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A1c Of 7.2

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

The hemoglobin A1c test tells you your average level of blood sugar over the past 2 to 3 months. It's also called HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, and glycohemoglobin. People who have diabetes need this test regularly to see if their levels are staying within range. It can tell if you need to adjust your diabetes medicines. The A1c test is also used to diagnose diabetes. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells. It gives blood its red color, and it’s job is to carry oxygen throughout your body. The sugar in your blood is called glucose. When glucose builds up in your blood, it binds to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. The A1c test measures how much glucose is bound. Red blood cells live for about 3 months, so the test shows the average level of glucose in your blood for the past 3 months. If your glucose levels have been high over recent weeks, your hemoglobin A1c test will be higher. For people without diabetes, the normal range for the hemoglobin A1c level is between 4% and 5.6%. Hemoglobin A1c levels between 5.7% and 6.4% mean you have a higher change of getting of diabetes. Levels of 6.5% or higher mean you have diabetes. The target A1c level for people with diabetes is usually less than 7%. The higher the hemoglobin A1c, the higher your risk of having complications related to diabetes. A combination of diet, exercise, and medication can bring your levels down. People with diabetes should have an A1c test every 3 months to make sure their blood sugar is in their target range. If your diabetes is under good control, you may be able to wait longer between the blood tests. But experts recommend checking at least two times a year. People with diseases affecting hemoglobin, such as anemia, may get misleading results with this test. Other things that can Continue reading >>

David’s Guide To Getting Our A1c Under 6.0

David’s Guide To Getting Our A1c Under 6.0

The A1C test is our best scorecard to show how well we are controlling our diabetes. It measures how much glucose has been sticking to our red blood cells for the previous two or three months. Since our bodies replace each red blood cell with a new one every four months, this test tells us the average of how high our glucose levels have been during the life of the cells. The experts recommend that we should get our A1C level tested at least twice a year. People who take insulin need to get it about four times a year. If the test shows that our blood glucose level is high, it means that we have a greater risk of having diabetes problems. Think of the A1C as an early warning system for the insidious complications that we can get down the road when we don’t control our condition. But what do we mean by a “high” A1C level? Here the experts disagree. The American Diabetes Association says that we need to keep our A1C results below 7.0 percent. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists sets the target at 6.5 percent. The International Diabetes Federation, or IDF, also recommends that most people with diabetes keep their levels below 6.5 percent. The more our A1C level is higher than normal, the greater the likelihood that we will suffer from one or more of the complications of diabetes. And here too the experts disagree with how they define “normal.” People who don’t have diabetes have A1C levels below 6.0 percent. That’s the gist of what I wrote here recently in “The Normal A1C Level.” The IDF agrees. But more aggressive endocrinologists say that a truly normal A1C ranges from 4.2 percent to 4.6 percent. That’s what Dr. Richard K. Bernstein wrote in Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. No matter what our level is, we can be sure that lower is Continue reading >>

My A1c Is At 7.2, At Present. What Can I Do In The Short Term To Lower This To 6.5 Or Lower.

My A1c Is At 7.2, At Present. What Can I Do In The Short Term To Lower This To 6.5 Or Lower.

Question Originally asked by Community Member flybye My A1c Is At 7.2, At Present. What Can I Do In The Short Term To Lower This To 6.5 Or Lower. Hello, my A1C is at 7.2 at present. What can I do in the short-term to lower this to 6.5 or lower? Answer Hi there, flybye - A doctor is always going to be your best source of advice on dealing with your diabetes, so you should check with him/her about the safest ways to lower your A1C levels. However, I can tell you that there are some dietary changes you can make that can really help you with this. Cutting your consumption of fatty foods, carbs, and high-calorie foods will lower A1C levels, for example. You should also try to avoid eating such foods and white flour, potatoes, rice, and noodles, as well as sugary foods such as ice cream. Fried foods and lunch meats also boosts A1C levels. Here are some other links that you might find helpful: Teaching Type 2 Diabetes Patients Decreases Hemoglobin A1C Levels American Diabetes Association Convention Day 2: A1C Levels Best of luck to you! You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

What’s Normal Blood Sugar?

What’s Normal Blood Sugar?

