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How To Lower Your A1c For Insulin Users | Diabetic Connect

How To Lower Your A1c For Insulin Users | Diabetic Connect

There is no magic formula for achieving a "perfect A1c" or super food that will fix blood sugar levels in a flash. The most important thing to remember is that it takes daily dedication and sometimes several months before you will see any significant improvements in your A1c level. Because your A1c results are a reflection of your blood glucose readings over the past three months, ultimately getting a lower A1c is all about keeping your blood glucose under control daily. Eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly are key to keeping your blood sugar under control, but some of these tips may also help you keep your A1c results on target. Take mealtime insulin before eating. The goal of mealtime insulin is to lower your blood glucose level just as your food is raising it so that your numbers dont spike. A study done by the Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes and Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics found that taking bolus (or rapid-acting) insulin 20 minutes prior to a meal resulted in significantly better glucose control than when insulin was given immediately before a meal or 20 minutes after a meal. It may take a little bit of experimenting to find the exact amount of time before a meal that works best for taking your insulin, but timing bolus insulin correctly may greatly help you increase your blood glucose control. Be careful that while you take your mealtime insulin before you eat not to take insulin too long before eating as this can result in hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Also, if your pre-meal blood sugar test is low, you should not give insulin before beginning your meal as you may experience a dangerously low blood sugar. Fine tune basal (or long-action) insulin. Where bolus insulin is meant to counteract blood glucose rises from meals, basal insulin kee Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c definition and facts Hemoglobin A1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells that sugar molecules stick to, usually for the life of the red blood cell (about three months). The higher the level of glucose in the blood, the higher the level of hemoglobin A1c is detectable on red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1c levels correlate with average levels of glucose in the blood over an approximately three-month time period. Normal ranges for hemoglobin A1c in people without diabetes is about 4% to 5.9%. People with diabetes with poor glucose control have hemoglobin A1c levels above 7%. Hemoglobin A1c levels are routinely used to determine blood sugar control over time in people with diabetes. Decreasing hemoglobin A1c levels by 1% may decrease the risk of microvascular complications (for example, diabetic eye, nerve, or kidney disease) by 10%. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be checked, according to the American Diabetic Association, every six months in individuals with stable blood sugar control, and every three months if the person is trying to establish stable blood sugar control. Hemoglobin A1c has many other names such as glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and HbA1c. To explain what hemoglobin A1c is, think in simple terms. Sugar sticks to things, and when it has been stuck to something for a long time it's harder to the get sugar (glucose) off. In the body, sugar sticks too, particularly to proteins. The red blood cells that circulate in the body live for about three months before they die. When sugar (glucose) sticks to these red blood cells by binding to hemoglobin A1c, it gives us an idea of how much glucose has been around in the blood for the preceding three months. Hemoglobin A1c is a minor component of hemoglobin to which gl Continue reading >>

A1c<7

A1c<7

If you didn't notice that November 14 was World Diabetes Day,you didn't miss the big party. We aren't celebrating a cure for the disease yet.But on that auspicious day more than two dozen organizations got together tofocus on the most important measure of control. They launched a national educational campaign to help usreduce the complications of diabetes. How? By improving our average bloodglucose level to less than 7 as measured by the A1c test. This blood test letsus look back over the past two months to see how we have been doing. And we haven't been doing very well at all. The averageAmerican with diabetes probably has an A1c between 8.5 and 9. That's whatNathaniel Clark, M.D., the American Diabetes Association's national vicepresident of clinical affairs told me a few days ago. He represented the ADA atthe press conference that kicked off the Diabetes A1c Initiative. The ADA's goal is for us to reach a level below 7. The newinitiative has the same goal. The normal range for people who don't have diabetes is 4.5 to6.2, according to the UKProspective Diabetes Study . The UKPDS was the biggest and longest study ofpeople with type 2 diabetes ever, a 20-year trial with about 5,000 participants.It is when our levels go above 6.2 that we start getting complications, the UKPDS says. "There is evidence that as you get below 7 you continue to get areduction in the rate of complications," Dr. Clark tells me. "But therelationshipthe cost-benefit ratioas you get below those numbers becomesless and less favorable. For example, if you had an A1c of 9 and you reduced itto 8, you would get a benefit. And that benefit would be substantially greaterthan if you were at 8 and you moved it to 7. As you get below 7 the curve reallyflattens out. In some patients you get more hypoglycemi Continue reading >>

