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A1c Level 11

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c, often abbreviated HbA1c, is a form of hemoglobin (a blood pigment that carries oxygen) that is bound to glucose. The blood test for HbA1c level is routinely performed in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Blood HbA1c levels are reflective of how well diabetes is controlled. The normal range for level for hemoglobin A1c is less than 6%. HbA1c also is known as glycosylated, or glycated hemoglobin. HbA1c levels are reflective of blood glucose levels over the past six to eight weeks and do not reflect daily ups and downs of blood glucose. High HbA1c levels indicate poorer control of diabetes than levels in the normal range. HbA1c is typically measured to determine how well a type 1 or type 2 diabetes treatment plan (including medications, exercise, or dietary changes) is working. How Is Hemoglobin A1c Measured? The test for hemoglobin A1c depends on the chemical (electrical) charge on the molecule of HbA1c, which differs from the charges on the other components of hemoglobin. The molecule of HbA1c also differs in size from the other components. HbA1c may be separated by charge and size from the other hemoglobin A components in blood by a procedure called high pressure (or performance) liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC separates mixtures (for example, blood) into its various components by adding the mixtures to special liquids and passing them under pressure through columns filled with a material that separates the mixture into its different component molecules. HbA1c testing is done on a blood sample. Because HbA1c is not affected by short-term fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations, for example, due to meals, blood can be drawn for HbA1c testing without regard to when food was eaten. Fasting for the blood test is not necessary. What Are Continue reading >>

Management Of Blood Glucose In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Management Of Blood Glucose In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus focus on three areas: intensive lifestyle intervention that includes at least 150 minutes per week of physical activity, weight loss with an initial goal of 7 percent of baseline weight, and a low-fat, reduced-calorie diet; aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors (i.e., hypertension, dyslipidemia, and microalbuminuria) with the use of aspirin, statins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; and normalization of blood glucose levels (hemoglobin A1C level less than 7 percent). Insulin resistance, decreased insulin secretion, and increased hepatic glucose output are the hallmarks of type 2 diabetes, and each class of medication targets one or more of these defects. Metformin, which decreases hepatic glucose output and sensitizes peripheral tissues to insulin, has been shown to decrease mortality rates in patients with type 2 diabetes and is considered a first-line agent. Other medications include sulfonylureas and nonsulfonylurea secretagogues, alpha glucosidase inhibitors, and thiazolidinediones. Insulin can be used acutely in patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes to normalize blood glucose, or it can be added to a regimen of oral medication to improve glycemic control. Except in patients taking multiple insulin injections, home monitoring of blood glucose levels has questionable utility, especially in relatively well-controlled patients. Its use should be tailored to the needs of the individual patient. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, is directly responsible for more than 73,000 deaths annually and is a contributing factor in more than 220,000 deaths.1 It is the leading cause of kidney failure and new cases of blindness in a Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

Ac1 Level Of 11 - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

Ac1 Level Of 11 - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

My husbands new doctor ( endocrinologist) put him on the Novolog flex pin. He said that my husband AC1 level means he will end up blind or on dialysis. Does this mean this is for certain? My husband currently takes lisinopril, lipitor, metaformin, lantus injections 18mm, Novolog 5 unites ( before meals), and glyburide. He is only 39 years old and has gotten to the point where he will call off of work 4 out of 5 times a week from feeling ill. I am very worried but I dont tell him because he is the " tough guy." Do you think this is a medical disability at this point and how can I be supportive without making him feel uncomfortable? I will attempt to offer some information to help you. First of all I would like to address your husbands A1c lab result. The A1c test is used primarily to monitor the glucose control of diabetics over time. Depending on the type of diabetes that you have, how well your diabetes is controlled, and your doctor, your A1c may be measured 2 to 4 times each year. A 1% change in an A1c result reflects a change of about 30 mg/dL in average blood glucose. For instance, an A1c of 6% corresponds to an average glucose of 135 mg/dL, while an A1c of 9% corresponds to an average glucose of 240 mg/dL. With this information in mind your husbands A1c of 11% indicates an average glucose of 300 mg/dl which is extremely high and can result in damage to several organs in the human body. The data presented indicates that you should approach your husband and encourage him to do anything he can to safely regulate his glucose levels and SEE HIS PHYSICIAN. In this case being a tough guy can result in very serious consequences. Please urge him to take this matter seriously. I hope I have helped and if you need any additional information please feel free to contact me. Continue reading >>

Your A1c Levels – What Goal To Shoot For?

Your A1c Levels – What Goal To Shoot For?

