diabetestalk.net

A1c Is 13

Viewer Comments: Hba1c Test - High Levels

Viewer Comments: Hba1c Test - High Levels

Viewer Comments are not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on eMedicineHealth. The opinions expressed in the comments section are of the author and the author alone. eMedicineHealth does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment. If you think you have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. ANORO is only approved for use in COPD. ANORO is NOT approved for use in asthma. People with asthma who take long-acting beta2-adrenergic agonist (LABA) medicines, such as vilanterol (one of the medicines in ANORO), have an increased risk of death from asthma problems. It is not known if LABA medicines increase the risk of death in people with COPD. Get emergency medical care if your breathing worsens quickly or if use of your rescue inhaler does not relieve your breathing problems. It is not known if ANORO is safe and effective in people with asthma. Do not use ANORO more often than prescribed. Do not take ANORO with other medicines that contain a LABA or an anticholinergic for any reason. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take and about all of your health conditions. ANORO can cause serious side effects, including: sudden breathing problems immediately after inhaling your medicine. If you experience this, stop using ANORO and call your healthcare provider right away. serious allergic reactions. Call your healthcare provider or get emergency medical care if you get any of the following symptoms: new or worsened eye problems, including acute narrow-angle glaucoma that can cause permanent loss of vision if not treated. Symptoms may include: urinar Continue reading >>

A Life-changing Critically High Diabetes Diagnosis

A Life-changing Critically High Diabetes Diagnosis

This post is a hybrid re-post from my food blog (April) and my hiking blog (June), where I have previously shared about my diagnosis. Since those posts, some aspects of my diagnosis and treatment have changed. The ongoing challenges and discoveries in this diabetic journey have prompted this already overextended blogger to yes…start another blog, about my diabetes. There is so much about this disease to learn, and so many frustrations. I need someplace to talk about it without cluttering up my other blogs and my Facebook stream. And if my journey can help even one other person, it’s worth the extra blogging time. My Diagnosis On April 14, 2014, my life changed. That is the day that my husband Jeff and I went together to my doctor’s office early in the morning to learn the results of the full physical my doctor performed on me a few days prior, on April 10th. During the actual physical, when I described my symptoms, the doctor initially suspected a hyperactive thyroid. When she got my lab results back that morning, my doctor was shocked. The doctor diagnosed me with a very extreme case of Type 2 Diabetes, along with extremely high cholesterol. I would never in a million years think this would be my diagnosis. The doctor was very upset when she went over my lab work with me. My A1C was 15! (I recently learned it was actually 15.8, almost a 16!) To put that in context, diabetics should be at A1C 7 or lower, and a 13 is considered dangerously high. My doctor said that in 30 years of practicing medicine, she has never had a patient at that level. She couldn’t believe I hadn’t lapsed into a diabetic coma. My cholesterol was sky high (378!). My resting heart rate was the highest she’d ever encountered. She said I was near cardiac arrest. She said I was at fatally h Continue reading >>

What Is Highest A1c Test Can Someone Get?

What Is Highest A1c Test Can Someone Get?

What is highest A1C test can someone get? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. What is highest A1C test can someone get? I got some bad news about my A1C test and my A1C is 11 which I know is bad but wondering how high can someone go on a A1C test? I think the highest I've ever read about was around 25%. Those kind of readings are taken at the ER. My A1c, in the ER, was 15.3% and it wasn't like I didn't feel it coming. Problem was...I had no idea I had diabetes nor what the symptoms were. I just thought that was what you felt like when you got old. Oh, and your 11? Um, we're not gonna tolerate that kind of a number here...you're gonna have to bring that number down. :T When DX'd mine was 13.8 and have seen some say they had 14.5. What have your meals been like...what do you normally eat? How often do you test yourself? What medication do you use to help control your BG's? I turned 50 and feel like my diabetes is much worse now. Now I can eat anything and feel my BS go up or down which in past I felt nothing. I wonder if my pancreas is starting to fail? I'm on insulin. I drink alot of water and did drink diet pop but have quit it. Hey Bountyman - we're twins! Mine was 15.3 too. Had a lovely hospital stay and emerged with a T1 diagnosis. Rob - perhaps you're in need of some insulin. Please check with your doctor. If you're taking your meds and getting different results, you need to change something. Using insulin is not a sign of failure on your part. It's just a hormone that your body may not be producing in sufficient quantities. It might make you feel much better. Don't wait to see how high your A1C can get, as a bout with DKA Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c And C-reactive Protein Are Independently Associated With Blunted Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping In Obesity-related Prediabetes