Smeg A1c-7 Cooker & Oven Parts

Smeg A1c-7 Cooker & Oven Parts

Get the Smeg Cooker & Oven parts you need at Partmaster. Our Smeg Cooker & Oven parts range is available for delivery worldwide and for UK customers there is the option of next day delivery on all in stock Smeg Cooker & Oven spare parts. Buy today and save money with a do-it-yourself Smeg Cooker & Oven repair. Smeg A1C-7 Universal Multifit Cooker Control Knob - Silver Includes 1 x Control Knob and 3 x different sized spindles Diameter: 42 (mm) PLEASE NOTE: This universal control knob will look cosmetically different... More information Save 10% if you buy 2 or more - only 3.14 Save 10% if you buy 2 or more - only 3.14 Smeg A1C-7 Universal Multifit Cooker Control Knob - Black Includes 1 x Control Knob 5 x different sized spindles Diameter: 42 (mm) PLEASE NOTE: This universal control knob will look cosmetically different... More information Smeg A1C-7 Adjustable Oven Shelf (390MM TO 560MM WIDE X 320MM DEEP) Dimensions : 350 x 560 x 320 mm Dimensions : 35cm to 56cm adjustable range Universal Adjustable - width can be extended Depth: 32cm Approx Please... More information Smeg A1C-7 Universal Multifit Cooker Control Knob - White PLEASE NOTE: Not recommended for gas appliances PLEASE NOTE: This universal control knob will look cosmetically different to the original knob Includes... More information Save 10% if you buy 2 or more - only 4.49 Save 10% if you buy 2 or more - only 4.49 Also Known As: Circular Element, Round Element Replacement element 2 Turn 2000 watts Height: 215 (mm) Width 193 mm Bracket : 70 mm Tags: 24 mm Make... More information Smeg A1C-7 Universal Grill Pan - 385 X 300mm Includes handle and griddle Dimensions : 385 x 300 (mm) Removable handle - can be stored away when not in use Removable grid - can be used as a cooling... More information Smeg A1C-7 Univ Continue reading >>

Smeg A1c-7 (a1c7), Fiche Technique, Prix Et Avis Consommateurs

Smeg A1c-7 (a1c7), Fiche Technique, Prix Et Avis Consommateurs

SMEG A1C-7 (A1C7), fiche technique, prix et avis consommateurs Prsentation de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 (A1C7) Cuisinire lectrique "piano" en pose libre Plaque vitrocramique qui fonctionne l'lectricit (Opra / Classica) 1 four multifonctions (gril, convection naturelle, chaleur tournante), cavit de 77 L avec nettoyage par catalyse Pour vous aider choisir votre Cuisinire : consultez le guide d'achat des Cuisinires . Fiche Technique Electromenager-Compare* de la SMEG A1C-7 Informations gnrales de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Cuisinire lectrique "piano" (largeur >= 70 cm) Informations sur la table de cuisson de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Informations sur les foyers de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Format : ovale (largeur : 170 mm / profondeur : 265 mm) Informations sur le four de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Catalyse (parois microporeuses qui dtruit les graisses par oxydation) Modes de cuisson du four de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Le fabricant nomme ses modes de cuisson de la manire suivante : Cavit/moufle du four de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Fonctions du four de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Equipements du four de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Porte abattante avec ouverture par barre/poigne. Une vitre thermo-rflchissante de la porte Four clair avec 2 lampes incandescentes de 25 Watts. Fonction disponible : Minuterie de cuisson (avec signal de fin sonore) Panneau de commandes et afficheur de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Boutons et indications du bandeau de commandes : 7 boutons mcaniques Scurits, normes et certifications de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Informations sur les nergies et consommations de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Couleurs et Design de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Dimensions et poids de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 Informations diverses de la cuisinire SMEG A1C-7 * Attention : Les informations prsentes sur cette fiche s Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

Why Raise Your A1c?

