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A1c Home Test Reviews

At Home A1c Testing Systems & Kits: Review

At Home A1c Testing Systems & Kits: Review

The A1C, a Glycated hemoglobin, is a form of hemoglobin that is measured primarily to identify the three-month average blood glucose concentration. The A1C test is limited to a three-month average because the lifespan of a red blood cell is only four months. In other words, it’s the indication of your blood sugar level for a three-month period. Typically, your doctor will test your A1C levels every 90 to 180 days depending on how well your blood sugar levels have been managed. In basic terms, the A1C test checks to see how much glucose is attaching to your red blood cells. You can work to keep your A1C within your target range using a recommended diabetes management regimen along with a well-managed diet, exercise routine and other healthy lifestyle . Normal a1C Prediabetes a1C Diabetic a1c Under 5.7 5.7 to 6.4 6.5 and above A1C Test Features and Pricing While most hospital conducted A1C tests cost around $86 per test (depending on your co-pay), you can now buy the A1C self-check home kit for around $40. Each kit includes one test with two strips, but you can buy a double test kit as well. The kits are not reusable so once you use your two lancets, you must buy another kit. Use Most people use this test every 30 days instead of waiting 90 days to be seen by the doctor. This helps patients have a more accurate reading on where their levels fall throughout the month. Insurance Coverage Most insurances will cover 1 or 2 tests per year and some hospitals will have a sample take-home A1C test that you can ask for. However, not all hospitals do so you may still need to buy over the counter kits depending on how many results a year you want to have or how many your doctor requires. Pros and Cons of Home Testing The A1C at home kit needs four large drops of blood which is eas Continue reading >>

{diabetes Management} Home A1c Test Fail

{diabetes Management} Home A1c Test Fail

I’ve been curious about the home A1c tests. We have an A1c done in office every three to four months, but sometimes I wish I could check in between to see if changes we’ve made are making any difference. (And, yes I know the A1c is only one measurement of how well diabetes is being managed.) I saw the Bayer A1cNow Selfcheck kits on sale and decided that it was worth it to buy a box and check it out. That evening I pulled it out and did the test and was absolutely SHOCKED at the number that popped up. There is NO WAY that Q’s A1c was 10.5. That would indicate an average BG of 255. I don’t think so! So not only was I totally upset and discouraged, but I was perplexed. I wrote it off as inaccurate and decided to wait until our next endo appointment and use the second test in the box to compare. In the meantime I saw two other bloggers use the home kit and they each seemed to think that the test was accurate enough. Our next endo appointment rolled around. I have been struggling with Q’s A1c’s (both literally and emotionally) because they are higher than I would like them to be and we made some changes in the past couple of months that we really thought would bring it down. In fact her A1c dropped 0.5, a much appreciated improvement. We still have a little way to go, but we made a couple more changes to I:C ratios and correction factors that I think will help. We also talked about doing the iPro again. (Unfortunately this clinic requires three separate visits: putting it on, taking it off, and discussing results with the doctor in person. It’s 90 minutes each way for us.) Armed with an A1c taken in the endo’s office (finger prick, not blood draw), I pulled out the home A1c test to check it’s accuracy. It was 1.8 HIGHER than the result at the endo. FAIL. I Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Blog