Hemoglobin A1c And C-reactive Protein Are Independently Associated With Blunted Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping In Obesity-related Prediabetes

Hemoglobin A1c and C-reactive protein are independently associated with blunted nocturnal blood pressure dipping in obesity-related prediabetes Hypertension Research volume 41, pages 3338 (2018) Blunted nocturnal dipping in blood pressure (BP) is associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in middle-aged/older adults. The prevalence of blunted nocturnal BP dipping is higher in persons with obesity and diabetes, conditions that are also associated with elevated aortic stiffness and inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that elevated glycemia, inflammation and aortic stiffness would be inversely associated with the magnitude of nocturnal systolic BP dipping among middle-aged/older adults with obesity at high CVD risk. Twenty-four hour ambulatory BP monitoring, aortic stiffness (carotidfemoral pulse wave velocity, CF-PWV), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and inflammation (C-reactive protein, CRP) were measured in 86 middle-aged/older adults with obesity and at least one other CVD risk factor (age 4074 years; 34 male/52 female; body mass index=36.70.5 kg m2; HbA1c=5.70.04%). In the entire cohort, CRP (=0.400.20, P=0.04), but not HbA1c or CF-PWV was independently associated with systolic BP dipping percent (Model R2=0.07, P=0.12). In stratified (that is, presence or absence of prediabetes) multiple linear regression analysis, HbA1c (=6.242.6, P=0.02) and CRP (=0.570.2, P=0.01), but not CF-PWV (=0.14 2.6, P=0.74), were independently associated with systolic BP dipping percent (Model R2=0.32, P<0.01) in obese adults with prediabetes but were absent in obese adults without prediabetes (Model R2=0.01 P=0.95). However, nocturnal systolic BP dipping percent (P=0.65), CF-PWV (P=0.68) and CRP (P=0.59) were similar between participants with and without prediabetes. These d Continue reading >>

What Does Your A1c Number Really Mean?

What Does Your A1c Number Really Mean?

We dFolk are bombarded with numbers, goals, and targets. We’re frequently told where we should be, but not how high our risk is when we can’t reach our targets. Here, we break down A1C numbers into a simple green-light, yellow-light, red-light format, to give you perspective on when (and how much) to worry, when to relax, when to call your doc, and when to call 911. Green-light A1C score For most people, the target for A1C, the green light, is between 6.0% and 6.9%. These numbers are commonly expressed simply as 6.0 and 6.9, without the % sign. If your A1C falls into this zone, you’re considered to be in control. For perspective, these numbers can be converted into “meter” numbers called estimated average glucose—eAG for short. The green light eAG range is 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/l) to 151 mg/dL (8.39 mmol/l). But what if your numbers are higher than target? Or lower than target? When are you actually in danger? Yellow-light A1C score If the light turns yellow as you approach the intersection, you need to either speed up or stop. Whichever is safe under the circumstances, right? If your A1C is between 7.0 and 8.9, you’ll be classified as “out of control.” But how much danger are you in? Frankly, it depends upon how close you are to either end of the spectrum. Yellow-light A1Cs are higher than is strictly healthy, but pose no immediate harm. However, the higher you are in this range, the closer you are to a red light. We’ll talk about just how serious that can be in a minute. I should point out that there are some special cases. If you’re a very young type 1, a yellow-light A1C score may be considered in-target for you until you get older. Similarly, if you’re an elderly type 2, or have a history of severe hypoglycemia, you doctor may choose to “green Continue reading >>