Why Raise Your A1c?

Have you been ordered by your doctor to get your A1C (HbA1c) level up? More people are having this confusing experience, as doctors try to implement the 2013 ADA treatment guidelines. Do these orders make sense? Not much, I’d say. What is happening here? In 2012, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) changed the targets doctors should aim for in treating diabetes. They went from a one-size-fits-all target of 7.0% HbA1c to a three-tiered guideline. HbA1c is the test that gives an idea of the average blood glucose level for the previous two months or so. An A1C of 7.0% equals an average blood glucose of around 154 mg/dl, and many people think that number is too high to protect against complications. So there was pressure to lower the guideline. At the same time, many older people found the 7.0% goal too strict. A few studies found an increased risk of falls in older people who run low glucose levels. There was concern about increased risk of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). As Diane Fennell wrote here, many think that aiming for lower A1C levels leads to an increase in low blood glucose episodes. As many readers commented, hypos are dangerous and unpleasant. For many, they are the worst fact of life with diabetes. So the experts finally recognized that one size does not fit all. Unfortunately, their new guidelines have been misunderstood by some doctors, leading to people being told to raise their A1C numbers, even if doing so increases their complication risk. According to the new guidelines, older or sicker people, or those with many hypoglycemic episodes, might shoot for 7.5% to 8.0%. Younger, healthier, people might want to get their A1C below 6.5%, or even lower. People in between on age and health mi Continue reading >>

A1c Test

A1c Test

Print Overview The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well you're managing your diabetes. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications. Why it's done An international committee of experts from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the International Diabetes Federation, recommend that the A1C test be the primary test used to diagnose prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. After a diabetes diagnosis, the A1C test is used to monitor your diabetes treatment plan. Since the A1C test measures your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months instead of your blood sugar level at a specific point in time, it is a better reflection of how well your diabetes treatment plan is working overall. Your doctor will likely use the A1C test when you're first diagnosed with diabetes. This also helps establish a baseline A1C level. The test may then need to be repeated while you're learning to control your blood sugar. Later, how often you need the A1C test depends on the type of diabetes you have, your treatment plan and how well you're managing your blood sugar. For example, the A1C test may be recommended: Once every year if you have prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes Twice a year if Continue reading >>

Diabetes Update: A1c<7

Diabetes Update: A1c<7

This newsletter keeps you up-to-date with new articles, columns, and Web pages that I have written. I list and link most of these on my Diabetes Directory at www.mendosa.com/diabetes.htm From time to time Diabetes Update may also include links to other Web pages of special interest. My most recent contribution is: on December 2, 2002 A1c<7 The folks who sponsor the Diabetes A1c Initiative failed to ask for my support, so I will try to help with what I write about it. The campaign features a team of patient advocates known as A1c Champions who will tour the country and give tips about keeping diabetes under control. If I believe in anything, it is the importance of controlling my diabetes and that regular A1c tests are the best measure that I have to make sure that I am doing that. My A1c had crept up to 6.8 last year. That was enough to get me to ask my endocrinologist to prescribe metformin. My most recent test a few months ago came in at 6.2, precisely the point where the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study says that complications begin. Those A1c Champions who are fated to have to campaign without me seek to persuade the world—or at least all Americans with diabetes—that we have to bring down our A1c levels. Nobody knows exactly, but those levels are typically 8.5 to 9. The Diabetes A1c Initiative that they are campaigning for seeks to bring those levels down to 7. Why not to 6.2 or below? The answers to that are in my column. You can find it at Updates include: on November 20, 2002 GLP-1 One of the most exciting drugs on the horizon for people with type 2 diabetes is AC2993, which in April I wrote about in Diabetes Update Number 36 and my “About the Internet” column for the American Diabetes Association. Amylin Pharmaceuticals now has AC2993 in Phase 3 clinical Continue reading >>

