Twitter handles on their name badges. But at this years meeting of the American Diabetes Association, the conferences official hashtag was dominated by angry attendees protesting a seemingly old-school policy: attendees were not allowed to post photos from presentations on Twitter. 2017ada threatens a strong educational movement of open sharing across all medical meetings, Dr. Neil Floch wrote . Some pointed out on Twitter that sharing data online is an important resource for doctors who arent able to be at the meeting in person and that encouraging communication among attendees could help spur new research ideas. The ADAs official policy claimed that by registering for the conference, attendees gave the ADA the perpetual, global and royalty-free right to record, photograph and use anything from the conference. The policy didnt sit well with many on Twitter. ADA2017 : If you claim your are protecting presenters intellectual property why do you state that you alone are free to use it as below, Dr. C. Michael Gibson tweeted . Gibson, who has a sizeable online presence, tweeted several times using the conferences hashtag to express his dissatisfaction with the rule. Some presenters attempted to circumvent the policy, tweeting that attendees were welcome to take pictures and share their presentations online. People come present their data in a public forum because they want to share their research & promote their work, not hid Continue reading >>

5k@ada

[email protected]

Help set the pace for changing diabetes by running or walking the 5K route in Orlando! Join us in Orlando for the [email protected] on Sunday, June 24, 2018! The [email protected] brings together citizens of Orlando and ADA attendees to emphasize the need for increased physical activity to help prevent diabetes and diabetes complications. This disease awareness activity provides participants with the opportunity to raise public awareness about the importance of a healthy lifestyle in preventing and controlling diabetes. Through Novo Nordisk's continued support of the American Diabetes Association, the [email protected] in Orlando will be free of charge to Orlando citizens and registered 78th Scientific Sessions attendees. Take the first step towards a healthier lifestyle: Over 1,399 people completed the [email protected] last year in San Diego. This year, we hope to activate even more, so bring your friends along for an early morning run or walk! We look forward to seeing you in Orlando! [email protected] proudly sponsored by Novo Nordisk. Continue reading >>

Ada To Re-evaluate Tweet Ban After Backlash

Ada To Re-evaluate Tweet Ban After Backlash

ADA to re-evaluate tweet ban after backlash The American Diabetes Association says itwill re-evaluateits policy ofbanning photos and tweets of slides during presentations, afterabacklash at its annual congress. The #2017ADA and#ADA2017hashtags showsangerat thestrong arm tactics,whichhas overshadowed many of the discussions at the conference. ADA says the measures are meant to prevent unauthorised sharing of copyrighted and (in some cases)as-yet unpublished medical data. But critics say the policy is hopelessly outdated in the age of social media, andblocks all the benefits of rapid, open sharing of data. ADA went as far as having members of staff on hand during presentations to enforce the rules, which more or less banned photos or tweets containing slides at the conference without accreditation. In ADAs defence, other major healthcare conferences have introduced similar policies and there was also a work-around available whereby members of the press could apply, several weeks in advance, for photo accreditation. But this did not stop widespread anger from those attending who advocate sharing of knowledge and ideas on social media, with many threatening to take photos of slides, or retweet them, in protest. Unprecedented tweetstorm by the medical community against information sharing policy by @AmDiabetesAssn #2017ADA Insulin Nation (@InsulinNation) June 9, 2017 In its Photography and Audiovisual Recording Policy, the ADA states: Taking photos of or recordingthe content of meeting room slides, poster presentations, and supporting materials is prohibited, considered intellectualpiracy, and unethical. Attendees who ignore this policy will be at risk of losing their badge credentials. Journalists attending are also allowed to use voice recorders to assist with reporting, Continue reading >>

Americas Diabetes Challenge

Americas Diabetes Challenge

The information you provide will be available to the Merck & Co., Inc., family of companies (collectively, Merck) and others working on behalf of Merck, and according to the same standards, to provide the information and services you request. Personal information about you will not otherwise be disclosed for marketing purposes without your permission. Merck reviews personal information and nonidentifiable information not only to provide the requested information and services but also to develop and offer additional services and communications that we believe our customers might find of interest. Merck also may use personal information to audit its resources for compliance and security purposes. For more information about how Merck protects personal information about you, please read the Internet Privacy Policy and the Privacy Statement for patients, consumers, and caregivers . The materials displayed on this website are protected by copyright, trademark, and other intellectual property laws. Before uploading a story to www.AmericasDiabetesChallenge.com, carefully read the following Terms and Conditions of use. Uploading any narrative, caption, photo or video through this website constitutes your acceptance of the Terms and Conditions of use outlined herein. By uploading a story, you are giving Merck, its affiliates and licensees permission, to use, or edit, your experience (or story), at their discretion, on this website and in other promotional or marketing materials developed by Merck. Once submitted, it can become available for viewing by any other person for as long as the website is published and any copies of published materials are in circulation. Note, if further information is needed about your story, you may be notified via the contact information you provide Continue reading >>