Thank you for dropping in! If you need help lowering your blood sugar level, check out my books at Amazon or Smashwords. If you’re outside of the U.S., Smashwords may be the best source. —Steve Parker, M.D * * * Physicians focus so much on disease that we sometimes lose sight of what’s healthy and normal. For instance, the American Diabetes Association defines “tight” control of diabetes to include sugar levels as high as 179 mg/dl (9.9 mmol/l) when measured two hours after a meal. In contrast, young adults without diabetes two hours after a meal are usually in the range of 90 to 110 mg/dl (5.0–6.1 mmol/l). What Is a Normal Blood Sugar Level? The following numbers refer to average blood sugar (glucose) levels in venous plasma, as measured in a lab. Portable home glucose meters measure sugar in capillary whole blood. Many, but not all, meters in 2011 are calibrated to compare directly to venous plasma levels. Fasting blood sugar after a night of sleep and before breakfast: 85 mg/dl (4.7 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 110 mg/dl (6.1 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 95 mg/dl (5.3 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 85 mg/dl (4.7 mmol/l) (The aforementioned meal derives 50–55% of its energy from carbohydrate) ♦ ♦ ♦ Ranges of blood sugar for young healthy non-diabetic adults: Fasting blood sugar: 70–90 mg/dl (3.9–5.0 mmol/l) One hour after a typical meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.9 mmol/l) Two hours after a typical meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.1 mmol/l) Five hours after a typical meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.9–5.00 mmol/l) Blood sugars tend to be a bit lower in pregnant women. ♦ ♦ ♦ What Level of Blood Sugar Defines Diabetes and Prediabetes? According to the 2007 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists: Prediabetes: Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Score On The A1c Diabetes Test?

What Is A Good Score On The A1c Diabetes Test?

Normal A1C level can range from 4.5 to 6 percent. Someone who's had uncontrolled diabetes for a long time can have an A1C level above 9 percent. A1C test is used to diagnose diabetes, an A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate dates indicates diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which is high risk of developing diabetes. For most people who have previously diagnosed diabetes, an A1C level of 7 percent or less is a common treatment target. Higher targets may be chosen in some individuals. If your A1C level is above your target, your doctor may recommend a change in your diabetes treatment plan. Remember, the higher your A1C level, the higher your risk of diabetes complications. A good score on the A1C test depends on whether you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes. For those who do not have diabetes, a score of less than 5.7% is considered normal, while 5.7% to 6.4% indicates prediabetes and 6.5% or higher means you have diabetes. If you already have diabetes, a score of 7% or lower is desired. You and your doctor can decide what score is best for you. The A1C diabetes test is a way to get an average of how well your blood sugar has been controlled for the past three months. The standard A1C goal for most people with diabetes is less than 7%. However, the goal may be individualized or may be different for some people, especially older adults, people with heart disease or those who are prone to frequent low blood glucose. It's a good idea to find out what your A1C goal should be from your healthcare provider and then use that as a benchmark for your A1C results. No one quite agrees on where your A1C score should be, but we all agree on where it shouldn’t be. The scale does not look anything like the BGL numbers you are used Continue reading >>

Ch 11-fnp Stewart 2017

Ch 11-fnp Stewart 2017

Answer/Rationale: 9. A, B, C, D, E, and F are all correct. All answers are correct except G "gender." Rationale: The sex of the patient is not a determinant of therapeutic recommendations. 10. The most common comorbidities that occur with type 2 diabetes mellitus are: A. Depression, cancer, obstructive sleep apnea. B. Obesity, coronary artery disease, sedentary lifestyle. C. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity. D. Hypothyroidism, hyperlipidemia, chronic kidney disease. Answer/Rationale: 10. C. The most common comorbid conditions associated with type 2 diabetes are hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and obesity. There is a strong correlation between metabolic syndrome and the development of type 2 diabetes. 11. DSME (diabetes self-management education) encourages the patient to make informed decisions. This approach is most successful when: A. The diabetic is provided with enough education and information that he or she can make an informed decision. B. It is patient-centered and responsive to individual preferences, needs, and values. C. The patient is given written directions that outlines a specific medication regimen and goal. D. A consensus model is used which considers multiple disciplines involved in the care of the diabetic individual. Answer/Rationale: 11. B. DSME must be patient-centered and responsive to the individual's needs, otherwise it is unlikely to be successful. 12. Medical nutritional therapy (MNT) is an integral part of diabetes self-management education. Which of the following aspects of MNT would be most supportive to the patient? A. All patients with type 2 diabetes should be encouraged to lose between 2 and 8 kilograms of their body weight. B. All members of the health care team involved with the diabetic individual should be knowledgeable about MN Continue reading >>

What Does A 7.2 A1c Mean?