The Normal A1c Level

The Normal A1c Level

Wow Richard, 70 lbs? I have lost 24 lbs from low carb diet due to SIBO. It also helped my AC1 go down three points from 6.2 and my cholesterol is lower, which surprised me. I can’t afford to lose anymore weight because I was small to begin with. I had noticed much bigger people in the UK over the last 5 years compared to 15-20. Was quite shocking. I thought we had the patent on obesity! I am not diabetic that I know of but I had weird symptoms… Thirst that continued all day and night. My husband called me a camel. Dry eyes, rashes, strange dark discolouration on arm, under the arm to the side, some circulation issues and blurred vision. Eye specialist could not figure out why. Sores in the mouth also. I had observed about three weeks into super low carbs (30 Gms carb/day) that athlete’s foot symptom, sores in mouth and rashes were clearing up. So, lowering carbs for SIBO actually turned out for the best. By the way, I love your final paragraph. Research is what led me to SIBO diagnosis, and I then told the GI what to look for! He was barking up the wrong tree for months. Said I needed to eat more carbs so I don’t lose weight. Well, carbs fed the bacterial overgrowth!!! Dang fool. On Saturday, June 23, 2012, Diabetes Developments wrote: There is a new comment on the post “The Normal A1C Level”. Author: Richard Comment: I think part of the problem is that doctors are trained over many years to treat with pills, not with food. We continue to do what we are trained to do no matter what. I do believe they want to help us but don’t have the nutritional knowledge because that is not their expertise. When you have a hammer, etc. Nutritionist are no better unless they are those involved in research. They just peddle the messages they are told to. Then again, why wo Continue reading >>

Study Reveals Poor Disease Control Among Adolescents And Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Study Reveals Poor Disease Control Among Adolescents And Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

T1D Exchange Clinic Registry data find a stagnant situation as little has changed in 25 years; underscores need for new technologies to help teens manage their disease BOSTON, May 22, 2015 – In a sweeping analysis assessing the current state of diabetes treatment in the U.S., T1D Exchange researchers conclude that there remains considerable room for improving treatment outcomes in type 1 diabetes across all age groups, but especially for adolescents and young adults. The analysis provides the most up-to-date picture of diabetes treatment, underscoring the need to address barriers to care and implement new therapies and technologies that can help type 1 patients achieve optimal metabolic control. The findings, published today in a special issue of Diabetes Care, come from data collected by the T1D Exchange Clinic Registry. Researchers from the Exchange evaluated data from more than 16,000 patients ages two to 95. Data were collected twice: between September 2010 to August 2012 and again, from September 2013 to December 2014. A key area of study was glycemic control across the age spectrum, determined by examining Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, a standard test of average blood sugar levels over two to three months. According to the American Diabetes Association, the recommended target A1c level is less than 7 percent for adults with type 1 diabetes and less than 7.5 percent for youth under the age of 19. Researchers found that while 8.4 percent remains the average A1c level across the Registry, A1c levels are notably worse among 13 to 25-year olds. In fact, A1c levels for 13 to 17-year olds have barely changed since the initial Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) results published in 1992. Specifically: Adolescents in the Registry averaged a 9.0 percent A1c Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c definition and facts Hemoglobin A1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells that sugar molecules stick to, usually for the life of the red blood cell (about three months). The higher the level of glucose in the blood, the higher the level of hemoglobin A1c is detectable on red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1c levels correlate with average levels of glucose in the blood over an approximately three-month time period. Normal ranges for hemoglobin A1c in people without diabetes is about 4% to 5.9%. People with diabetes with poor glucose control have hemoglobin A1c levels above 7%. Hemoglobin A1c levels are routinely used to determine blood sugar control over time in people with diabetes. Decreasing hemoglobin A1c levels by 1% may decrease the risk of microvascular complications (for example, diabetic eye, nerve, or kidney disease) by 10%. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be checked, according to the American Diabetic Association, every six months in individuals with stable blood sugar control, and every three months if the person is trying to establish stable blood sugar control. Hemoglobin A1c has many other names such as glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and HbA1c. To explain what hemoglobin A1c is, think in simple terms. Sugar sticks to things, and when it has been stuck to something for a long time it's harder to the get sugar (glucose) off. In the body, sugar sticks too, particularly to proteins. The red blood cells that circulate in the body live for about three months before they die. When sugar (glucose) sticks to these red blood cells by binding to hemoglobin A1c, it gives us an idea of how much glucose has been around in the blood for the preceding three months. Hemoglobin A1c is a minor component of hemoglobin to which gl Continue reading >>

What Are The Normal A1c Levels For Children?

What Are The Normal A1c Levels For Children?

