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A1c Self Test

A1c Self Test Kit From Bayer

A1c Self Test Kit From Bayer

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community If anyone is interested in self-testing their HbA1C level, then Bayer make an easy I have one of these. One thing you should be aware of is that the test packs expire - mine expire 10 months after the purchase date, so I will have to test monthly to get the full use. I paid 110 on ebay to a kit with 10 tests. I had a quick look around the net and the kits seem a bit thin on the ground at the moment. I just wish my Pharmacy would start it's proposed trial of doing the test. Where did you get it from as I have been looking? It's not the cost of the kit that's got me puzzled, it's the cost of the consumables... and I've not been able to locate any refills for it which is worrying... you'd think that supplier would carry them as well... There are no refills. You have to buy an additional set of testers. In the US, drugstores sell two-test kits. You get one meter, and two test kits. The meter can only be used for two tests. Utilizing micro-optical technology that's integrated into a proprietary reusable monitor with single use cartridges, the Monitor will expire after the programmed number of tests have been run (10 or 20). in this day and age, that is just criminal that the meter becomes useless after the pre-programmed number of tests have been performed and no refill kits are available... what a waste of resources making those electronics and the plastic housing. in this day and age, that is just criminal that the meter becomes useless after the pre-programmed number of tests have been performed and no refill kits are available... what a waste of resources making those electronics and the plastic housing. The 'meter' is just a bit of plastic that's a co Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your A1c Before Your Next Appointment

How To Lower Your A1c Before Your Next Appointment

Blood sugar checks, eAG readings, calorie counting — if you’re living with type 2 diabetes, you know that the successful management of the condition can be a numbers game. One of the most important numbers to keep tabs on is your A1C. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar (glucose) level over the previous two to three months, enabling you and your doctor to gauge your blood sugar control over a long period, as compared with your daily self-checks, which provide one-time pictures of your fluctuating blood sugar level. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) compares the A1C test to a baseball player’s batting average — it gives you a more accurate view of your overall success in managing type 2 diabetes. Getting an A1C test — which should be performed at your doctor’s office two to four times a year — is important because the results can help you and your doctor determine if your type 2 diabetes treatment strategy is working. If your test results don't measure up, the two of you can make changes to your plan to help you gain better control over your blood sugar levels and prevent the long-term complications of type 2 diabetes. The A1C test also reduces the risk of error associated with blood sugar self-monitoring. “People sometimes use glucose monitors inaccurately or incorrectly,” says Derek LeRoith, MD, PhD, a professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “We can look at both the A1C results and the chart that a person brings in to see if there’s a discrepancy.” What Do Healthy A1C Results Look Like? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a person who doesn't have type 2 diabetes probably has an Continue reading >>

A1c Calculator*

A1c Calculator*

Average blood glucose and the A1C test Your A1C test result (also known as HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) can be a good general gauge of your diabetes control, because it provides an average blood glucose level over the past few months. Unlike daily blood glucose test results, which are reported as mg/dL, A1C is reported as a percentage. This can make it difficult to understand the relationship between the two. For example, if you check blood glucose 100 times in a month, and your average result is 190 mg/dL this would lead to an A1C of approximately 8.2%, which is above the target of 7% or lower recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for many adults who are not pregnant. For some people, a tighter goal of 6.5% may be appropriate, and for others, a less stringent goal such as 8% may be better.1 Talk to your doctor about the right goal for you. GET YOURS FREE The calculation below is provided to illustrate the relationship between A1C and average blood glucose levels. This calculation is not meant to replace an actual lab A1C result, but to help you better understand the relationship between your test results and your A1C. Use this information to become more familiar with the relationship between average blood glucose levels and A1C—never as a basis for changing your disease management. See how average daily blood sugar may correlate to A1C levels.2 Enter your average blood sugar reading and click Calculate. *Please discuss this additional information with your healthcare provider to gain a better understanding of your overall diabetes management plan. The calculation should not be used to make therapy decisions or changes. What is A1C? Performed by your doctor during your regular visits, your A1C test measures your average blood sugar levels by taking a Continue reading >>