What Does A 7.2 A1c Mean?

Experience: B.A.M.S{Ayurveda Physician}Worked in various clinical departments like Medicine,ER,Gynae The A1c test is used primarily to monitor the glucose control of diabetics over time. In poorly controlled diabetes, its 8.0% or above, and in well controlled patients it's less than 7.0%. It has been proven that an HbA1c level of 7.2 or less greatly reduces the risk of complications from diabetes. However, any reduction in haemoglobin A1c is a benefit. Reply to Dr AMIT MUNJAL's Post: I haven't been diagnosed with diabetes yet. Will this one test diagnose me? Health Professional: Dr Amit Munjal , Physicianreplied 11 years ago A1C at 7.2 % is not a diagnostic test but more useful for screening.It suggest mean sugar level around 150 mg/dl in past three months.You should further be tested for Fasting Blood sugar ,Post parandial blood sugar and GTT(glucose tolerance test) for more accurate diagnosis. A1C at 4% - 6% is diagnostic non diabetic range. Reply to Dr AMIT MUNJAL's Post: I do not accept these responses. They are nothing that I haven't already googled myself. Experience: B.A.M.S{Ayurveda Physician}Worked in various clinical departments like Medicine,ER,Gynae A new question is answered every 9 seconds Ask an ExpertExperts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm. Get a Professional AnswerVia email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site. Ask follow up questions if you need to. 100% Satisfaction GuaranteeRate the answer you receive. Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com. JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal Continue reading >>

Patient Comments: Hemoglobin A1c Test - High Results

Patient Comments: Hemoglobin A1c Test - High Results

I have been doing a lot of research on CIN1. I was 26 when my doctor told me I have cervical dysplasia (CIN1), January of 20017. I didn't think anything of it. But then she told me I have HPV high risk E6/E7 mRNA. One day I was looking through my medical records online and discovered I had CIN1 3 years ago July of 2014 and my doctor never told me. Now I am stressing over it because my periods are irregular and when I do have them they are strange. Also the year of 2014 I told my doctor I was having clots the size of 2 half dollars put together and she didn't say anything either. I get pelvic pain sometimes. She did a biopsy and I was positive for CIN1 and high risk HPV and ascus. I don't know what I should do, maybe I should get a new doctor. In May 2015 I was really tired, lethargic and bloated all the time. I was so constipated and miserable. I had been gluten free for 4 years by self-diagnosis. Finally, I went to a gastroenterologist. My blood work came back positive for Helicobacter pylori. The doctor said that H. pylori causes similar symptoms as gluten allergies. I had an endoscopy and colonoscopy which showed all of the internal inflammation and prior damage from the bacteria. It seemed to be dormant so there was no need for eradication, however the prescription acid reflux pills made me sick so I stopped that. Now I take probiotics and manuka honey and feel great. Try to avoid the prescription drugs. I have to go back for a check up to see if the bacteria is gone. I just had a laparoscopy 2 days ago and other than feeling full and bloated from the gas and a soreness around the incisions, I feel pretty good. The day of the surgery when I came home, I was very sleepy and slept for almost 2 days with getting up, except here and there to use the bathroom and eat. My Continue reading >>

Hba1c Of 7.2 - Medication Necessary?

Hba1c Of 7.2 - Medication Necessary?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My Hba1c level in January this year was 7.2 and my GP prescribed metformin. I tried the regular for 1 month, had to come off due to digestive problems, then tried slow release but after 2 months it too seemed to neutralise my digestion and I felt pretty awful; in fact my blood sugar readings worsened, and I came off, with an initial IMPROVEMENT in levels. In my July test, after 3 months of no medication, reading was again 7.2 but my doctor still wants me to medicate, and suggests sitagliptin. I am reluctant to try something that is also reported to give digestive problems. I have had mild digestive problems most of my life, now 54. However am fully aware of the dangers of diabetes. Is 7.2 a level at which I need to medicate, or can it be postponed? I did feel that the digestive problems seemed to make me sufficiently ill that the cure was as bad or worse than the diabetes, but I am of course just not sure. My GP is even suggesting insulin, but surely 7.2 is too low a level to justify that? I was first diagnosed pre-diabetic 8 years ago and lost a lot of weight giving 2 years of perfect non-diabetic results, and a "you are not diabetic" from my GP, but although have kept most of weight off it seems to have eventually caught up with me. I was diagnosed earlier this year with an HbA1c of 7.8% in March. That was down to 7% at the end of May after eliminating all added sugar, sweet treats, most crisps and junk food and by adding a lot more fresh and raw. I was trying to follow a low glyceamic index diet at that point. After the last Hba1c I went low carb, eliminating bread, pasta, rice, potatoes and anything obviously starchy and testing my blood several t Continue reading >>