Many Schools Failing On Type 1 Diabetes Care

Many Schools Failing On Type 1 Diabetes Care

Health |Many Schools Failing on Type 1 Diabetes Care Quintarius Monroe, who has Type 1 diabetes, checks his blood sugar before football practice at Woodlawn High School in Birmingham, Ala. Credit Bob Miller for The New York Times With twin boys ready for school, Jason and Jessica Pollard braced for paperwork, parent-teacher meetings and shopping trips for supplies. But they were not prepared for the reception their son, Owen, then 5, received from school administrators. Officials at their neighborhood kindergarten and a nearby private academy said he would not be allowed to attend because he has Type 1 diabetes . The Pollards, doctors in Seattle, were flabbergasted. One headmaster said that Owen would never be accepted because of his disability. It took everything in me not give him the middle finger, said Dr. Jessica Pollard, a pediatric oncologist. The Pollards are hardly the first family to face this kind of discrimination. Too many schools are failing to provide the growing number of students who have Type 1 diabetes with the routine care they need, such as insulin shots or blood sugar monitoring, federal regulators and diabetes experts say. And often, parents do not know they have the legal right to insist on it. The incidence of Type 1 diabetes among children has increased by 21 percent in recent years. In 2009, an estimated 167,000 children had the disease, according to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In nearly 400 cases since 2011, parents have brought complaints to federal authorities about schools that decline to care for these students. Experts say the number vastly understates the problem in public and private education ( Share your own experience here) . Many children have been barred from attending their zoned schoo Continue reading >>

Hard Lessons: The American Diabetes Association Social Media Photo Ban

Hard Lessons: The American Diabetes Association Social Media Photo Ban

Hard Lessons: The American Diabetes Association Social Media Photo Ban This past weekend, the American Diabetes Association set off a tweetstorm when it forbade the sharing of photos via Twitter during its 77th Scientific Sessions . The intention was to protect scientific research that had not yet been published but might be shared in sessions and subsequently disseminated on social media. Yet the far-reaching ban had a more deleterious effect. Their media blackout was decried as a strong arm tactic , and attendees were infuriated they couldnt share what they had learned. Others encouraged the Association to join the 21st century while others shared political cartoons and memes. It became the biggest story of the Sessionslarger than the research and progress itself. Sandeep Thekkepat said it best: @AmDiabetesAssn disservice to professionals and people with diabetes by restrictive social media policy. This is THE story of #2017ADA A tweet shared by Amanda Jane Saunders-Johnston regarding the decision. As I shared on my own Twitter , it is my opinion that conference, class, and course tweets are important for engagement, learning, interaction & networking. Thats part of why the very idea of the shared conference hashtag came about, and why its so valuable. This theory has been preliminarily backed up by a recent study done by Hendrick Borgmann, MD, Sasha DeWitt, MD, and others. Conducted at two separate urological conferences, the research found that, Among 312 total respondents, the greatest perceived benefits of Twitter among users were for networking (97%) and disseminating information (96%), followed by research (75%), advocacy (74%) and career development (62%). In total, 65% of Twitter users have dealt with guidelines on online medical professionalism and 71% of ph Continue reading >>

Ada Adapts New Social Media Policy To Avoid Twitter Rage

Ada Adapts New Social Media Policy To Avoid Twitter Rage

ADA Adapts New Social Media Policy to Avoid Twitter Rage The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is making changes to their social media policy ahead of this year's annual conference in Orlando, Florida, in June, in a bid to avoid the controversy they found themselves mired in last year. Attendees of the 2017 conference in San Diego, California, were restricted from posting any photos or information from speaker sessions to their social media accounts per official ADA policy. Conference goers did not react well to the ban, immediately taking to Twitter to express anger and frustration over the seemingly draconian constraints. Many said they regarded the rule as an unethical attempt to maintain a monopoly on data and educational effort. "Those in power are counting on you to NOT speak up & to comply. Stop deleting, Start tweeting, Don't be thanked for ur compliance," C Michael Gibson, MD, an interventional cardiologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, tweeted several times during ADA last year to his more than 300,000 Twitter followers. His posts received brisk engagement that expressed universal agreement with his views. The flood of negative reactions dominated Twitter conversations about the conference. The phrases "Freethetweet," "ludditeofthemonth," and "freedomoftweech" were just as often associated with the conference's official hashtag, #2017ADA, as phrases like "insulin," "mortality," and "changingdiabetes," according to the Twitter analytics site keyhole.co . This year, the ADA will allow speakers to have the final say on whether or not to allow attendees to tweet and post from the presentations. "Photography will be at the discretion of each study author and will be announced by each author at the start of their presentation. Ea Continue reading >>