Type 1 Diabetes Blog

I'm a big fan of having my A1C done every 3 to 5 months with my doctor. For me, it's my report card of how I'm doing managing my blood sugars, and it gives me a chance to course correct if needed, before too much time has gone on. Throughout the last ten years, I've had an average A1C in the mid-6%'s. That's a number that feels good to me, personally. With the challenge of managing my blood sugars while traveling for a year, I know my A1C has gone up. I had the lab test done in June, when I was back in the US for a friend's wedding, and saw a number in the mid-7%'s that I was not thrilled with. Thoughout the last three months in Africa, I've been much more diligent to keep my number down through pre-bolusing and accurate carb counting. I'm now in a place where I'd like to see how much progress I've made. My meter averages tell me I'm close to a 7% A1C, but I'd really like to see the weighted average of an A1C. I feel like the meter doesn't account for how much time I spent at 106 or 198 mg/dl; it just simply averages each blood test. With that in mind, I've asked my younger brother to bring me a home A1C test when I meet him in Spain in a few weeks. I figured this is the closest I'll get to getting a real-deal test done. I've done a lot of googling about the accuracy of these tests. Beyond many opinion pieces, the only study I've seen is here, and says that 93.2% of study paticipants had a home A1C results wihtin the acceptable range of ±13.5% of the laboratory reference value. To me, 13.5% is a fairly close range. But I'm curious if anyone has had experience with these home A1C tests? And if you think ±13.5% is truly accurate? Continue reading >>

Do-it-yourself Health Screening Tests That Are Worth The Money

Do-it-yourself Health Screening Tests That Are Worth The Money

Medicine’s future or a bad idea? Sales of do-it-yourself health screening tests are expected to increase by more than 31 percent from 2012 to 2017, to more than $24.2 billion worldwide, according to BCC Research. Many kits require a drop of blood, a swab of saliva, or a urine or stool sample. Some give results in a few minutes; others require you send a sample to a lab in a postage-paid envelope, and they might take a few days. But not everyone thinks the tests are a good option. “I want engaged patients, and I want them to be well-informed,” says Steven Nissen, M.D., chairman of the department of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. “But self-diagnosis has very important risks. Tests can be wrong. They can give false reassurance or cause excessive alarm.” In fact, Nissen says he doesn’t understand why the Food and Drug Administration allows them to be sold. Others see the growth of this trend as inevitable—and largely positive. “This is the future of medicine,” says Eric Topol, M.D., a cardiologist and director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla, Calif. “People want to be more in charge of their own health care.” If you decide to try home tests, be sure to take several precautions. For example, you should show the results to a doctor, who can confirm them and recommend treatment, if necessary. And choose those tests carefully. Most of the self-test kits on store shelves are authorized by the FDA, says Courtney Lias, Ph.D., director of its Division of Chemistry and Toxicology Devices. That means the agency has reviewed test data from the manufacturers to make sure that the kits are easy to use and that people can get results by following the directions. But the FDA doesn’t guarantee that the readings Continue reading >>

A1c Test Kit

A1c Test Kit

The AccuBase A1c Test Kit is a non-fasting, finger stick, whole blood mail-in test. It is considered a very accurate and comprehensive. This is not a Dried Blood Spot (DBS) test. DBS mail-in tests are know to have temperature, humidity and application problems. The AccuBase test is considered sensitive and specific enough to detect or screen for diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that A1c samples be screened for abnormal hemoglobins as part of the screening and/or diagnosing process. The AccuBase A1c Test is the only A1c test that screens for abnormal hemoglobins using HPLC-IE. Abnormal hemoglobins are know to cause interferences in A1c testing. DBS mail-in A1c tests are incapable of detecting abnormal hemoglobins. DTIL has participated in the College of American Pathology (CAP) GH2 surveys for over 15 years. The AccuBase A1c Test Kit does not require any drying time, samples can be collected and mailed within minutes. The kit comes complete with positive patient ID, EDTA sample vial (preserves the sample) and capillary tube device for ease of accurate sample collection. Our analytical method uses the Bio-Rad D-10 method which is approved for diabetes screening and is NGSP certified. Samples are stable for 21 day un-refrigerated once collected. Each test result comes with an estimated Average Glucose (eAG) calculation based on the DCCT Equation: % A1c X 28.7 - 46.7 = eAG in mg/dl. Test results are typically available within 5 to 7 days form mailing. Rapid turnaround can be arranged to provide, next-day, second-day or three day results. Ideal for confidential diabetes screening, DTIL also provides kits that are 100% HIPAA compliant for outreach programs and clinical trails. Kits are available in either English or Spanish and can be private label Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of An Over-the-counter Glycated Hemoglobin (a1c) Test Kit