Why Should My A1c Be 7 Per Cent Or Less?

Why Should My A1c Be 7 Per Cent Or Less?

Share: Over the last several years a significant amount of research has proven that control matters, and good control is now defined as an A1C of < 7 per cent. What is an A1C? An A1C test shows your blood glucose control over the last 2 or 3 months. Research from both the Diabetes Control & Complications Trial (DCCT) and its follow up study (EDIC) proves that having an A1C of 7 per cent is definitely worthwhile for persons with type 1 diabetes. Exactly 1441 volunteers aged 13 to 39, all with type 1 diabetes, took part. These people agreed to randomly be assigned to either conventional treatment - taking about two insulin injections a day - or to intensive treatment (IT) - taking either multiple dose insulin (MDI, about 4 injections a day) or an insulin pump. During the study the A1C of each group was compared: the conventional therapy group had an average A1C of 9.1 per cent (normal 4-6 per cent) the intensive therapy group had an average A1C of 7.2 per cent The purpose was to finally demonstrate whether or not good blood sugar control was really important to prevent the complications of diabetes. And indeed it is – as you can see below, complications developed at a much lower rate in the intensively treated group compared to the conventional group. Effect of intensive therapy on: Those with no complications at beginning of study: Those with some complication at beginning of study: Eye Disease (retinopathy) 76% overall reduction 54% less progression 45% less risk of needing laser therapy Kidney Disease (nephropathy) 34% less microalbuminuria 56% less proteinuria Nerve Disease (neuropathy) 69% less occurrence 57% less occurrence Heart Disease Trend towards reduction in risk factors Trend towards reduction in risk factors The reduction in risk for eye disease (the prima Continue reading >>

A1c At 7.2 And Doc Is Pleased

A1c At 7.2 And Doc Is Pleased

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Since starting on the MM pump 15 months ago, my A1c has been reduced from just under 11 to 7.2 on my last lab test (March). I told my Endocrinologist that I would prefer to get my A1c below 6 because this is the range I see many members reporting on this forum. He told me that I should not compare my numbers with the typical type 2 who is not insulin dependent. Based on my history, he stated that I should be very pleased with my progress and does not expect me to show results significantly below 7. Does this make sense to any other insulin dependent type 2's ?. Congratulations on the drop in a1c. That shows a lot of hard work. I can't comment as a T2, but I can say that getting into the 5s with insulin can be difficult as you run the risks of a lot of lows. I hit the low 6s with minimal lows and not too many spikes and was happy with that. I think your doc has the right approach in that he was encouraging with the progress and doesn't want you to overdo the insulin. Also, don't compare yourself with others. Everyone is different and you will achieve what works for you. Don, I'm not a T2 but my endo has told me that he does not want my a1C below 7 nor does he think I can achieve it without many severe lows. I'm working now to prove him wrong. Don, I'm not a T2 but my endo has told me that he does not want my a1C below 7 nor does he think I can achieve it without many severe lows. I'm working now to prove him wrong. I've always found that an a1c of 7 means a number of highs that can be controlled without risking lows. I ran at about 7 for a while and was not happy. My endo encouraged me and I g Continue reading >>