Win Ada | American Diabetes Association

Win Ada | American Diabetes Association

WIN ADA has two events planned for the 78th Scientific Sessions in Orlando, FL: WIN ADA Networking Reception Friday, June 22, 2018, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Join us for the WIN ADA Networking Reception, which will be held in the third level foyer outside of the Chapin Theater at the Orange County Convention Center. During this event, you will have the opportunity to hear from andmingle withleading women in diabetes. Recipients of the 2018 WIN ADA Awards will also be announced, and complimentary hors d'oeuvres and beverages will be provided. Current and prospective WIN ADA members are welcome to attend.This event was made possible thanks to the generous support of Medtronic Diabetes. Overcoming Gender Gaps in ScienceMini-Symposium Monday, June 25, 2018, 12:00-1:00 p.m. This mini-symposium will be an interactive session including a panel discussion.Speakers include Drs. Jane E.B. Reusch, MD,University of Colorado;Felicia Hill-Briggs, PhD, ABPP, Johns Hopkins University;Elizabeth Seaquist, MD, University of Minnesota;and Maureen Gannon, PhD, Vanderbilt University. The session will be held in Rooms W304E-H of the Orange County Convention Center. The Women's Interprofessional Network Advisory Group brings together 15 leading female scientists, clinicians, and educators in diabetes to provide direction on and organize WIN ADA initiatives. Meet the WIN ADA Advisory Group Co-Chairs, Jane E.B. Reusch, MD and Darleen Sandoval, PhD. Continue reading >>

A Perfect Twitter Storm: Why Is The Ada So Antisocial Media?

A Perfect Twitter Storm: Why Is The Ada So Antisocial Media?

A Perfect Twitter Storm: Why Is the ADA So AntiSocial Media? SAN DIEGO Meeting attendees are pushing back against the enforcement of severe restrictions on social media posts that discuss the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2017 Scientific Sessions taking place here this week. Since the meeting began on Friday, June 9, many of the attendees' Twitter posts, including photographs from sessions, have been met by a polite yet firm appeal from the ADA asking them to delete their tweet. "Thanks for joining us at #2017ADA! Photography isn't allowed during presentations we'd appreciate it if you would delete this tweet," reads a typical Twitter response from the ADA's official handle, @AmDiabetesAssn. Twitter users immediately began expressing anger and frustration over the seemingly draconian attempts to limit social media conversations at the association's scientific sessions. Many say they see it as an unethical attempt to maintain a monopoly on data and educational effort. "Those in power are counting on you to NOT speak up & to comply. Stop deleting, Start tweeting, Don't be thanked for ur compliance," C Michael Gibson, MD, an interventional cardiologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, tweeted several times to his more than 300,000 Twitter followers. One prompted a long string of replies in agreement, as well as 150 likes and 90 retweets. Similar posts are also receiving brisk engagement. At times, the flood of negative reaction has dominated conversations about the conference on Twitter. The phrases "Freethetweet," "ludditeofthemonth," and "freedomoftweech" were just as often associated with the conference's official hashtag, #2017ADA, as phrases like "insulin," "mortality," and "changingdiabetes," according to the Twitter analytics si Continue reading >>

Ada Policy On Photos, Videos, Twitter Sparks Controversy

Ada Policy On Photos, Videos, Twitter Sparks Controversy

ADA Policy on Photos, Videos, Twitter Sparks Controversy Association asked meeting-goers to delete tweets of presentation slides by Joyce Frieden Joyce Frieden, News Editor, MedPage Today SAN DIEGO -- Reporters who cover medical meetings are used to certain restrictions: No unauthorized photos or videos at the meeting. No photos in the exhibit hall. But this year's photo and video -- and social media -- policy at the American Diabetes Association's annual meeting here caused more than the usual stir. "Information shared by presenters during the Scientific Sessions is often unpublished data. Taking photos of or recording the content of meeting room slides, poster presentations, and supporting materials is prohibited, considered intellectual piracy, and unethical," reads the policy on the ADA's meeting website . "Attendees who ignore this policy will be at risk of losing their badge credentials." ADA employees were in the rooms during meeting sessions to make sure no one took unauthorized photos of presenters' slides, and meeting attendees took to Twitter to voice their concerns. "Wow, never seen such an effort to diminish knowledge sharing. The photo enforcers are everywhere," tweeted Jake Mathon, a healthcare consultant, on the hashtag #2017ADA. "How to take an outdated no-photos policy to the next level of ridiculous: enforce it in a session on *open innovation*," tweeted Holly Witteman, PhD, of Laval University in Quebec City. ADA also asked people who tweeted photos of presentation slides to delete those tweets, which drew more criticism. "There's no question that legally the @AmDiabetesAssn can ban tweeting of photos of #2017ADA slides," tweeted Jeremy Faust, MD, an emergency physician from Boston. "It's just idiotic. That's the issue." Some meeting presenters open Continue reading >>

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