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A1cnow Plus

1xtest A1cnow Plus Do Kontroli Hba1c

1xtest A1cnow Plus Do Kontroli Hba1c

Koszt wysyki:od 9,99 z Dostpne formy wysyki dla ogldanego produktu:Kurier DPD, przesyka ubezpieczona. - 13,50 z Oferta A1CNow+ 10 sztuk - Kurier DPD, Transport w opakowaniu termicznym. - 24,00 z InPost Paczkomaty24 (wysyamy w poniedziaki, rody lub pitki) - 9,99 z Odbir osobisty. Potwierd dostpno produktu, moe zosta doliczona dodatkowa kwota podczas odbioru osobistego. - 0,00 z Zestaw A1CNow+10 pozwala na wykonanie 10 oznacze poziomu hemoglobiny glikowanej A1C. Monitor A1CNow+ przeznaczony jest do zastosowa profesjonalnych, majcych na celu monitorowanie kontroli glikemii u osb z cukrzyc. Umoliwia przeprowadzenie ilociowych pomiarw procentowej zawartoci hemoglobiny glikowanej (%A1C lub %HbA1c) w prbkach krwi kapilarnej np. z opuszki palca, lub krwi ylnej penej. Przenone, porczne urzdzenie, ktre jest atwe w obsudze, nie posiada adnych przecznikw czy przyciskw i ulega samoczynnej aktywacji po umieszczeniu kasety testowej. Do wykonania badania potrzebna jest niewielka ilo krwi. Wyniki uzyskiwane s w cigu paru minut. Natychmiastowa informacja zwrotna i biece omwienie z pacjentem wyniku pomiaru HbA1c poprawia kontrol glikemii u pacjentw z cukrzyc oraz jego motywacj do przestrzegania zalece terapeutycznych. W ten sposb umoliwia lepsze leczenie choroby i redukcj poziomu HbA1c nawet o 1%,co zmniejsza ryzyko rozwoju przewlekych powika. Warto procentowa A1C monitoruje kontrol stenia glukozy w cigu ostatnich trzech miesicy. Okoo 50% wyniku stanowi poziom A1C z ostatnich 30 dni, 25% pochodzi z ostatnich 30-60 dni, a okoo 25% z ostatnich 60-120 dni. W zalenoci od zastosowanej metodyki testu, metody laboratoryjne wykazuj, e wartoci referencyjne dla badania A1C to okoo 4,0-6,5 % Od 6 do 9% u osb z dobrze i umiarkowanie kontrolowan cukrzyc. U osb ze sabo kontrolowan cukrzyc poziom ten m Continue reading >>

The Key Diabetes Test Bites The Dust

The Key Diabetes Test Bites The Dust

A spokesperson for Bayer Diabetes Care today confirmed that the company will stop making the device that is the best way we have to check our key blood glucose level. When I called Susan Yarin, the spokesperson for Bayer’s diabetes care business, I asked her about the rumor that Bayer would stop making the A1CNow device at the end of the year. This device is the only way that we have to check our A1C levels at home and get immediate results. "It’s not a rumor," Ms. Yarin replied. "I can confirm it." She told me that Bayer would be closing down the facility that produces the A1CNow at the end of the year. A1CNow units "will be available as long as supplies are available." I told her that I was dismayed and that, since I check my A1C level on the first day of every month, I had just ordered A1CNow+ units that Bayer makes for professionals. This is the same as the A1CNow SelfCheck that Bayer makes for patients and sells in pharmacies, except the professional version includes 10 tests while the patient version includes two tests. I purchased the 10-pack kit (1 monitor and 10 test cartridges) from A1CTest for $129.00 plus $8.95 shipping and handling. That works out to $13.80 per test. Most pharmacies sell the A1CNow SelfCheck for about $30, which is $15 per test plus tax. David Kliff, the publisher of "Diabetic Investor," broke the bad news. Yesterday, Forbes published his report, "Another Diabetes Device Bites The Dust." If you test as often as I do, the A1CNow+ makes sense. Otherwise, the A1CNow SelfCheck is the way to go. "The expiration date of the A1CNow+ is one year, when you keep it refrigerated, so I would assume that it is good for 18 months, because it does not self-destruct on that date," Pharmacist Steve Freed told me. He is the owner of the A1CTest site, whe Continue reading >>