Unplanned Pregnancy With A Starting A1c Of 7.2

Unplanned Pregnancy With A Starting A1c Of 7.2

Unplanned pregnancy with a starting A1C of 7.2 I just found out Im Pregnant (approximately 5 weeks) and my last a1c was 7.2. I am on a Medtronic pump and CGM and am working to get my a1c down, but in my 27 years of being T1 its never been below 7. I havent been able to get in to see my endo or a high risk specialty OB yet (due to awful government health insurance). A lot of the discussions Ive been ready are all with lower levels and healthy pregnancy. Im not lazy by any means and work really hard to keep my numbers in check, but I also work 2 very fast paced hectic jobs so its hard For me to keep my bg so low to maintain under a 6 That I wont drop into hypos while working. Is it possible to have a healthy pregnancy and baby with an a1c around 7? Hi @Amber.marie welcome to TuDiabetes! Weve had a lot of women post here about pregnancy with a1cs not exactly where theyd like it to be and things turned out fine. I did a search of "unplanned pregnancy and heres what came up I am 8 weeks pregnant now, but my a1c is 7.3. I live in Japan, so maybe my doctors have different expectations, but my Endo said this was fine. Of course I dont want it to go higher either. My last pregnancy my a1c wasnt ideal either, and of course all the changing insulin needs added challenges. My baby was 10lb 4 oz, vaginal delivery, NO epidural. I wouldnt want to do that again, but now I have a perfectly healthy and happy toddler. Try not to worry too much, that wont help either. Do what you can, and enjoy your pregnancy! Congratulations! Continue reading >>

What Do Your A1c Test Results Really Mean?

What Do Your A1c Test Results Really Mean?

The hemoglobin A1c test, as we all know, is supposed to give a sense of your average blood glucose levels over the past three months. But here’s a question for you: have you ever tried to figure out what those average blood glucose levels actually are? Say you have an A1c of 6.5% — what, in mg/dl, does that translate to? Try searching Google — it’s hard to find an answer. To quote from a post I wrote a few years ago (see entry from 4:45), that’s partially because: “Not only is there no one standardized definition as to the correlation between A1c and mean glucose levels (JDRF says 1% = 24.4 mg/dl, ADA says 28.7), but different people have different correlations. For example, if you are a ‘high glycolator’ (more glucose sticks to your hemoglobin than the average) you can have a relatively high A1c but a low mean glucose. The speaker gave the example of a patient who had a 8.2% A1c, but a mean glucose of 159 mg/dl (he was speaking using the generally accepted idea that 7% roughly equals a mean of 154 mg/dl). Treat him more aggressively, and you’ll end up with hypos. And if you’re a ‘hypoglycolator,’ it’s the opposite.” Well, just this week, a new paper was published in the American Diabetes Association’s Diabetes Care journal that provides a more solid answer to this question than I’ve seen — even though, as I must warn you, personal variability (as described above) means there’s still no precise answer. In the study, researchers wanted to find out what your average blood sugar would have to be in three situations — fasting, after meals and before bed — in order to achieve a particular A1c. Here are their results: A1c test results of 5.5-6.49% were associated with an average fasting blood glucose level of 122 mg/dl. A1c test results Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

Ending The A1c Blame Game

Ending The A1c Blame Game

When a diabetes researcher wears a glucose sensor, she is reminded that diabetes is mainly physiological. When glucose sensors first became available in clinical trials some 2 decades ago, I decided to wear a sensor to compare my glucose levels as a non-diabetic individual with glucose levels of my patients. I was excited to have this new tool, which measured 288 glucose readings a day and could be used 3 days at a time, as a resource for patients, particularly for those with blood glucose levels that had been difficult to control. During my training as an endocrinologist, we didn’t have glucose meters. In the hospital, we used glucose strips that required drawing a significant amount of blood, then waiting and wiping the blood off. You determined glucose range based on how dark the strip became. While wearing my sensor, I did my best to exercise and eat correctly, but I also indulged in chocolate donuts. Still, when I compared my daily readings with that of a patient with a fabulous A1C of 6.3%, I was shocked. Even with the donuts, my highest glucose over the three days was 103 mg/dL, whereas my patient’s A1C levels could bounce from 50 to 500 mg/dL in moments. There was no comparison. Here I was patting myself on the back for thinking that I was taking such great care of my patients, when in reality, I learned that comparing A1Cs for people with and without diabetes was like comparing apples and oranges. Even patients who used insulin pumps, ate the same meals every day, exercised daily and “did everything right” can hardly hope to achieve the glucose levels of a person without diabetes. I realized I needed to stop blaming my patients or thinking myself superior. Research has played a vital role in helping others come to the same conclusion. It can be easy to Continue reading >>

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