Measuring Your A1C An A1C test gives you and your provider insight into all of your blood glucose ups and downs over the past two or three months. It’s like the 24/7 video of your blood sugar levels. Observing your A1C results and your blood glucose (also known as blood sugar) results together over time are two of the key tools you and your health care provider can use to monitor your progress and revise your therapy as needed over the years. Recent research is changing the way health professionals look at A1C levels. Instead of setting tight controls across the board, a healthy A1C level is now a moving target that depends on the patient. In the past, an A1C of 7 percent was considered a healthy goal for everyone. Yehuda Handelsman, M.D., medical director of the Metabolic Institute of America in Tarzana, California, says experts now recommend taking a patient-centered approach to managing A1C levels, which means evaluating goals based on individual diabetes management needs and personal and lifestyle preferences. Current ADA Goals The 2015 American Diabetes Association (ADA) Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes advise the following A1C levels: • 6.5 percent or less: This is a more stringent goal. Health care providers might suggest this for people who can achieve this goal without experiencing a lot of hypoglycemia episodes or other negative effects of having lower blood glucose levels. This may be people who have not had diabetes for many years (short duration); people with type 2 diabetes using lifestyle changes and/or a glucose-lowering medication that doesn’t cause hypoglycemia; younger adults with many years to live healthfully; and people with no significant heart and blood vessel disease. • 7 percent: This is a reasonable A1C goal for many adults with d Continue reading >>

I Have An A1c Of 11%. What Does That Mean To Me Now, In My Immediate Future, And In The Long Term?

I Have An A1c Of 11%. What Does That Mean To Me Now, In My Immediate Future, And In The Long Term?

A: An A1C of 11% means that your body isn’t getting enough insulin and/or isn’t using insulin as well as it should. For most people with diabetes, their A1C goal is less than 7%. A1C results that are constantly higher than 7% are likely to increase your risk of complications down the road, including heart disease, kidney damage, eye disease and nerve damage. The good news is that lowering your A1C by 1% can lower your risk of complications by up to 40%. In the shorter-term, a high A1C result indicates that your blood glucose levels are too high. High blood glucose, if left untreated, can cause fatigue, frequent urination, dry mouth, thirst, blurry vision and cuts/sores that are slow to heal. It’s very important that you meet with your healthcare provider to discuss a treatment plan that will lower your blood glucose and your A1C . Continue reading >>

28 Years Old 11.1% Hemoglobin A1c - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

28 Years Old 11.1% Hemoglobin A1c - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

Hi everyone. My name is Pete and I'm new to the site/forum. I recently had a company-paid-for wellness screening. They did an array of blood tests and I wasn't too thrilled with the results. The most distressing of the batch was my Hemoglobin A1c...which was 11%...Some background: I'm 28 years old and have been fairly healthy. My blood pressure has been borderline and in the past year I've lost about 28 pounds and are down to around 264 now. I try to eat fairly well and only really eat out maybe once or twice a week. I don't get too much exercise besides what I do at work, (which involves a lot of walking around but nothing too athletic really). My father is a Type-II diabetic who got his when he was something like 48 years old. Neither my brother, sister or mother have it but I know diabetes runs in my father's side of the family. Needless to say I'm kind of freaking out a little bit because I really don't want to go down the road of having to take insulin or becoming a full-blown insulin-dependent diabetic. What can i do to lower my A1c levels??? To fill in things a little more.. some things in the past year have concerned me a little bit. I find myself having to urinate a little more often than usual (I attributed this really to drinking more at work but it's a quick onset of an urge to go. I have no incontinence issues or anything like that). I've noticed some difficulty in getting and maintaining strong erections as well...these things have led me to thing they must be correlated with my A1c level or my borderline high blood pressure. So far I've just been focusing on losing weight and planning on stepping up my exercise before deciding to go on meds for any of this. Continue reading >>

Understanding Your A1c Reading With Your Eag: Estimated Average Glucose

Understanding Your A1c Reading With Your Eag: Estimated Average Glucose

Every three to six months we have our A1C measured"but what does that number really mean? You know it’s a measure of your average blood sugar reading, but when was the last time your blood glucose monitor gave you a percentage? Your A1C is essentially a measurement of the Advanced Glycogenated End-products that have accumulated in your blood from blood sugar levels"the higher our blood sugars are, the more AGEs are present in our blood. These AGEs are also what lead to various complications we’re warned about: nerve damage, retinopathy, etc. So, as usual, our goal is to reduce our A1C which will reduce our AGEs, and we do this by controlling our blood sugars better. The Joslin Diabetes Center recently published an article about a new way to report your A1C so you can translate that number to the numbers you see on your monitor. This is your eAG= Estimated Average Glucose. So what does it mean to you when your doctor says your A1C is 8%? According to the Joslin article an A1C of 8% means your eAG is 183, which means your blood sugars run usually between 147 to 217. My last A1C was 7.6%. This means my blood sugars run between 140 to 200 on average through the day. The lowest A1C I’ve ever had was 6.2% and the highest I’ve had was a few years ago when I started college, at 8.4%. **Here’s a chart for your A1C readings translated to your eAG: 12% = 298 (240 - 347) 11% = 269 (217 - 314) 10% = 240 (193 - 282) 9% = 212 (170 -249) 8% = 183 (147 - 217) 7% = 154 (123 - 185) 6% = 126 ( 100 - 152)** So, if your A1C is 11%, your average glucose reading is 269, which means ninty-five percent of the day your blood sugar is somewhere between 217 to 314. Numbers like those makes it much more difficult to ignore that 11% We all know we can’t be feeling very well or be treating Continue reading >>