Evaluation Of An Over-the-counter Glycated Hemoglobin (a1c) Test Kit

Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) monitoring is an integral component of diabetes management. This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the A1CNow® SELFCHECK device when used by lay users and health care professionals (HCPs) to measure A1C. Subjects performed two A1CNow SELFCHECK finger-stick self-tests followed by a finger-stick test of the subject’s blood by a HCP. The primary endpoint assessed accuracy of the subject and HCP A1CNow SELFCHECK readings. Secondary endpoints included precision, comprehension of instructional material (written material ± DVD), and product satisfaction. For accuracy comparison, a venous blood sample was drawn from each subject and tested by laboratory (TOSOH) analysis. Subject comprehension of product instructional material was evaluated via first-time failure (FTF) rate as recorded by the HCP, and subject satisfaction was assessed through written survey. A total of 110 subjects with (n = 93) and without (n = 17) diabetes participated. Of 177 subject A1C values, 165 (93.2%) were within the acceptable range of ±13.5% of the laboratory reference value and considered accurate. Regression analysis showed good correlation of subject values to laboratory and HCP results (R2 = 0.93 for both). The average within-subject coefficient of variation was 4.57% (n = 74). The FTF rates with and without instructional DVD were 11.3% (n = 56) and 39.6% (n = 54), respectively. Subjects with diabetes/prediabetes overwhelmingly indicated that they were “very” to “extremely” likely (93.5%) to discuss their home A1C results with their HCP. Lay users found the A1CNow SELFCHECK easy to use, and both lay users and HCPs were able to measure A1C accurately. Keywords: A1CNow, diabetes, glycated hemoglobin A1c, in vitro diagnostic for home use, over-t Continue reading >>

Can You Pass This Test?

Can You Pass This Test?

A1c Testing Alternative test names: A1c with eAG, HA1c, Hgb A1c, Hemoglobin A1c [1] I’m assuming your doctor has ordered an A1c test for you more than once since being diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. I hope you are clear as to why. I also hope you understand how to use your test results to improve your health, if not, I hope this helps to guide you through your journey to improvement. Insulin resistance begets increased blood sugar levels. It can lead to your pancreas creating inadequate amounts of insulin. An A1c test can provide information on how you are managing your glucose levels over time. An A1c glucose level less than 5.7 percent is considered in normal range. Between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes. A common target, for those previously diagnosed with diabetes, is an A1C level of 7 percent or less. [2] Of course, any higher level reflects ill-managed diabetes. So what does this mean for you? To start, hemoglobin is the red blood protein which transports oxygen. The A1c test indicates the percent of glycation – sugar attaching to blood proteins, which is reported as a percentage. The test measures the percent of glucose over a two to three-month period. [3] Over time, elevated blood sugar levels inhibit a healthy metabolism impacting organs. But that’s not the end of it. It is possible that your glucose levels can be somewhat erratic or like a roller coaster ride – extreme highs and lows. Because this test is an ‘average’, it may be possible to achieve a near optimal A1c with improperly managed glucose. Regular glucose testing is important to know whether your A1c result is an accurate representation of your glucose control. Regular testing is not only testing your fasting glucose but before and two hours after meals. When is Continue reading >>