The A1c blood test is one of the laboratory tests used to diagnose diabetes and an important measure of average blood sugar levels in someone who has diabetes. This test determines the amount of glucose or sugar that has attached to the blood's hemoglobin -- the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells -- during the 3-month lifespan of these cells. Target A1c levels have been established to help healthcare providers, as well as children with diabetes and their families, understand the blood sugar goals needed to reduce the risk of the long-term complications of diabetes. While there are some situations where the A1c result may not be reliable, as a rule this test is accurate and an essential part of a child's diabetes management program. Video of the Day Normal A1c Levels Diagnostic criteria for children is similar to the guidelines used in adults, and the A1c is one of the tests used to diagnose diabetes. A1c levels are reported as a percentage, and often the estimated average glucose (eAG) -- a number calculated from the A1c reading -- is also included with the results. Using the same units as a blood glucose meter, the eAG makes understanding the A1c result a bit easier by comparing the A1c to average blood sugar levels. A normal, nondiabetic A1c level is below 5.7 percent, which reflects an eAG below 117 mg/dL. The level used to diagnose diabetes is 6.5 percent and above, which reflects an eAG of 140 mg/dL or higher. A1c levels above normal but below the diabetes range fit into a prediabetes range. Target A1c Levels Along with its role in diagnosing diabetes, the A1c test is performed between 2 and 4 times per year to estimate average blood sugar levels over the previous 3 months. This test is used to monitor the effectiveness of diabetes treatment and to determin Continue reading >>

In Search Of: The Highest Diabetes A1c In History

In Search Of: The Highest Diabetes A1c In History

My most recent A1C was nothing to be proud of, but I consoled myself with the thought that it was hardly the worst in history. That got me wondering: What was the all-time worst A1C? Who holds this dubious record, and how high is it possible to go? I decided to pound the pavement and try to find out. So where to start when looking for a diabetes record? Well, with the Guinness Book of World Records, of course. But oddly, the Guinness people don’t seem to have any listings related to A1Cs. They do, however, report that Michael Patrick Buonocore survived a blood sugar of 2,656 mg/dL upon admittance to the ER in East Stroudsburg, PA, on March 23, 2008. Michael was a T1 kiddo at the time, and that record-high sugar level was part of his diagnosis experience. So does Michael also hold the record for top A1C? No. Because while he’s living (thankfully) proof that stratospheric blood sugar levels are possible, a sky-scraping A1C requires both altitude and time. Remember that A1Cs provide a three-month average of our blood sugars. Individual high BG readings, even crazy-high ones, don’t alter the test as much as you’d think if they last only a short time. Because type 1 in kids Michael's age hit so quickly, I figured his A1C would have been rather middle of the road. It takes a slow burn to make an A1C boil. But just to be sure, I reached out to his parents, who tell me his A1C was 11.9 at diagnosis. Higher than I expected, but not too high given the four-digit BG reading. (If his 2,656 had been his average blood sugar for three months, his A1C would have been roughly 95! Yes, that’s 95.0, not 9.5). The highest A1C turns out to be a tricky piece of data to ferret out. If you try Google, you find a gazillion people talking about their own personal highest A1Cs, and comp Continue reading >>

Understanding Your A1c

Understanding Your A1c

The A1C is a blood test that helps determine if your diabetes management plan is working well. (Both Type 1 and Type 2 take this test.) It’s done every 2-3 months to find out what your average blood sugar has been. (You may also hear this test called glycosylated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c, and HbA1c.) A1c is the most common name for it though. How the test works Essentially, the test can tell how much sugar is in the blood stream by looking for proteins (hemoglobins). When glucose (sugar) enters the blood, it binds to the protein in the red blood cells. This binding creates “glycated hemoglobin”. The more sugar in the blood, the more glycated hemoglobin. It’s important to test your blood sugar levels (BGLs) throughout the day; however, an A1C test gives you a bigger picture with a long-term average of those blood sugar levels. What do these numbers mean? The A1c is an average of what your blood sugar levels have been over the 3-month period. In general, the higher your A1C number, the higher your likelihood of diabetes complications. (You don’t want a high A1C; it means there is too much sugar in your blood and your body isn’t absorbing it.) A1C number 4.6 – 6.0 Normal (does not have diabetes) 5.7 – 6.4 Pre-diabetes (warning that someone may develop Type 2 or have the beginning onset of Type 1) 6.7+ Diabetes (someone diagnosed with diabetes) <7.0 – 7.5 Target range (for adults diagnosed with diabetes – children diagnosed with diabetes) This target range varies between individuals, some people naturally run a little higher, some lower. It is important to note that especially in children a higher A1C (of 7.5) is recommended. The A1C number will help you and your doctor determine though if your diabetes management plan is working well. Continue reading >>