In Search Of: The Highest Diabetes A1c In History

In Search Of: The Highest Diabetes A1c In History

My most recent A1C was nothing to be proud of, but I consoled myself with the thought that it was hardly the worst in history. That got me wondering: What was the all-time worst A1C? Who holds this dubious record, and how high is it possible to go? I decided to pound the pavement and try to find out. So where to start when looking for a diabetes record? Well, with the Guinness Book of World Records, of course. But oddly, the Guinness people don’t seem to have any listings related to A1Cs. They do, however, report that Michael Patrick Buonocore survived a blood sugar of 2,656 mg/dL upon admittance to the ER in East Stroudsburg, PA, on March 23, 2008. Michael was a T1 kiddo at the time, and that record-high sugar level was part of his diagnosis experience. So does Michael also hold the record for top A1C? No. Because while he’s living (thankfully) proof that stratospheric blood sugar levels are possible, a sky-scraping A1C requires both altitude and time. Remember that A1Cs provide a three-month average of our blood sugars. Individual high BG readings, even crazy-high ones, don’t alter the test as much as you’d think if they last only a short time. Because type 1 in kids Michael's age hit so quickly, I figured his A1C would have been rather middle of the road. It takes a slow burn to make an A1C boil. But just to be sure, I reached out to his parents, who tell me his A1C was 11.9 at diagnosis. Higher than I expected, but not too high given the four-digit BG reading. (If his 2,656 had been his average blood sugar for three months, his A1C would have been roughly 95! Yes, that’s 95.0, not 9.5). The highest A1C turns out to be a tricky piece of data to ferret out. If you try Google, you find a gazillion people talking about their own personal highest A1Cs, and comp Continue reading >>

A1c Test

A1c Test

Print Overview The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well you're managing your diabetes. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications. Why it's done An international committee of experts from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the International Diabetes Federation, recommend that the A1C test be the primary test used to diagnose prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. After a diabetes diagnosis, the A1C test is used to monitor your diabetes treatment plan. Since the A1C test measures your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months instead of your blood sugar level at a specific point in time, it is a better reflection of how well your diabetes treatment plan is working overall. Your doctor will likely use the A1C test when you're first diagnosed with diabetes. This also helps establish a baseline A1C level. The test may then need to be repeated while you're learning to control your blood sugar. Later, how often you need the A1C test depends on the type of diabetes you have, your treatment plan and how well you're managing your blood sugar. For example, the A1C test may be recommended: Once every year if you have prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes Twice a year if Continue reading >>