Home A1c Testing Vs. The Lab

Home A1c Testing Vs. The Lab

So it was time again for my A1C and other blood tests last week. Over-time, in fact. You know how I hate going in to the lab when I have to be fasting for lipid tests and can't even have a latte on the way over in the morning. Ugh! And who ever said diabetics don't mind needles?! Anyway, I'd been saving the review unit A1c Now SelfCheck pack I got from Bayer a few weeks ago for just this occasion. What better way to test the accuracy of home a A1C testing kit? I don't mind admitting I had very little faith in the thing. My endo had some of these in her office last year, and we tried them several times. The results were always differed wildly from the A1C I got at the hospital lab. She thought her packs might be too old, although the date on the box seemed OK. So after dragging my behind to the hospital that day, and then enjoying a lovely post-needle cafe breakfast with my husband, I went home and snipped the seal on my A1C Now pack. Inside were all the trimmings for two tests, along with a lot of documentation and a mini-CD that's supposed to explain how to use it — which I didn't watch of course. I figured I'd be representative of the "average patient" who is too lazy to watch the CD. (Not to mention that I have ZERO patience myself and ripped right into the thing without thinking ;) ) Lucky for me, the little fold-out Reference Guide with photos did the trick. It told me what to open first, how to prick my finger for the blood (not more than a usual BG test!), and what to open only "AFTER blood collection!" And I must have done it right, because wouldn't you know, I got 6.3 on the Bayer test, and a 6.4 reported back from the hospital lab. Pretty impressive! (Yes, for those science guys but also for me -- under 6.5, Baby!) So I got to experience the "5-minute home A Continue reading >>

At Home A1c Testing Systems & Kits: Review

At Home A1c Testing Systems & Kits: Review

The A1C, a Glycated hemoglobin, is a form of hemoglobin that is measured primarily to identify the three-month average blood glucose concentration. The A1C test is limited to a three-month average because the lifespan of a red blood cell is only four months. In other words, it’s the indication of your blood sugar level for a three-month period. Typically, your doctor will test your A1C levels every 90 to 180 days depending on how well your blood sugar levels have been managed. In basic terms, the A1C test checks to see how much glucose is attaching to your red blood cells. You can work to keep your A1C within your target range using a recommended diabetes management regimen along with a well-managed diet, exercise routine and other healthy lifestyle . Normal a1C Prediabetes a1C Diabetic a1c Under 5.7 5.7 to 6.4 6.5 and above A1C Test Features and Pricing While most hospital conducted A1C tests cost around $86 per test (depending on your co-pay), you can now buy the A1C self-check home kit for around $40. Each kit includes one test with two strips, but you can buy a double test kit as well. The kits are not reusable so once you use your two lancets, you must buy another kit. Use Most people use this test every 30 days instead of waiting 90 days to be seen by the doctor. This helps patients have a more accurate reading on where their levels fall throughout the month. Insurance Coverage Most insurances will cover 1 or 2 tests per year and some hospitals will have a sample take-home A1C test that you can ask for. However, not all hospitals do so you may still need to buy over the counter kits depending on how many results a year you want to have or how many your doctor requires. Pros and Cons of Home Testing The A1C at home kit needs four large drops of blood which is eas Continue reading >>

The Abcs Of An A1c Test: A Big-picture Look At Diabetes Control

The Abcs Of An A1c Test: A Big-picture Look At Diabetes Control

The ABCs of an A1C Test: A Big-Picture Look at Diabetes Control Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . By Jo-Anne M. Rizzotto, MEd, RD, LDN,CDE, Special to Everyday Health If you are talking with someone about diabetes, you may hear the term "A1C." But what exactly does A1C mean? And why is your A1C important for diabetes management? The A1C, otherwise known as a glycohemoglobin or hemoglobin A1C test , provides a picture of your average blood glucose control for the two to three months before you take the test. The A1C measures the glucose that clings to hemoglobin molecules in your red blood cells. The higher the glucose levels in your blood, the more glucose clings to the hemoglobin, and thus the higher your A1C level will be. Red blood cells are renewed every 120 days. By measuring the percentage of hemoglobin molecules that have glucose attached to them, healthcare providers can see how much extra glucose you have had in your bloodstream over the past few months. The A1C test is done every three to six months, often during a regular diabetes care visit. It does not require fasting, can be done any time of day, and requires only a small sample of blood taken from a finger stick or drawn from your arm. How to Use Your A1C Results to Manage Your Diabetes Why is the A1C test essential for diabetes management? It gives you an overall picture of your diabetes, rather than a reflection of what is happening in one day, and helps you evaluate your diabetes care and make changes. An A1C test can help you manage your diabetes by: verifying self-testing or other blood test results with your healthcare provider determining whether your treatment plan is working demonstrating how healthy food choices and being physica Continue reading >>

Self-test: Check Your Hemoglobin A1c I.q.

Self-test: Check Your Hemoglobin A1c I.q.

