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A1c Level 7.2

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often appear suddenly and are often the reason for checking blood sugar levels. Because symptoms of other types of diabetes and prediabetes come on more gradually or may not be evident, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended screening guidelines. The ADA recommends that the following people be screened for diabetes: Anyone with a body mass index higher than 25, regardless of age, who has additional risk factors, such as high blood pressure, a sedentary lifestyle, a history of polycystic ovary syndrome, having delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds, a history of diabetes in pregnancy, high cholesterol levels, a history of heart disease, and having a close relative with diabetes. Anyone older than age 45 is advised to receive an initial blood sugar screening, and then, if the results are normal, to be screened every three years thereafter. Tests for type 1 and type 2 diabetes and prediabetes Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates prediabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. If the A1C test results aren't consistent, the test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

How To Calculate Your A1c

How To Calculate Your A1c

The Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c or simply A1c for short) test is a blood test used to measure the average blood glucose concentration in your body in the past 1-3 months. For diabetics, this is the standard way of determining how well the diabetes is controlled. An A1c of less than 7% is considered good. Getting the test every 3 months (usually during a doctor visit) is usually enough. But sometimes you may want to just estimate your A1c level based on the data from your regular self-tests. The formula below could help in this case. Accuracy, of course, could vary depending on how often and when you check your blood sugar. I found it pretty accurate last time I used it. My calculation was off only by 0.1%. This is the same formula GlucoseTracker uses in the app's dashboard. Glucose in mg/dL: A1c = (46.7 + average_blood_glucose) / 28.7 Glucose in mmol/L: A1c = (2.59 + average_blood_glucose) / 1.59 So, for example, if your average blood glucose level in the past 3 months is 130 mg/dL (7.2 mmol/L) , your estimated A1c is 6.15%. There are also cheaper devices you can buy that will allow you to do the actual A1c tests yourself, like this one. If you need to do these tests more often, say every month, then it could save you money in the long run as lab tests could get expensive. It may not be as accurate as the lab tests, but my guess is it's probably good enough. Continue reading >>

Overtreatment Of Elderly Diabetics

Overtreatment Of Elderly Diabetics

The last time I was directly responsible for treating diabetes was fifty years ago, when I was an intern in medicine at UCLA. In my subsequent career as a psychiatrist I was not directly responsible for diabetes care, and as an individual, I don’t have the condition. As a result, I haven’t kept up on diabetes treatment, so a June 11 article on “Diabetes Overtreatment in Elderly Individuals: Risky Business in Need of Better Management” was news to me. The opening two sentences of the American Diabetes Association’s article on “Tight Diabetes Control” make it sound as if “tight control” should be the goal of treatment: “Keeping your blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible can be a lifesaver. Tight control can prevent or slow the progress of many complications of diabetes, giving you extra years of healthy, active life.” In my uninformed state, that’s how I understood how diabetes should be managed, even for over 65ers. But I was wrong. Several paragraphs later there’s a very clear statement that elderly people with diabetes should be treated differently: “Elderly people probably should not go on tight control. Hypoglycemia [overly low blood sugar] can cause strokes and heart attacks in older people. Also, the major goal of tight control is to prevent complications many years later. Tight control is most worthwhile for healthy people who can expect to live at least 10 more years.” The American Geriatrics Society gives precise guidelines for the goal of diabetes treatment in over 65ers. The key measure of diabetes control is hemoglobin A1c. For healthy over 65ers with long life expectancy, the target should be 7.0 – 7.5%. For those with “moderate comorbidity” (so-so health) and a life expectancy of less than 10 years the targe Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Score On The A1c Diabetes Test?

What Is A Good Score On The A1c Diabetes Test?

Normal A1C level can range from 4.5 to 6 percent. Someone who's had uncontrolled diabetes for a long time can have an A1C level above 9 percent. A1C test is used to diagnose diabetes, an A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate dates indicates diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which is high risk of developing diabetes. For most people who have previously diagnosed diabetes, an A1C level of 7 percent or less is a common treatment target. Higher targets may be chosen in some individuals. If your A1C level is above your target, your doctor may recommend a change in your diabetes treatment plan. Remember, the higher your A1C level, the higher your risk of diabetes complications. A good score on the A1C test depends on whether you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes. For those who do not have diabetes, a score of less than 5.7% is considered normal, while 5.7% to 6.4% indicates prediabetes and 6.5% or higher means you have diabetes. If you already have diabetes, a score of 7% or lower is desired. You and your doctor can decide what score is best for you. The A1C diabetes test is a way to get an average of how well your blood sugar has been controlled for the past three months. The standard A1C goal for most people with diabetes is less than 7%. However, the goal may be individualized or may be different for some people, especially older adults, people with heart disease or those who are prone to frequent low blood glucose. It's a good idea to find out what your A1C goal should be from your healthcare provider and then use that as a benchmark for your A1C results. No one quite agrees on where your A1C score should be, but we all agree on where it shouldn’t be. The scale does not look anything like the BGL numbers you are used Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

What’s Normal Blood Sugar?