Pts Diagnostics - Medical Diagnostics Products

Pts Diagnostics - Medical Diagnostics Products

3. IDF, Less stringent treatment goals than those noted in the chart above may be appropriate for patients with a history of severe hypoglycemia, patients with limited life expectancies, very young children or older adults, and individuals with comorbid conditions.[1] American Diabetes Association. Executive Summary: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes-2009. Diabetes Care, 32 (S1) 2009, pp. S6-S7. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) was the pivotal trial that provided the link between A1c levels and the risk of diabetes-associated complications. The results of the DCCT shown below are considered definitive for patients with type 1 diabetes. Relative risk increased with A1c for retinopathy, nephropathy, and microalbuminuria, and the risk of retinopathy and nephropathy accelerated at the highest levels of A1c. In this study, improved glycemic control following intensive diabetes therapy delayed the onset and slowed the progression of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. [1] DCCT A1c levels and the risk of complications in type 1 diabetes Adapted from DCCT. Diabetes 1995;44:968-43. The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) was a large-scale trial that investigated the effect of intensive blood glucose control versus conventional treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a median follow-up of 10 years. This observational analysis of data from the UKPDS demonstrated a direct relationship between the risk of diabetic complications and glycemia over time. Each 1% absolute reduction in mean A1c levels was associated with a 37% decrease in the risk of microvascular complications and a 21% reduction in the risk of any diabetes-related complication or death. Therefore, any improvement in A1c levels Continue reading >>

A1cnow Plus | Novalab - Soluciones En Diabetes Y Diagnstico Rpido

A1cnow Plus | Novalab - Soluciones En Diabetes Y Diagnstico Rpido

Los resultados de hemoglobina glicada, ahora sin esperas Disponer de datos precisos sobre los niveles de HbA1c de su paciente es fundamental para tomar medidas preventivas secundarias a la Diabetes y as evitar complicaciones a largo plazo. Confirmacin del diagnstico, mejoras en las pautas de tratamiento farmacolgico o conversaciones ms detenidas sobre cambios en el estilo de vida. La eficiencia en la clnica va ms all de una visita. Con A1CNow Plus dispondr de una herramienta de gran valor para sea cual sea el momento en que se encuentre su paciente. 1.Buris, C.A., Ashwood, E.R., Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry 3 edicin, WB Saunders Co., 1999 2.Natal D.M. et al. The clinical information value of the glycosylated haemoglobin assay. N Engl J Med 1984; 310; 341-346 3.The DCCT Research Group. The effect of intensive treatment of diabetes on the development and progression of long term complication in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. N Engl J Med 1993, 329; 977 -986 4.Nathan DM, Kuenen J, Borg R, Zheng H, Schoenfeld D, Heine R,. Translating the A1c assay into estimated average glucose values. Diabetes Care. Agosto 2008; 31(8) 5.MLO Supplement. Point of-Care Testing. 1992 6.Cagliero E, Levina EV, Nathan DM. Immediate feedback of A1C levels improves glycemic control in type 1 and insulin-treated type 2. Diabetes Cares 1999; 22(11):1785-1789 7.Goldstein DE, Little RR, Wiedmeyer HM, et al. Glycated Haemoglobin; Mehodologies and clinical applications. Clin Chem 1986, 32:B64-B70 8.American Diabetes Association, Standards of medical care in diabetes-2010. Diabetes Care 2010; 33 (S1), S11 S(61) Sencillo: con 5 L de sangre capilar y de fcil uso Porttil: permite uso en varias consultas Continue reading >>

Central Laboratory Testing (goal A1c Study)

Central Laboratory Testing (goal A1c Study)