*NO TITLE Find out how much you know about the hemoglobin A1c test (also called H-b-A-1-c). Select True or False for each statement on the left. Then see how you did by checking the correct answers and explanations. 1. A hemoglobin A1c test measures the average amount of sugar in your blood over the last 3 months. a) True b) False 2. It's important to know your hemoglobin A1c number. a) True b) False 3. All people with diabetes need to have a hemoglobin A1c test. a) True b) False 4. The hemoglobin A1c goal for people with diabetes is less than 7%. a) True b) False 5. Most people can tell what their blood sugar levels are simply by how they feel. a) True b) False 6. You can have a "touch of sugar" but don't have to do anything about it. a) True b) False 7. You can do something about high blood sugar. a) True b) False 8. A hemoglobin A1c number over 8% is a sign that one or more parts of your treatment plan needs to be changed. a) True b) False 9. A hemoglobin A1c test should be done about once a year. a) True b) False 10. There's no proof that lowering your hemoglobin A1c number can reduce your chances of getting serious eye, kidney, and nerve disease. a) True b) False *NO TITLE Created by the National Diabetes Education Program *JAVASCRIPT var numQuestions=10; ans[1] = "true"; ans[2] = "true"; ans[3] = "true"; ans[4] = "true"; ans[5] = "false"; ans[6] = "false"; ans[7] = "true"; ans[8] = "true"; ans[9] = "false"; ans[10] = "false"; explainAnswer[1]="The hemoglobin A1c test shows the average amount of sugar in your blood over the last 3 months. It is a simple lab test done by your health care provider. The hemoglobin A1c is the best test to find out if your blood sugar is under control."; explainAnswer[2]=" If you know your hemoglobin A1c number, you will know if your bl Continue reading >>

A1c Now Self Check 2 Test Kit 3030

A1c Now Self Check 2 Test Kit 3030

The lowest-priced brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item in its original packaging (where packaging is applicable).Packaging should be the same as what is found in a retail store, unless the item is handmade or was packaged by the manufacturer in non-retail packaging, such as an unprinted box or plastic bag.See details for additional description. Get it by Friday, May 18 from San Diego, California No returns, but backed by eBay Money back guarantee The price has gone up since I last bought one (it has been a while) and it looks like a different company is selling it now, but it is still easy to use and accurate. It is exactly like the ones I used to buy at a big box store and those were accurate with the lab. Use it with confidence. You get the A1C result from the meter in 5 minutes and the whole procedure from start (pricking your finger) and getting the result is about 7 minutes in all unless you are using it for the first time and even then I would think it only would take 10 minutes from start to finish. The instructions are clear and and illustrated well. Yesterday I performed a comparison between a laboratory A1c measurement (venipuncture from my arm) and compared it to two A1c Now kits from different lot numbers. The kits were only 0.1% different on two separate comparisons. Thus they are reproducible. But they were 0.4% off from the actual laboratory test. When I did this about 18 months ago when Bayer produced the kits everything was within 0.1%. The kits are now reading consistently 0.4% LOWER than the actual blood tests. Should you simply add 0.4% to the kits reading? Maybe, but I would only depend on these kits putting you in the ball park not giving you a precise reading which your doctor can provide you with a more sophisticated laboratory A1c test w Continue reading >>

My Site - Chapter 9: Monitoring Glycemic Control

My Site - Chapter 9: Monitoring Glycemic Control

Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) is a valuable indicator of glycemic treatment effectiveness and should be measured at least every 3 months when glycemic targets are not being met and when antihyperglycemic therapy is being adjusted. In some circumstances, such as when significant changes are made to therapy or during pregnancy, it is appropriate to check A1C more frequently. Awareness of all measures of glycemiaself-monitored blood glucose results, including self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG), flash glucose monitoring (FGM), continous glucose monitoring (CGM) and A1Cprovides the best information to assess glycemic control. Self-monitoring of blood glucose, FGM and CGM should not be viewed as glucose-lowering interventions, but rather as aids to assess the effectiveness of glucose-lowering interventions and to prevent and detect hypoglycemia. Timing and frequency of SMBG may be determined individually based on the type of diabetes, the type of antihyperglycemic treatment prescribed, the need for information about blood glucose levels and the individual's capacity to use the information from testing to modify healthy behaviours or self-adjust antihyperglycemic agents. SMBG, FGM and CGM linked with a structured educational and therapeutic program designed to facilitate behaviour change can improve blood glucose levels and prevent hypoglycemia. A1C is a measurement of your average blood glucose control for the last 2 to 3 months. Approximately 50% of the value comes from the last 30 days. You should have your A1C measured every 3 months when your blood glucose targets are not being met or when you are making changes to your diabetes management. In some circumstances, such as when significant changes are made to your glucose-lowering therapy or during pregnancy, your health-care Continue reading >>