What’s Normal Blood Sugar?

Thank you for dropping in! If you need help lowering your blood sugar level, check out my books at Amazon or Smashwords. If you’re outside of the U.S., Smashwords may be the best source. —Steve Parker, M.D * * * Physicians focus so much on disease that we sometimes lose sight of what’s healthy and normal. For instance, the American Diabetes Association defines “tight” control of diabetes to include sugar levels as high as 179 mg/dl (9.9 mmol/l) when measured two hours after a meal. In contrast, young adults without diabetes two hours after a meal are usually in the range of 90 to 110 mg/dl (5.0–6.1 mmol/l). What Is a Normal Blood Sugar Level? The following numbers refer to average blood sugar (glucose) levels in venous plasma, as measured in a lab. Portable home glucose meters measure sugar in capillary whole blood. Many, but not all, meters in 2011 are calibrated to compare directly to venous plasma levels. Fasting blood sugar after a night of sleep and before breakfast: 85 mg/dl (4.7 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 110 mg/dl (6.1 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 95 mg/dl (5.3 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 85 mg/dl (4.7 mmol/l) (The aforementioned meal derives 50–55% of its energy from carbohydrate) ♦ ♦ ♦ Ranges of blood sugar for young healthy non-diabetic adults: Fasting blood sugar: 70–90 mg/dl (3.9–5.0 mmol/l) One hour after a typical meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.9 mmol/l) Two hours after a typical meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.1 mmol/l) Five hours after a typical meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.9–5.00 mmol/l) Blood sugars tend to be a bit lower in pregnant women. ♦ ♦ ♦ What Level of Blood Sugar Defines Diabetes and Prediabetes? According to the 2007 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists: Prediabetes: Continue reading >>

A1c At 7.2 And Doc Is Pleased

A1c At 7.2 And Doc Is Pleased

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Since starting on the MM pump 15 months ago, my A1c has been reduced from just under 11 to 7.2 on my last lab test (March). I told my Endocrinologist that I would prefer to get my A1c below 6 because this is the range I see many members reporting on this forum. He told me that I should not compare my numbers with the typical type 2 who is not insulin dependent. Based on my history, he stated that I should be very pleased with my progress and does not expect me to show results significantly below 7. Does this make sense to any other insulin dependent type 2's ?. Congratulations on the drop in a1c. That shows a lot of hard work. I can't comment as a T2, but I can say that getting into the 5s with insulin can be difficult as you run the risks of a lot of lows. I hit the low 6s with minimal lows and not too many spikes and was happy with that. I think your doc has the right approach in that he was encouraging with the progress and doesn't want you to overdo the insulin. Also, don't compare yourself with others. Everyone is different and you will achieve what works for you. Don, I'm not a T2 but my endo has told me that he does not want my a1C below 7 nor does he think I can achieve it without many severe lows. I'm working now to prove him wrong. Don, I'm not a T2 but my endo has told me that he does not want my a1C below 7 nor does he think I can achieve it without many severe lows. I'm working now to prove him wrong. I've always found that an a1c of 7 means a number of highs that can be controlled without risking lows. I ran at about 7 for a while and was not happy. My endo encouraged me and I g Continue reading >>

What Does A 7.2 A1c Mean?

What Does A 7.2 A1c Mean?

Experience: B.A.M.S{Ayurveda Physician}Worked in various clinical departments like Medicine,ER,Gynae The A1c test is used primarily to monitor the glucose control of diabetics over time. In poorly controlled diabetes, its 8.0% or above, and in well controlled patients it's less than 7.0%. It has been proven that an HbA1c level of 7.2 or less greatly reduces the risk of complications from diabetes. However, any reduction in haemoglobin A1c is a benefit. Reply to Dr AMIT MUNJAL's Post: I haven't been diagnosed with diabetes yet. Will this one test diagnose me? Health Professional: Dr Amit Munjal , Physicianreplied 11 years ago A1C at 7.2 % is not a diagnostic test but more useful for screening.It suggest mean sugar level around 150 mg/dl in past three months.You should further be tested for Fasting Blood sugar ,Post parandial blood sugar and GTT(glucose tolerance test) for more accurate diagnosis. A1C at 4% - 6% is diagnostic non diabetic range. Reply to Dr AMIT MUNJAL's Post: I do not accept these responses. They are nothing that I haven't already googled myself. Experience: B.A.M.S{Ayurveda Physician}Worked in various clinical departments like Medicine,ER,Gynae A new question is answered every 9 seconds Ask an ExpertExperts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm. Get a Professional AnswerVia email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site. Ask follow up questions if you need to. 100% Satisfaction GuaranteeRate the answer you receive. Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com. JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal Continue reading >>