Selecting An A1c Point-of-care Instrument

Selecting An A1c Point-of-care Instrument

A1C point-of-care (POC) instruments benefit patients with diabetes by facilitating clinician decision making that results in significant glycemic improvements. Three National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP)–certified POC products are available in the United States: the handheld A1CNow (formerly manufactured by Bayer Diabetes Care but now made by Chek Diagnostics) and two bench-top models called the Axis-Shield Afinion Analyzer and the Siemens DCA Vantage. This article compares the three available NGSP-certified POC products in terms of accuracy, precision, ease of use, cost, and additional features. Its goal is to aid health care facilities in conveniently identifying the A1C POC product that best meets their needs. It additionally reviews evidence that supports the continued use of A1C POC instruments in the clinical arena. The ability of a POC instrument to most closely replicate the actual A1C of any given patient is paramount (12). Since its development in 1996 under the direction of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the NGSP has been the authority in establishing guidelines and protocols for standardizing A1C testing for both POC and laboratory instruments to Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)-equivalent values (7,13). The DCCT, a primary-prevention cohort study, established the direct relationship between A1C and long-term complication risk in patients with type 1 diabetes (14). To ensure continued accuracy, the NGSP requires annual manufacturer certification, during which the A1C assay device must be tested in a 40-sample comparison against an NGSP secondary reference laboratory in a controlled environment. The 40 individual samples are distributed over an A1C range of 4–10%. Certification results when at least 37 of Continue reading >>

Top 10 Best Diabetes Testing Kit In 2018 Reviews

Top 10 Best Diabetes Testing Kit In 2018 Reviews

Taking good care of your health not only means that you have to eat well and exercise regularly, but it also means that you have to perform medical checkups every once in a while. However, going to the doctor and setting up an appointment is often an inconveniencing task. Therefore, a good suggestion for you would be to invest in DIY solutions such as the best diabetes testing kits. These machines are simple to use and with fully functional designs that make them perfect for diabetes monitoring. Some of the top testing kits for you to consider include: 10. Bayer Contour Diabetes Blood Glucose Testing Kit Improve your overall health regime with the Bayer Contour Diabetes testing kit.It comes with as many as 100 contour test strips, painless design lancets, bayer control solution and it’s also simple to use as well. It is easy and simple to use which makes it ideal for convenient setup. This unit will provide fast and accurate results, with just a small blood sample. The entire kit also has a fresh and long expiration date that averages at 12 months. 9. NEW MULTISURE KETONES AND BLOOD SUGAR MONITOR. Monitoring your health is sometimes not a simple task. This is why the new multisite ketones and blood sugar monitor is the perfect solution for your needs. This ketones and blood sugar monitor is powerful enough to meet your unique blood regulations needs. The entire set if available with a various component for convenient blood measuring benefits. It is simple to set up, and it comes with several kits and components for well-balanced blood measurement results. 8. Genultimate Diabetes Testing Kit Take good care of your health by considering the benefits of using the Genultimate Testing kit, which comes with everything that you need to test your glucose levels. For instance, Continue reading >>

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

These 10 meters varied in age and wear.Some were old, some were new one wasmy own personalmeter that I used to calibrate my CGM and make mission-criticaldecisions each day.All of them passed their respective control solution tests, so its safe to assume that they werein good working order. I tried to match the testing method employed by Chris (author of the original post ) as closely as possible. Eightrounds of testing were performed over the course of 24 hours according to the following procedure: Order of meters was randomized for each round. Tests were performed only when CGM readings were stable (i.e. no insulin on board and CGM showing a slope of ~0 mg/dL/min). I didnt do anything special to stabilize my blood glucose just tested as I went about a normal day. The test strips used for each meter all came from their own unique vials. Before and after completing the eight testing rounds, the meters were checked using their respective control solutions. They all passed the control solution tests. Unlike Chris, I didnt have an alarming spread in my results for any round. The overallbetween-meter variability (% Error, or %CV for you stats folks) was only 6%. In plain English:My treatment decisions wouldnt have varied much at all, regardless of the meter I was using. One unit of rapid-acting insulin brings my BG down by ~80 mg/dL, and I correct whenever Im over 100 mg/dL. Ill usually correct down to 70-110 mg/dL, depending on my plans for the next couplehours (big meal = correct to 70; workout = correct to 110). Iwasrelieved to see that even if I tooka correction bolus for the maximum BG of each round, I still would have been brought down to a desirableblood glucose level. For example, take Round 1. The highest reading I saw was 182 md/dL, and Id take 1 unit for that. Ev Continue reading >>