Translating A1c To A Blood Sugar Level

Translating A1c To A Blood Sugar Level

In the USA, doctors recommend that you have your Hemoglobin A1c measured at least twice per year. This simple blood test will tell you an approximation of your blood sugar control for the past 3 months based on the amount of Advanced Glycogenated End-Products (AGEs) that have accumulated in your blood. The higher your blood sugar levels are, the more AGEs are present. AGEs are also responsible for the development of complications such as retinopathy and neuropathy, because that accumulation will build and irritate crucial nerve-endings. Now, let’s get back to your A1C: To help people with diabetes understanding their A1C in real day-to-day terms, the medical world has developed the “eAG” measurement. Estimated Average Glucose. Your eAG will give your A1C reading in a blood sugar level of milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) just like you’re used to seeing on your glucose meter. The American Diabetes Association has this easy calculator, allowing you to enter and translate your latest A1C to your eAG. 12% = 298 mg/dL (240 – 347) 11% = 269 mg/dL (217 – 314) 10% = 240 mg/dL (193 – 282) 9% = 212 mg/dL (170 –249) 8% = 183 mg/dL (147 – 217) 7% = 154 mg/dL (123 – 185) 6% = 126 mg/dL (100 – 152) What can you do with that information? It is recommended that people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes achieve an A1C of 7.0 percent or lower for optimal health, and the prevention of complications. This translates to an average blood sugar before and between meals around 70 to 130 mg/dL. And after meals, under 180 mg/dL. For pregnancy with diabetes, an A1C lower than 6.5 percent is imperative for the healthy development of your baby, and your own health and safety. Post-meal blood sugars for pregnant women is suggested at lower than 120 mg/dL. A non-diabetic’s A1C is Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Testing In An Emergency Department

Hemoglobin A1c Testing In An Emergency Department

Hemoglobin A1c Testing in an Emergency Department Michelle F Magee , M.D1,2,3 and Carine Nassar , M.S., R.D., C.D.E1,2 1MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, Maryland 2MedStar Diabetes Institute, Washington, District of Columbia 3Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia 1MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, Maryland 2MedStar Diabetes Institute, Washington, District of Columbia 1MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, Maryland 2MedStar Diabetes Institute, Washington, District of Columbia 3Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia Corresponding Author: Michelle Magee, M.D., MedStar Health Research and Diabetes Institutes, 100 Irving Street, NW, EB 4114, Washington DC 20010; email address [email protected] Copyright 2011 Diabetes Technology Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Emergency department (ED) visits for hyperglycemia are common and costly. Enhanced strategies for recognizing and managing patients with diabetes in the ED are needed. Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) testing is typically used to assess level of glycemic control in the 23 months preceding an office visit. In this article, we report on potential roles for point-of-care (POC) A1C testing in the ED for patients presenting with uncontrolled hyperglycemia. We enrolled patients presenting to an urban tertiary care hospital ED with blood glucose (BG) 200 mg/dl who were otherwise stable for discharge (n = 86) in a prospective, nonrandomized pilot study. Antihyperglycemic medication management, survival-skills diabetes self-management education, and health system navigation were provided. Followup visits took place at 2472 hours and at 2 and 4 weeks. Point-of-care A1C testing was performed Continue reading >>

A1c Test

A1c Test

Print Overview The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well you're managing your diabetes. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications. Why it's done An international committee of experts from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the International Diabetes Federation, recommend that the A1C test be the primary test used to diagnose prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. After a diabetes diagnosis, the A1C test is used to monitor your diabetes treatment plan. Since the A1C test measures your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months instead of your blood sugar level at a specific point in time, it is a better reflection of how well your diabetes treatment plan is working overall. Your doctor will likely use the A1C test when you're first diagnosed with diabetes. This also helps establish a baseline A1C level. The test may then need to be repeated while you're learning to control your blood sugar. Later, how often you need the A1C test depends on the type of diabetes you have, your treatment plan and how well you're managing your blood sugar. For example, the A1C test may be recommended: Once every year if you have prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes Twice a year if Continue reading >>

More in diabetes