Patient Comments: Hemoglobin A1c Test - High Results

Patient Comments: Hemoglobin A1c Test - High Results

I have been doing a lot of research on CIN1. I was 26 when my doctor told me I have cervical dysplasia (CIN1), January of 20017. I didn't think anything of it. But then she told me I have HPV high risk E6/E7 mRNA. One day I was looking through my medical records online and discovered I had CIN1 3 years ago July of 2014 and my doctor never told me. Now I am stressing over it because my periods are irregular and when I do have them they are strange. Also the year of 2014 I told my doctor I was having clots the size of 2 half dollars put together and she didn't say anything either. I get pelvic pain sometimes. She did a biopsy and I was positive for CIN1 and high risk HPV and ascus. I don't know what I should do, maybe I should get a new doctor. In May 2015 I was really tired, lethargic and bloated all the time. I was so constipated and miserable. I had been gluten free for 4 years by self-diagnosis. Finally, I went to a gastroenterologist. My blood work came back positive for Helicobacter pylori. The doctor said that H. pylori causes similar symptoms as gluten allergies. I had an endoscopy and colonoscopy which showed all of the internal inflammation and prior damage from the bacteria. It seemed to be dormant so there was no need for eradication, however the prescription acid reflux pills made me sick so I stopped that. Now I take probiotics and manuka honey and feel great. Try to avoid the prescription drugs. I have to go back for a check up to see if the bacteria is gone. I just had a laparoscopy 2 days ago and other than feeling full and bloated from the gas and a soreness around the incisions, I feel pretty good. The day of the surgery when I came home, I was very sleepy and slept for almost 2 days with getting up, except here and there to use the bathroom and eat. My Continue reading >>

My A1c Is At 7.2, At Present. What Can I Do In The Short Term To Lower This To 6.5 Or Lower.

My A1c Is At 7.2, At Present. What Can I Do In The Short Term To Lower This To 6.5 Or Lower.

Question Originally asked by Community Member flybye My A1c Is At 7.2, At Present. What Can I Do In The Short Term To Lower This To 6.5 Or Lower. Hello, my A1C is at 7.2 at present. What can I do in the short-term to lower this to 6.5 or lower? Answer Hi there, flybye - A doctor is always going to be your best source of advice on dealing with your diabetes, so you should check with him/her about the safest ways to lower your A1C levels. However, I can tell you that there are some dietary changes you can make that can really help you with this. Cutting your consumption of fatty foods, carbs, and high-calorie foods will lower A1C levels, for example. You should also try to avoid eating such foods and white flour, potatoes, rice, and noodles, as well as sugary foods such as ice cream. Fried foods and lunch meats also boosts A1C levels. Here are some other links that you might find helpful: Teaching Type 2 Diabetes Patients Decreases Hemoglobin A1C Levels American Diabetes Association Convention Day 2: A1C Levels Best of luck to you! You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

Why Should My A1c Be 7 Per Cent Or Less?

Why Should My A1c Be 7 Per Cent Or Less?

Share: Over the last several years a significant amount of research has proven that control matters, and good control is now defined as an A1C of < 7 per cent. What is an A1C? An A1C test shows your blood glucose control over the last 2 or 3 months. Research from both the Diabetes Control & Complications Trial (DCCT) and its follow up study (EDIC) proves that having an A1C of 7 per cent is definitely worthwhile for persons with type 1 diabetes. Exactly 1441 volunteers aged 13 to 39, all with type 1 diabetes, took part. These people agreed to randomly be assigned to either conventional treatment - taking about two insulin injections a day - or to intensive treatment (IT) - taking either multiple dose insulin (MDI, about 4 injections a day) or an insulin pump. During the study the A1C of each group was compared: the conventional therapy group had an average A1C of 9.1 per cent (normal 4-6 per cent) the intensive therapy group had an average A1C of 7.2 per cent The purpose was to finally demonstrate whether or not good blood sugar control was really important to prevent the complications of diabetes. And indeed it is – as you can see below, complications developed at a much lower rate in the intensively treated group compared to the conventional group. Effect of intensive therapy on: Those with no complications at beginning of study: Those with some complication at beginning of study: Eye Disease (retinopathy) 76% overall reduction 54% less progression 45% less risk of needing laser therapy Kidney Disease (nephropathy) 34% less microalbuminuria 56% less proteinuria Nerve Disease (neuropathy) 69% less occurrence 57% less occurrence Heart Disease Trend towards reduction in risk factors Trend towards reduction in risk factors The reduction in risk for eye disease (the prima Continue reading >>

What Are The Normal A1c Levels For Children?

What Are The Normal A1c Levels For Children?