My A1c Is 7.8 Need Some Good Advice

My A1c Is 7.8 Need Some Good Advice

They now have a self check at home thing from Bayer. They give you two tests. Of course I screwed up the first one by not pressing down on the thing the right way and I got no reading. Waiting one hour till the monitor cleared. I am a type 2, used to be morbidly obese, I'm 63 years old and I finally got my act together. I literally grow my own food and I don't chat. I was in the Accord program at Cornell and did very well. Got my a1c down from 9.0 to 6.5. I was on Lantus. At first only 20 units (nothing else), Just the Lantus. It was so hard losing the rest of the weight. Insulin stores in fat cells, this I know. On September 21, my morning fasting level was 118 and my post prandial was 127. I spoke to my doctor (I was on 8 units of the Lantus), and I told him "I'd like to try this via diet alone". He agreed. I also told the people at Cornell what I was doing. They know the way I eat so if it could be done, I'd be the one to do it. So since September 21, I am on no meds at all. If I didn't eat, my sugar would go up, but if I ate, it would go down. It didn't go down good enough for me. Today I did the a1c and it said 7.8. After I went off of Lantus, my sugar went up (in the a.m. ) to 187, and post prandial could be 170 and I even hit 140 one time. But this 7.8 tells me what I need to know. I thought because I lost most of my weight, I would see an a1c of 6. I was wrong. Oh, FYI, I went to eye doctor, have no signs of diabetes at all in my eyes. And I"ve been a diabetic for 23 years. He said "I have never seen this before, you have no signs of diabetes, so whatever you are doing, keep doing it". He also took one look at me and thought I had lap band surgery. I just said "No, I know how to eat and I grow my own food" Oh, I read the back of the a1c box that this test came Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Coalition Applauds New A1c<7% Diabetes Quality-care Measure By Diabetes Physician

National Diabetes Coalition Applauds New A1c<7% Diabetes Quality-care Measure By Diabetes Physician

WASHINGTON, April 7 /PRNewswire/ -- A group of leading experts representing key public health and medical organizations today strongly supported new diabetes quality-care measures that include a measure of A1C<7% for people with diabetes in line with the clinical guidelines established by the American Diabetes Association. The previous measurement was A1C<8%. The new measures are scheduled to take effect this month. The guidelines by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) and the American Diabetes Association for the Diabetes Physician Recognition Program (DPRP) will adopt the new measure as part of performance standards and criteria. The program is a voluntary program for individual physicians or physician groups that provide care to people with diabetes. "An A1C<7% is an important and achievable goal, and can help prevent or reduce the risk of severe health complications related to diabetes, saving lives and healthcare dollars," said James R. Gavin III, M.D., Ph.D., Chair of the National Diabetes Education Program and President of Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta. "Throughout the United States, there are inconsistencies among guidelines, which may be contributing to confusion among physicians and to the epidemic of uncontrolled diabetes." "We are hopeful that further changes will be reflected in other national quality measurement standards such as HEDIS, the Health Plan Employer and Data Information Set, that currently does not define an optimal A1C control level but only reports the percentage of patients in poor control defined as an A1C [greater than or equal to] 9.5%," added Dr. Gavin. A1C, also referred to as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), is a measure of blood glucose (sugar) levels over a two- to three-month period. In people without diabe Continue reading >>

Why Should My A1c Be 7 Per Cent Or Less?

Why Should My A1c Be 7 Per Cent Or Less?