Post-holiday A1c Update And New Diabetes Management Plan

Post-holiday A1c Update And New Diabetes Management Plan

Post-Holiday A1c Update and New Diabetes Management Plan As I mentioned in this post , I had a hard time keeping my fasting blood sugar in range over the holidays. I eventually discovered that I had been eating dairy unknowingly. I was snacking on York Peppermint Patties and chocolate covered acai berries (in small amounts so the carbohydrate amount wouldnt affect my blood glucose too much). In my effort to be like my Grandma, having candy dishes all over during the holidays, I accidentally sabotaged my gut. Oops. Theres no need to cry over spilt milk. Now that I know where those higher than usual numbers are coming from, Im back on the dairy-free wagon! I am still working to keep my lifestyle and diet in line so I can keep my pancreas alive and live a full, healthy life. I was curious/concerned how these higher than normal blood glucose levels would affect my A1c. I was eating those dairy candies for about 8 weeks before I discovered the issue. The A1c tests 2-3 months prior to the test. So I messed up pretty much the entire time frame! My quarterly check-up with the endocrinologist was Monday, January 29. The office tests my A1c levels every 3 months and uses that along with daily blood glucose checks to make sure my type 1 diabetes stays in check. Since my diabetes management plan is so different than most, I wanted to test the accuracy of the home A1c test and come up with a new diabetes management plan. I decided to try one of the home A1c kits from Walgreens before this visit. I wanted to test the accuracy of the home kit against the doctors office. In my revised diabetes management plan, Im hoping to stretch out my office visits, and in order to do that I need an accurate way to check my A1c. After reading many reviews on many brands of home A1c test kits, I was Continue reading >>

Hba1c Test Accuracy

Hba1c Test Accuracy

If you’ve had diabetes for a while, chances are you’ve become familiar with the HbA1c test — a measure of long-term blood glucose control. Your doctor will most likely order this test at your regular appointments, since it’s considered the most reliable indicator of blood glucose control over the previous 2–3 months. According to current guidelines from the American Diabetes Association, most people should aim for an HbA1c level of 7% or lower — and possibly even lower than that, if your doctor thinks it’s a good idea. But the HbA1c test isn’t perfect. One potential pitfall of the test is that while it gives a snapshot of average blood glucose levels, it doesn’t account for blood glucose variability. For example, a person with an average blood glucose level of 120 mg/dl could have glucose levels that are close to that level all of the time, or a glucose level of 140 mg/dl for 75% of the time and 60 mg/dl for 25% of the time. Clearly, the first scenario is much better, since it represents a much lower risk of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). But two people in these different situations would most likely have nearly the same HbA1c level. Another potential problem with the HbA1c test has come to light only recently. Last month, researchers at Harvard Medical School announced — in a study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine — that based on their findings, the accuracy of the HbA1c test in reflecting average blood glucose levels depends on the age of a person’s red blood cells. The HbA1c test measures the extent to which glucose has become attached to a protein in red blood cells, so if a person has red blood cells that live slightly longer than another person’s, that person will have a higher HbA1c level even if both of them ha Continue reading >>