The A1c blood test is one of the laboratory tests used to diagnose diabetes and an important measure of average blood sugar levels in someone who has diabetes. This test determines the amount of glucose or sugar that has attached to the blood's hemoglobin -- the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells -- during the 3-month lifespan of these cells. Target A1c levels have been established to help healthcare providers, as well as children with diabetes and their families, understand the blood sugar goals needed to reduce the risk of the long-term complications of diabetes. While there are some situations where the A1c result may not be reliable, as a rule this test is accurate and an essential part of a child's diabetes management program. Video of the Day Normal A1c Levels Diagnostic criteria for children is similar to the guidelines used in adults, and the A1c is one of the tests used to diagnose diabetes. A1c levels are reported as a percentage, and often the estimated average glucose (eAG) -- a number calculated from the A1c reading -- is also included with the results. Using the same units as a blood glucose meter, the eAG makes understanding the A1c result a bit easier by comparing the A1c to average blood sugar levels. A normal, nondiabetic A1c level is below 5.7 percent, which reflects an eAG below 117 mg/dL. The level used to diagnose diabetes is 6.5 percent and above, which reflects an eAG of 140 mg/dL or higher. A1c levels above normal but below the diabetes range fit into a prediabetes range. Target A1c Levels Along with its role in diagnosing diabetes, the A1c test is performed between 2 and 4 times per year to estimate average blood sugar levels over the previous 3 months. This test is used to monitor the effectiveness of diabetes treatment and to determin Continue reading >>

Hba1c Of 7.2 - Medication Necessary?

Hba1c Of 7.2 - Medication Necessary?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My Hba1c level in January this year was 7.2 and my GP prescribed metformin. I tried the regular for 1 month, had to come off due to digestive problems, then tried slow release but after 2 months it too seemed to neutralise my digestion and I felt pretty awful; in fact my blood sugar readings worsened, and I came off, with an initial IMPROVEMENT in levels. In my July test, after 3 months of no medication, reading was again 7.2 but my doctor still wants me to medicate, and suggests sitagliptin. I am reluctant to try something that is also reported to give digestive problems. I have had mild digestive problems most of my life, now 54. However am fully aware of the dangers of diabetes. Is 7.2 a level at which I need to medicate, or can it be postponed? I did feel that the digestive problems seemed to make me sufficiently ill that the cure was as bad or worse than the diabetes, but I am of course just not sure. My GP is even suggesting insulin, but surely 7.2 is too low a level to justify that? I was first diagnosed pre-diabetic 8 years ago and lost a lot of weight giving 2 years of perfect non-diabetic results, and a "you are not diabetic" from my GP, but although have kept most of weight off it seems to have eventually caught up with me. I was diagnosed earlier this year with an HbA1c of 7.8% in March. That was down to 7% at the end of May after eliminating all added sugar, sweet treats, most crisps and junk food and by adding a lot more fresh and raw. I was trying to follow a low glyceamic index diet at that point. After the last Hba1c I went low carb, eliminating bread, pasta, rice, potatoes and anything obviously starchy and testing my blood several t Continue reading >>

Help With 7.2 A1c, Undiagnosed Type-ii, Can't Go To Doctor Yet.

Help With 7.2 A1c, Undiagnosed Type-ii, Can't Go To Doctor Yet.

Help with 7.2 A1C, undiagnosed Type-II, can't go to doctor yet. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Help with 7.2 A1C, undiagnosed Type-II, can't go to doctor yet. Hi, I got a reading of 7.2 on a health fair A1C recently. I have not been been to a doctor, and this was unknown previously. I plan on becoming an independent contractor for my job, and will need to get my own health insurance, hence my dilemma that if I visit a physician, and diagnosed with Type-II, I will never get a policy on my own, but may not be able to anyway on my BMI I have tested my BS 5 times a day for the last 2 weeks, and have 130-140 FBS, and 150-170 2 hours after a meal. I have had a spike or two over 200 is I ate something sweet. So all signs lead to Type-II. I plan on trying to confirm my A1C with a mail-in Relion test. I am not looking for a medical diagnosis, but I would like advice if I can initially manage this thru diet change and exercise initially until I can atleast apply for a personal policy and visit a physician for possible meds. I would rather not go on meds at all. I am 6'4", 350lbs and otherwise in good health, and I had an A1C about 2 years ago at 6.1, but did not heed the warnings. I am a Carb Junkie (as my wife calls me though) Bread is my weakness. Not into sweets etc., but I actually crave carbohydrates. If I lose a significant amount of weight (I can't do a completely low carb diet but I did lose 100-lb 20 years ago so I know I can do it., and start an exercise routine. (Both of which I am willing to do at this point) I guess my question is, is my A1C not in the dangerous level that I can try the above and see if I can get it dow Continue reading >>

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