DIABETES TECHNOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS Volume 7, Number 6, 2005 © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Glycated Hemoglobin Assessment in Clinical Practice: Comparison of the A1cNow™ Point-of-Care Device with LAURENCE KENNEDY, M.D., F.R.C.P.,1 and WILLIAM H. HERMAN, M.D., M.P.H.2 for the GOAL A1C STUDY TEAM ABSTRACT Background: The Glycemic Optimization with Algorithms and Labs At Po1nt of Care (GOAL A1C) Study assessed the effect of titration monitoring strategies and methods of A1C testing on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes failing oral therapy and beginning basal in- sulin glargine. The availability of both point-of-care (POC) and central laboratory A1C values provided an opportunity to evaluate correlation and statistical agreement between these meth- ods of testing. This analysis forms the basis of the current report. Methods: This is a 24-week, randomized, four-arm, open-label study conducted in 7,758 sub- jects enrolled at 2,130 sites. At baseline, patients had A1C measurements both by POC testing using the A1cNow™ device (Metrika, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA), which applies an immunoassay method, and by central laboratory analysis using ion exchange high-performance liquid chro- matography. These measures were compared statistically. Results: An r value of 0.72 was calculated for POC and laboratory A1C assessments. Although the mean POC A1C values were in agreement with the central laboratory values, there was a large range in individual POC A1C values. Conclusions: POC testing of A1C in predominantly primary care settings using the A1cNow device was correlated with central laboratory results. The correlation was less than expected based on each method’s reproducibility data. Although there was agreement between the aver- age POC A1C values and the Continue reading >>

Does Anyone Know If Ac1now Is Actualy In Procduction ?

Does Anyone Know If Ac1now Is Actualy In Procduction ?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Does anyone know if AC1NOW is actualy in procduction ? lost trust in blood draw people due to fully documented nerve damage due to "I cant find it lets stab around for a laugh" attitude But we all need a a1c reading so I need a method Administrator Family member Well-Known Member There's also been this is the news recently: ^ Believe that is the A1C Now - not sure if it works as not read any literature to support it, but definitely worth checking out, especially if you can find a review! @AndBreathe buys hba1c tests to use between her annual doc test. Maybe she can provide a link? JohnEGreen Type 2 (in remission!) Expert Well you learn something every day I did not even know you could by a self test kit for A1c Also, if you get the test done at your Diabetes clinic appointment, they now take the blood using a finger prick for the test. Also, if you get the test done at your Diabetes clinic appointment, they now take the blood using a finger prick for the test. Not in my neck of the woods. Still done by vampire in time honoured fashion (as done on Monday) Not sure about the Bayer A1c Now but on Amazon there are quite a few HbA1c tests There's also been this is the news recently: ^ Believe that is the A1C Now - not sure if it works as not read any literature to support it, but definitely worth checking out, especially if you can find a review! ETA: The link above is to a blog,i.e. someones personal opinion. Having said that it seems to be well researched and reasonably written. it is old info now, STOP PRESS. Forbes magazine is reporting that Bayer has ceased production of this device and has closed the Metrika plant. it seems Bayer may have wanted to r Continue reading >>

A1cnow®+ System

A1cnow®+ System

Lab Quality Results at the Point-of-Care The A1CNow+ system provides healthcare professionals with a fast and easy way of obtaining accurate A1C results with just a fingerstick. This innovative technology enables clinicians to communicate face-to-face with patients about their diabetes control in minutes, not days. In addition, the A1CNow+ system is fully reimbursable. More Efficient than the Lab Portable - use in multiple exam rooms Easy to use - minimal training required Certifications​ FDA-cleared CE References: 1. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Professional Procedure Guide PN 91078 Rev. B. March 2014. 2. Relative to TOSOH certified reference method. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Preliminary Performance Data, May 30, 2014. Data on file. 3. Exhibits a linear dynamic range and precision that meets current NGSP standards. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Preliminary Performance Data, May 30, 2014. Data on file. 4. Excellent Precision of 2.15% CV and 4.3% CV at the Normal (5.7% HbA1c) and High (8.9% HbA1c) ends of the spectrum. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Preliminary Performance Data, May 30, 2014. Data on file. Complimentary Whitepaper Download Point-of-Care Alternatives to A1C Testing ​Ease-of-use point-of-care medical devices provide an advantage in measuring HbA1c in situations where clinical laboratory analyzers are unavailable to provide physicians with real-time information to better manage diabetes. The purpose of this whitepaper is to help healthcare professionals understand the viability of portable, point-of-care A1C monitors. What you will learn from this whitepaper: How point-of-care devices are viable alternatives to sending blood to laboratory testing Point-of-care A1C device accuracy evaluations relative to three clinical laboratory HbA1c analyzers Continue reading >>