Share: Over the last several years a significant amount of research has proven that control matters, and good control is now defined as an A1C of < 7 per cent. What is an A1C? An A1C test shows your blood glucose control over the last 2 or 3 months. Research from both the Diabetes Control & Complications Trial (DCCT) and its follow up study (EDIC) proves that having an A1C of 7 per cent is definitely worthwhile for persons with type 1 diabetes. Exactly 1441 volunteers aged 13 to 39, all with type 1 diabetes, took part. These people agreed to randomly be assigned to either conventional treatment - taking about two insulin injections a day - or to intensive treatment (IT) - taking either multiple dose insulin (MDI, about 4 injections a day) or an insulin pump. During the study the A1C of each group was compared: the conventional therapy group had an average A1C of 9.1 per cent (normal 4-6 per cent) the intensive therapy group had an average A1C of 7.2 per cent The purpose was to finally demonstrate whether or not good blood sugar control was really important to prevent the complications of diabetes. And indeed it is – as you can see below, complications developed at a much lower rate in the intensively treated group compared to the conventional group. Effect of intensive therapy on: Those with no complications at beginning of study: Those with some complication at beginning of study: Eye Disease (retinopathy) 76% overall reduction 54% less progression 45% less risk of needing laser therapy Kidney Disease (nephropathy) 34% less microalbuminuria 56% less proteinuria Nerve Disease (neuropathy) 69% less occurrence 57% less occurrence Heart Disease Trend towards reduction in risk factors Trend towards reduction in risk factors The reduction in risk for eye disease (the prima Continue reading >>

How To Get A1c Below 7 Percent

How To Get A1c Below 7 Percent

Q: I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about six years ago. In the beginning, I controlled my diabetes with diet and exercise. But last year I started taking glyburide and extended-release metformin. My fasting blood glucose is 150 -- 180 mg/dl, and my last A1C was 7.0 percent. I have to admit that currently I'm not exercising. What do you suggest? A: Right now, your A1C is close to target, but seek the advice of your doctor to see if you should aim for a reduction in your A1C. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends an A1C of below 7 percent and as near to normal (below 6 percent) as possible without running too low. The ADA's target fasting blood glucose range is 70 -- 130 mg/dl. Think of diabetes self-management as a stool with three legs: physical activity, healthful eating, and medications. If you shorten or remove any one of the three legs, the stool won't be level or might even fall over. Your glucose monitor (and periodic A1C test results) sits on top of the stool, reflecting the balance of the three legs. Your doctor's role in keeping the diabetes-management stool level is to regularly evaluate your overall situation and make medication adjustments to help you achieve your targets. The glyburide you take helps the pancreas make more insulin. Metformin helps the liver release more normal amounts of glucose to regulate fasting blood glucose levels. To a degree, the metformin also helps increase sensitivity to insulin. The stool's other two legs -- what you eat and how you include movement in your day -- are areas you can choose to improve. A certified diabetes educator (CDE) or diabetes education classes can help you make changes that fit your lifestyle. Virginia Zamudio Lange, R.N., M.S.N., CDE, is a registered nurse, certified diabetes educator, and Continue reading >>

Defining A Route | Constructware | Autodesk Knowledge Network

Defining A Route | Constructware | Autodesk Knowledge Network

Learn the basics to get started and then master techniques that help you get the most out of Constructware See complete table of contents In-Product View To translate this article, select a language. The Workflow Route window opens with the General tab displaying as the default. See GUID-D3137E68-5553-4DDD-9019-8088151E7489.htm#WS73099CC142F48755-789C4B1E11D24BE26D7-7BBA for more information about the fields. Select void to remove a route. Only active routes are available to end users. Choose an Uploaded File, if desired, intended to give end-users explanation about the use of the route. Select Allow Previous Routes to Display to indicate if you want to allow the step participants to view prior instances of routes when reviewing the document. Determine which users you want to Allow to Make Changes While in Route. BIC User refers to a current Participant. This gives participants with the appropriate module-level permission the ability to modify the document while it is in the route. Determine if you want the route to Lock Documents at End of route When Route Ends with Approved. Other responses do not have the power to lock a document. Note: The Approved response is only available for "Approval" type steps. Determine whether you want Administrator users to be able to edit locked documents (not typically recommended) Determine if the initiator can select individual cost items to lock (Cost Events, CCDs, RCOs, and OCOs only) Select whether you want to Allow BIC User to Solicit Additional Response(s), and whether, in doing so, they can pass responsibility for a decision (delegate) to others. You can solicit responses from multiple people, but can only delegate to one. If you want to Specify a Document Template on the Route Action tab, do so. Otherwise, the document's select Continue reading >>

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