Type 2s: Insulin Early Is Easy, Insulin Late Is Not

Type 2s: Insulin Early Is Easy, Insulin Late Is Not

I keep reading postings here and there on the web from people with Type 2 diabetes that say something like, "My A1c was 11.5% even with Metformin, so my doctor told me it was time to go on insulin." It is postings like this that bring home to me why so many Type 2s develop terrible complications, and even more importantly, why even those who are taking insulin often have dangerously high blood sugars. The most conservative of medical groups--the ADA--tells doctors that an A1c over 7% is going to cause serious diabetic complications like blindness and kidney failure. Yet these people's doctors have encouraged them to dick around with oral drugs when their A1cs were 10% or higher! The years they've spent at those dangerously high blood sugar levels waiting for oral drugs to do what all the research evidence shows oral drugs cannot do have wreaked havoc on their organs that may not be completely reversible, no matter what their blood sugars might be in the future. In fact, a recent survey I read somewhere on the web found that most family doctors don't put their patients on even an oral drug until the patient has spent a year with an A1c of 8% or higher. That is a whole, long year where dangerously high blood sugars are producing early retinopathy, advancing neuropathy, and making small changes that lead to kidney failure. Since none of the oral drugs is capable of lowering A1c much more than 1%, this kind of treatment is criminal. A patient whose A1c is 11.5% on metformin probably started out with an A1c of 12% or even higher. If you don't believe me, go read the Prescribing Information for each of the common diabetes drugs. They show exactly what the median change in A1c is that their drugs can achieve, and you'll see it is rarely much more than a 1% drop in A1c. For a p Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c definition and facts Hemoglobin A1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells that sugar molecules stick to, usually for the life of the red blood cell (about three months). The higher the level of glucose in the blood, the higher the level of hemoglobin A1c is detectable on red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1c levels correlate with average levels of glucose in the blood over an approximately three-month time period. Normal ranges for hemoglobin A1c in people without diabetes is about 4% to 5.9%. People with diabetes with poor glucose control have hemoglobin A1c levels above 7%. Hemoglobin A1c levels are routinely used to determine blood sugar control over time in people with diabetes. Decreasing hemoglobin A1c levels by 1% may decrease the risk of microvascular complications (for example, diabetic eye, nerve, or kidney disease) by 10%. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be checked, according to the American Diabetic Association, every six months in individuals with stable blood sugar control, and every three months if the person is trying to establish stable blood sugar control. Hemoglobin A1c has many other names such as glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and HbA1c. To explain what hemoglobin A1c is, think in simple terms. Sugar sticks to things, and when it has been stuck to something for a long time it's harder to the get sugar (glucose) off. In the body, sugar sticks too, particularly to proteins. The red blood cells that circulate in the body live for about three months before they die. When sugar (glucose) sticks to these red blood cells by binding to hemoglobin A1c, it gives us an idea of how much glucose has been around in the blood for the preceding three months. Hemoglobin A1c is a minor component of hemoglobin to which gl Continue reading >>

How To Lower A1c Levels

How To Lower A1c Levels

Reader Approved A1C is a form of glucose in the body that is regularly measured in people who suffer from type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A1C is generally used to determine a diabetic’s average blood sugar levels from previous months, and can aid healthcare providers in prescribing and recommending treatments to those with diabetes. A1C levels can generally be lowered by practicing healthy living, including adhering to proper nutrition, exercising regularly, and managing stress. 1 Add a higher number of fruits and vegetables to your diet. Fruits and vegetables contain a number of antioxidants that promote better health in general, and are also high in fiber, which studies have shown can contribute to better blood sugar management.[1] 2 Eat more beans and legumes. According to Harvard University Health Services, one-half cup (118 ml) of beans will provide you with one-third of your daily fiber requirement. Beans will also slow down the digestion process, and help stabilize blood sugar levels following meals.[2] 3 Consume more fat-free milk and yogurt. Fat-free milk and yogurt are rich in calcium and vitamin D, which have been shown to contribute to better blood sugar management and weight loss, the latter of which can help improve most cases of type 2 diabetes. 4 Increase your intake of nuts and fish. Most nuts and fatty fish including tuna, mackerel, and salmon contain omega-3 fatty acids that will help lower insulin resistance, regulate blood sugar levels, and contribute to better heart health. Nuts can also benefit type 2 diabetics who are trying to lower their cholesterol levels. 5 Spice your food with cinnamon. Although cinnamon is generally associated with sweets and desserts, research has shown that consuming one-half tsp. (2 ml) cinnamon per day can improve insulin Continue reading >>

Understanding Your A1c

Understanding Your A1c

The A1C is a blood test that helps determine if your diabetes management plan is working well. (Both Type 1 and Type 2 take this test.) It’s done every 2-3 months to find out what your average blood sugar has been. (You may also hear this test called glycosylated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c, and HbA1c.) A1c is the most common name for it though. How the test works Essentially, the test can tell how much sugar is in the blood stream by looking for proteins (hemoglobins). When glucose (sugar) enters the blood, it binds to the protein in the red blood cells. This binding creates “glycated hemoglobin”. The more sugar in the blood, the more glycated hemoglobin. It’s important to test your blood sugar levels (BGLs) throughout the day; however, an A1C test gives you a bigger picture with a long-term average of those blood sugar levels. What do these numbers mean? The A1c is an average of what your blood sugar levels have been over the 3-month period. In general, the higher your A1C number, the higher your likelihood of diabetes complications. (You don’t want a high A1C; it means there is too much sugar in your blood and your body isn’t absorbing it.) A1C number 4.6 – 6.0 Normal (does not have diabetes) 5.7 – 6.4 Pre-diabetes (warning that someone may develop Type 2 or have the beginning onset of Type 1) 6.7+ Diabetes (someone diagnosed with diabetes) <7.0 – 7.5 Target range (for adults diagnosed with diabetes – children diagnosed with diabetes) This target range varies between individuals, some people naturally run a little higher, some lower. It is important to note that especially in children a higher A1C (of 7.5) is recommended. The A1C number will help you and your doctor determine though if your diabetes management plan is working well. Continue reading >>

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