Another Diabetes Device Bites The Dust

Another Diabetes Device Bites The Dust

has learned that Bayer BAYRY +0% will be closing the production facility for its A1CNow product and cease all production by the end of the year. For those new to the wacky world of diabetes, back in 2006 Bayer acquired privately held Metrika, the makers of the A1CNow. Back in the day the A1CNow was the only at home A1C test on the market and the acquisition was generally viewed as a positive step for Bayer. Yet as so often happens in the wacky world of diabetes devices great products get ruined by inept management. Before Bayer ran Metrika into the ground, something that’s normally the domain of Abbott (NYSE:ABT) who has run not one but two glucose monitoring companies into the ground, the possibility existed that sales of the A1cNow could also drive sales of test strips for Bayer’s line of conventional glucose monitors. Before this disaster unfolded Diabetic Investor was very public with our belief that an A1C result was the simplest test result for a patient to understand, a result of 7 or below was good, above 7 not as good. Heck, even the geniuses who ran Bayer should have been able to see that. The thought was Bayer with their scale, yes at one time the company did have scale in the BGM market, could use the A1CNow as an engagement tool for patients who weren’t testing their glucose or weren’t testing as often as they should. Basically the A1CNow would be the patient’s baby step into testing their glucose on a regular basis. As Diabetic Investor noted on more than one occasion with the proper marketing effort Bayer could have educated patients as to the correlation between regular glucose monitoring and A1C. Yet once again the company never had a clear strategy for what do with the A1CNow and without a strategy wound up running in circles going nowhere in Continue reading >>

A1cnow Systems Product Overview

A1cnow Systems Product Overview

A1CNow® Systems Offer Fast & Easy A1C Results A1CNow systems provide a fast and easy way of obtaining accurate A1C results (2- to 3-month glucose control average) in the office or home. The A1CNow+ professional version offers a choice of a 10-count package or a 20-count package. The home version, A1CNow SELF CHECK, comes in a convenient 2-test pack with all the items you need to complete both tests. What is HbA1c or A1C? The term HbA1c refers to glycated hemoglobin. It develops when hemoglobin, a protein within red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout your body, joins with glucose in the blood, becoming ‘glycated.' By measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), clinicians are able to get an overall picture of what our average blood sugar levels have been over a period of 2 to 3 months. For people with diabetes this is important as the higher the HbA1c, the greater the risk of developing diabetes-related complications. HbA1c is also referred to as hemoglobin A1C or simply A1C. How often should A1C levels be tested? The answer is that people with diabetes should talk to their physician about how often they should test their A1c. The Mayo Clinic recommends on its website that A1C testing varies dependent on the type of diabetes the person has, the treatment plan and how well the person with diabetes is managing their blood sugar. For example, the A1C test may be recommended: Twice a year if the patient has type 2 diabetes, doesn't use insulin, and the blood sugar level is consistently within target range Three to four times a year if the patient has type 1 diabetes Four times a year if the patient has type 2 diabetes, uses insulin to manage diabetes, or has trouble keeping the blood sugar level within target range People with diabetes may need more frequent A1C tests i Continue reading >>

Point-of-care Hba1c Testing With The A1cnow Test Kit In General Practice Dental Clinics: A Pilot Study Involving Its Accuracy And Practical Issues In Its Use

Point-of-care Hba1c Testing With The A1cnow Test Kit In General Practice Dental Clinics: A Pilot Study Involving Its Accuracy And Practical Issues In Its Use

Go to: In 2010, 18.8 million people in the United States had been diagnosed with diabetes, a condition that is associated with many medical complications, among them neuropathy, retinopathy, and periodontitis.1 In fact, diabetes is a leading cause of renal failure, cardiovascular disease, blindness, and non-traumatic lower limb amputations, and rates of diabetes-related mortality are especially high.1 Of special concern is that 7 million people living with diabetes in the United States were undiagnosed in 2010,1 with the number of undiagnosed people expected to continue to rise.2 Because of the mild or asymptomatic nature of diabetes in its early stages, many individuals have diabetes for several years before being diagnosed.3 By the time of diagnosis, the functioning of beta cells in storing and releasing insulin may have declined substantially,4 and significant damage may already have occurred. Notably, diabetes screening can enable earlier detection, leading to earlier lifestyle changes and/or medication treatment. This may help prevent, delay, and manage the long-term complications of diabetes that reduce quality of life and increase morbidity and mortality.5-15 To facilitate earlier identification of diabetes, some have advocated for opportunistic screening among at-risk persons who present for health care unrelated to diabetes.5,16-20 For example, as emergency department (ED) patients have a high prevalence of unrecognized diabetes.21 especially among minority and vulnerable populations for whom the ED is often used as a safety-net source of medical care,22 the ED may be an important alternate venue for diabetes screening. Other nontraditional sites where persons at risk for diabetes can be screened include optometry offices and pharmacies.23,24 In addition, the h Continue reading >>