Testing Your Blood Glucose

Testing Your Blood Glucose

Testing your blood glucose, also known as Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG), is a method of checking how much glucose (sugar) is in the blood using a glucose meter -- anywhere, anytime. Here, you'll learn some basics about: Blood sugar targets for adults How your doctor tests your blood The importance of self-testing When to test and what to look for How to share results with your doctor Blood glucose targets for non-pregnant adults* Before meal After meal 80-120 mg/dL Less than 180 mg/dL How your doctor tests your blood -- the A1C test† Your doctor uses what is called an A1C (Glycosylated Hemoglobin) test to see what your average blood glucose level has been over the last two to three months. Used for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, it gives you and your doctor an indication on how well you are responding to your treatment regimen, and if any adjustments are necessary. The goal is to keep your level below seven percent (7%).* The A1C test is sometimes referred to as the hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c or glycohemoglobin test. The connection between A1C and average blood sugar levels.† Your A1C test result will not show the daily effects of food choices and your activity. A blood glucose meter is the best way to observe and track the immediate effects of food choices and activity on your blood glucose levels. This allows you to take immediate action to bring your glucose levels within range if needed. Your doctor will also rely upon your blood glucose meter results to assess and adjust your treatment regimen. When to test and what to look for – a practical guide Use this simple chart to remind you when to test and what to observe to help you manage your blood glucose level on a daily basis. When to test What to look for First thing in the morning, before you eat How Continue reading >>

What Are The Limitations Of The A1c Test For Diabetes Management? | Diabetes - Sharecare

What Are The Limitations Of The A1c Test For Diabetes Management? | Diabetes - Sharecare

What are the limitations of the A1C test for diabetes management? Marjorie Nolan Cohn on behalf of Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics It's important to note that the effectiveness of A1C tests may be limited in certain cases. For example: If you experience heavy or chronic bleeding, your hemoglobin stores may be depleted. This may make your A1C test results falsely low. If you don't have enough iron in your bloodstream, your A1C test results may be falsely high. Most people have only one type of hemoglobin, called hemoglobin A. If you have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant), your A1C test result may be falsely high or falsely low. Hemoglobin variants are most often found in blacks and people of Mediterranean or Southeast Asian heritage. Hemoglobin variants can be confirmed with lab tests. If you're diagnosed with a hemoglobin variant, your A1C tests may need to be done at a specialized lab for the most accurate results. Also keep in mind that the normal range for A1C results may vary somewhat among labs. If you consult a new doctor or use a different lab, it's important to consider this possible variation when interpreting your A1C test results. Although the A1C test is an important tool, it can't replace daily self-testing of blood glucose for those who need it. A1C tests don't measure your day-to-day control. You can't adjust your insulin on the basis of your A1C tests. That's why your blood sugar checks and your log of results are so important to staying in effective control. Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the bodys inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes ... is a serious, life-long condition Continue reading >>

A1cnow®+ System

A1cnow®+ System

Lab Quality Results at the Point-of-Care The A1CNow+ system provides healthcare professionals with a fast and easy way of obtaining accurate A1C results with just a fingerstick. This innovative technology enables clinicians to communicate face-to-face with patients about their diabetes control in minutes, not days. In addition, the A1CNow+ system is fully reimbursable. More Efficient than the Lab Portable - use in multiple exam rooms Easy to use - minimal training required Certifications​ FDA-cleared CE References: 1. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Professional Procedure Guide PN 91078 Rev. B. March 2014. 2. Relative to TOSOH certified reference method. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Preliminary Performance Data, May 30, 2014. Data on file. 3. Exhibits a linear dynamic range and precision that meets current NGSP standards. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Preliminary Performance Data, May 30, 2014. Data on file. 4. Excellent Precision of 2.15% CV and 4.3% CV at the Normal (5.7% HbA1c) and High (8.9% HbA1c) ends of the spectrum. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Preliminary Performance Data, May 30, 2014. Data on file. Complimentary Whitepaper Download Point-of-Care Alternatives to A1C Testing ​Ease-of-use point-of-care medical devices provide an advantage in measuring HbA1c in situations where clinical laboratory analyzers are unavailable to provide physicians with real-time information to better manage diabetes. The purpose of this whitepaper is to help healthcare professionals understand the viability of portable, point-of-care A1C monitors. What you will learn from this whitepaper: How point-of-care devices are viable alternatives to sending blood to laboratory testing Point-of-care A1C device accuracy evaluations relative to three clinical laboratory HbA1c analyzers Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of An Over-the-counter Glycated Hemoglobin (a1c) Test Kit