Point-of-care Hba1c Testing With The A1cnow Test Kit In General Practice Dental Clinics: A Pilot Study Involving Its Accuracy And Practical Issues In Its Use.

Point-of-care Hba1c Testing With The A1cnow Test Kit In General Practice Dental Clinics: A Pilot Study Involving Its Accuracy And Practical Issues In Its Use.

With millions of at-risk people undiagnosed with pre-diabetes and diabetes, there is a need to identify alternate screening sites for out-of-range glucose values. We examined practical issues and accuracy (relative to High Performance Liquid Chromatography testing in a laboratory) in the use of the A1cNow point of care device for this screening in general practice dental clinics at a large University-based Dental College. Health care professionals obtained evaluable readings for only 70% of the subjects, even after two attempts, and its use according to manufacturer's instructions was often challenging in the busy environment of the dental clinic. At thresholds for pre-diabetes and diabetes established by the American Diabetes Association, sensitivities of the A1cNow kit relative to the HPLC method were 91.9% and 100%, respectively. However, specificities for pre-diabetes and diabetes were 66.7% and 82.4%, respectively, indicating many false positive results. A better strategy for diabetes screening may involve a laboratory-based analysis approach that is patient- and provider-friendly, with minimal burden to the dental team. Continue reading >>

Study: A1c Now Test Is Crap And So Are Many Doctor Office A1c Tests

Study: A1c Now Test Is Crap And So Are Many Doctor Office A1c Tests

A study published in the January issue of the journal, Clinical Chemistry put eight brands of A1c test kits, including the A1c Now test sold in pharmacies and online, through rigorous testing. The other kits were the ones marketed to doctors for use in their offices. You can read an abstract of this study here: Six of Eight Hemoglobin A1c Point-of-Care Instruments Do Not Meet the General Accepted Analytical Performance Criteria. Erna Lenters-Westra1, and Robbert J. Slingerland. Clinical Chemistry 56: 44-52, 2010. First published November 19, 2009; 10.1373/clinchem.2009.130641 The study concluded only two of the eight kits produced clinically valid results. What is most telling, though, is that the study reports: Because of disappointing EP-10 results, 2 of the 8 manufacturers decided not to continue the evaluation. Their test kits were removed from the study after they completed only one of three CLSI protocols that were planned. CLSI stands for "Clinical and Lab Standards Institute." Since four of the six kits that remained in the study ended up with unacceptable results, but must have had good enough results after the first protocol to encourage their manufacturers to keep them in the study, one can only conclude that the kits removed from the study did abysmally. Which meters were withdrawn from the study after they did very poorly at the first level of testing? A1c Now and Quo-test. Of the six remaining kits that completed all three laboratory test protocols, Only the Afinion and the DCA Vantage met the acceptance criteria of having a total CV <3% in the clinically relevant range. The CV is the "Coeeficient of variation." It is the statistic that represents the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean. It's a measure of how widely scattered data is. The larger it Continue reading >>