Evaluation Of An Over-the-counter Glycated Hemoglobin (a1c) Test Kit

Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) monitoring is an integral component of diabetes management. This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the A1CNow® SELFCHECK device when used by lay users and health care professionals (HCPs) to measure A1C. Subjects performed two A1CNow SELFCHECK finger-stick self-tests followed by a finger-stick test of the subject’s blood by a HCP. The primary endpoint assessed accuracy of the subject and HCP A1CNow SELFCHECK readings. Secondary endpoints included precision, comprehension of instructional material (written material ± DVD), and product satisfaction. For accuracy comparison, a venous blood sample was drawn from each subject and tested by laboratory (TOSOH) analysis. Subject comprehension of product instructional material was evaluated via first-time failure (FTF) rate as recorded by the HCP, and subject satisfaction was assessed through written survey. A total of 110 subjects with (n = 93) and without (n = 17) diabetes participated. Of 177 subject A1C values, 165 (93.2%) were within the acceptable range of ±13.5% of the laboratory reference value and considered accurate. Regression analysis showed good correlation of subject values to laboratory and HCP results (R2 = 0.93 for both). The average within-subject coefficient of variation was 4.57% (n = 74). The FTF rates with and without instructional DVD were 11.3% (n = 56) and 39.6% (n = 54), respectively. Subjects with diabetes/prediabetes overwhelmingly indicated that they were “very” to “extremely” likely (93.5%) to discuss their home A1C results with their HCP. Lay users found the A1CNow SELFCHECK easy to use, and both lay users and HCPs were able to measure A1C accurately. Keywords: A1CNow, diabetes, glycated hemoglobin A1c, in vitro diagnostic for home use, over-t Continue reading >>

Potential A1c Test Alternative; Glucose Meter Recall

Potential A1c Test Alternative; Glucose Meter Recall

Potential A1C Test Alternative According to a new study published in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, measurements of substances known as fructosamine and glycated albumin might be useful for predicting a person’s risk of developing diabetes complications. The A1C test measures blood glucose control over the previous 2–3 months, but the results of the test are not valid in people with conditions such as anemia, kidney disease, hemoglobinopathies, and HIV. To determine whether fructosamine and glycated albumin, markers of glucose control over 2–4 weeks, might be useful for predicting diabetes complications in these populations, researchers took blood samples from over 12,000 people in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. “We compared the associations of [A1C], fructosamine, and glycated albumin with two of the most important clinical outcomes related to diabetes: retinopathy (eye disease) and kidney disease. We found that fructosamine and glycated albumin were strongly associated with retinopathy and kidney disease. [T]hese associations were similar to those observed for [A1C] with these outcomes,” noted lead study author Elizabeth Selvin, PhD, MPH. According to the researchers, these results suggest that fructosamine and glycated albumin may be useful alternatives for monitoring long-term blood glucose control in people for whom the A1C test is invalid. “Further studies are need to understand the value of these tests in the clinic,” said Selvin. For more information, read the press release from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health or see the study’s abstract in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. And to learn more about the A1C test, click here. Glucose Meter Recall Nipro Diagnostics has launched a Continue reading >>

A1c Home Test Kits For Diabetes

A1c Home Test Kits For Diabetes

Hemoglobin A1C tests are used to screen for and diagnose prediabetes and diabetes. A1C home test kits are a good option if you want to testyour A1C at home in between visits to your doctor, whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. An A1C test gives a picture of how well your diabetes treatment is working by showing your average blood sugar level for the past two or three months. This can be very helpful in your diabetes management plan. All A1C home test kits allow you to provide a small blood sample, about the same as your glucose meter ,in the convenience of your home. Depending on the type of kit you purchase, you either get immediate results at home or you send the sample to a lab for analysis. Home A1C tests are not approved for diagnosing diabetes. You need to see a doctor for a diagnosis. There are factors that will affect the accuracy of A1C tests, so discuss this with your doctor to ensure you know whether they're appropriate for you. A1C results are affected by hemoglobin variants (such as sickle cell), anemia, transfusion, blood loss, pregnancy, and rheumatoid factor. Portable consumer options for immediate results at home are now available at major retailers, with both name brand and house brand versions. A1CNow SELF CHECK was the original FDA-approved brand from Bayer Healthcare. PTS Diagnostics purchased the A1CNow business in 2014 and markets it under the original name, plus they license it for store brand devices. Walmart sells it as ReliOn Fast A1C Test and Walgreens and CVS as At Home A1C Test Kit. This technology received FDA approval and allows you to learn your A1C number in five minutes. It's similar in appearance to your daily glucose meter, but you don't use it on a continual basis. You purchase this A1C meter in a two-test kit. Once you have Continue reading >>

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