A1c Now Selfcheck Review

A1c Now Selfcheck Review

Dear friends, welcome to advice4diabetes.com. By creating this web site I was inspired by my friends and my family who believe me, support and encourage in my journey. Without my friends, it will be impossible to create this website. “Man is what he believes” If you interesting find more about me, please follow me by clicking on icons below. FEATURES: Result close to professional lab test Easy to use Takes only 5 min for result CONCLUSION: Great product, easy to use and result is close to labs. Who could think that someday you will have a meter which test A1C at home in 5 min. It still needs improvement in quality and design. Price - affordable. Great Product. Top accuracy. UPDATE: Bayer discontinue A1C Now Selfcheck. Reason? No idea? For more information read here A1C Now SelfCheck meter developed by Bayer Company. The first meter can check A1C at home. Accurate result. Easy to use. PROS: It’s cheap in comparison with all meters for A1C on the market, on sale you can purchase for $30. Includes 2 test kits in one box. Easy to use, simple instruction. Result- I don’t know if this year model was updated or not, but my result was very close to lab result. A1C Now - 6.4% and lab result 6.7% A1C is an expensive blood work, it can cost over $100, you save a lot of $$$$ CONS: Unfortunately, you can’t run control solution to check if device is working properly, it does run through self-checking and when it’s ready you will see the word SMPL. Very sensitive. You must be very precise of collecting amount of blood. No software is available to truck A1C, you can’t upload to computer your results. Continue reading >>

Glycated Hemoglobin Assessment In Clinical Practice: Comparison Of The A1cnow Point-of-care Device With Central Laboratory Testing (goal A1c Study)

Glycated Hemoglobin Assessment In Clinical Practice: Comparison Of The A1cnow Point-of-care Device With Central Laboratory Testing (goal A1c Study)

Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics Vol. 7, No. 6 Glycated Hemoglobin Assessment in Clinical Practice: Comparison of the A1cNow Point-of-Care Device with Central Laboratory Testing (GOAL A1C Study) Background: The Glycemic Optimization with Algorithms and Labs At Po1nt of Care (GOAL A1C) Study assessed the effect of titration monitoring strategies and methods of A1C testing on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes failing oral therapy and beginning basal insulin glargine. The availability of both point-of-care (POC) and central laboratory A1C values provided an opportunity to evaluate correlation and statistical agreement between these methods of testing. This analysis forms the basis of the current report. Methods: This is a 24-week, randomized, four-arm, open-label study conducted in 7,758 subjects enrolled at 2,130 sites. At baseline, patients had A1C measurements both by POC testing using the A1cNow device (Metrika, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA), which applies an immunoassay method, and by central laboratory analysis using ion exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. These measures were compared statistically. Results: An r value of 0.72 was calculated for POC and laboratory A1C assessments. Although the mean POC A1C values were in agreement with the central laboratory values, there was a large range in individual POC A1C values. Conclusions: POC testing of A1C in predominantly primary care settings using the A1cNow device was correlated with central laboratory results. The correlation was less than expected based on each method's reproducibility data. Although there was agreement between the average POC A1C values and the corresponding central laboratory values, the dispersion of individual POC A1C values was large. Thus, we conclude that these two metho Continue reading >>

Review Of A1cnow+ Point-of-care Device For Monitoring Hba1c

Review Of A1cnow+ Point-of-care Device For Monitoring Hba1c

HbA1c values are typically measured by obtaining a venous blood draw in the office or laboratory, which can be time-consuming, costly and inconvenient for the patient. Studies have shown the benefits of rapid HbA1c results at the time of the patient encounter by improving glucose control through intensification of therapy and improvement of HbA1c levels. Point of care HbA1c tests may allow for rapid HbA1c determination, but there must be sufficient evidence supporting their accuracy if they are used to guide therapy. There are currently several HbA1c devices available to both patients and health care providers. Some provide results in minutes, while most require mailing in the sample collection to a laboratory (see table). This column reviews the A1cNow+ monitor (Metrika), a single use, disposable monitor designed for professional use only. Results of clinical trials Studies have been performed by the manufacturer, which compared the A1cNow+ to National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program Certified Laboratories. One study involving 39 patients from a clinic group in Atlanta showed a correlation coefficient of 0.95. Further studies at large clinic groups involving 20 patients and 54 patients demonstrated correlation coefficients of 0.98 and 0.97, respectively. We studied 70 patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes enrolled from three pharmacist-managed diabetes clinics. Patients were required to have a venous blood draw within one week of the point-of-care test. We then evaluated the statistical and clinical significance between the A1cNow+ and a standard lab. Results showed a good correlation between the A1cNow+ and laboratory values with a correlation coefficient of r=0.893. The best correlation between the A1cNow+ and the lab was seen among HbA1c values ranging fro Continue reading >>

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