Easy And Accurate Diabetes Monitoring At Home Is Available

Easy And Accurate Diabetes Monitoring At Home Is Available

The A1CNow device is the easiest and most accurate way for those of us who have diabetes to check our key blood glucose level at home. But it still has spotty availability. Chex Diagnostics, formerly known at Polymer Technology Systems, started shipping it six months ago after the company had purchased the A1CNow business from Bayer Diabetes Care last year. But many pharmacies don’t have it yet. The good news, however, is that we can get it for less than ever before. The pharmacist at the local Kroger supermarket told me today that he had never heard of a way to check our A1C at home. A pharmacist at the most upscale pharmacy near me remembered that they had sold the A1C test when Bayer made it but didn’t have any record of the Chex Diagnostics or Polymer Systems Technology device. I couldn’t find it on the Rite Aid, Target, or Costco websites. But Chex Diagnostics provides the A1CNow device to two retailers who sell it as house brands. Chex Diagnostics owns the proprietary names under which Walgreens sells as the “Walgreens At-Home A1C Test Kit” and which Wal-Mart sells as the “ReliOn Fast A1C Test.” You can get the two tests in the Walgreens At Home A1C Kit for $32.99, according to the company website. At least I think that’s the price, because much of the “overview” information is wrong. Besides describing what is obviously a blood glucose meter, it refers to a “lover limit of the A1C target.” Don’t you love it! The situation at Wal-Mart stores is much better, although its website hasn’t caught up. It’s not yet on the Wal-Mart website, which shows the Bayer version at $29.88 but as no longer available. But Wal-Mart stores started getting their ReliOn Fast A1C Test kits from Chex Diagnostics about two weeks ago, Chex’s Director of Marke Continue reading >>

Study: A1c Now Test Is Crap And So Are Many Doctor Office A1c Tests

Study: A1c Now Test Is Crap And So Are Many Doctor Office A1c Tests

A study published in the January issue of the journal, Clinical Chemistry put eight brands of A1c test kits, including the A1c Now test sold in pharmacies and online, through rigorous testing. The other kits were the ones marketed to doctors for use in their offices. You can read an abstract of this study here: Six of Eight Hemoglobin A1c Point-of-Care Instruments Do Not Meet the General Accepted Analytical Performance Criteria. Erna Lenters-Westra1, and Robbert J. Slingerland. Clinical Chemistry 56: 44-52, 2010. First published November 19, 2009; 10.1373/clinchem.2009.130641 The study concluded only two of the eight kits produced clinically valid results. What is most telling, though, is that the study reports: Because of disappointing EP-10 results, 2 of the 8 manufacturers decided not to continue the evaluation. Their test kits were removed from the study after they completed only one of three CLSI protocols that were planned. CLSI stands for "Clinical and Lab Standards Institute." Since four of the six kits that remained in the study ended up with unacceptable results, but must have had good enough results after the first protocol to encourage their manufacturers to keep them in the study, one can only conclude that the kits removed from the study did abysmally. Which meters were withdrawn from the study after they did very poorly at the first level of testing? A1c Now and Quo-test. Of the six remaining kits that completed all three laboratory test protocols, Only the Afinion and the DCA Vantage met the acceptance criteria of having a total CV <3% in the clinically relevant range. The CV is the "Coeeficient of variation." It is the statistic that represents the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean. It's a measure of how widely scattered data is. The larger it Continue reading >>

Relion Fasta1c Test At-home A1c System

Relion Fasta1c Test At-home A1c System

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Re:ReliOn FastA1C Test At-Home A1C System Are there very many people here that are usinga home system for testing A1c monthly? I just read through a pound of reviews at Walmart and this ReliOn Fast system seems very iffy to me. But then some complained about the product expiration datebeing expired. So that could be a bummer. Many complaints were about the results not being accurate. I sure do like the idea of home testing every month. And although I'm not keen on doing lab through doctors' orders, I know it's essential for maintenance. My personal experience with the Relion A1c tests has been... Yes, check the expiration date on the box. I have picked up one that expired but it was just 15 days over so I used it anyway. The testing I have done seems to closely agree with the tests my doctor gives me. They are usually within .2 difference. The A1C test is subject to a .5 error in either direction so a 5 could be anywhere from 4.5 to 5.5 My goal is to get an indication as to how well I am managing my diabetes and I pay more attention to trends from month to month rather than get too hung up on 1 particular test (similar to the morning fasting readings). It has taken time but I have learned to not get too hung up on individual readings. Diabetes has many mental components and one of the largest ones is that it is the long game that has to be played and the trends are much more significant that any short term readings. For example - Thanksgiving I had a traditional dinner with stuffing, some bread, corn, and mashed potatoes (all no no's). The only good thing on that plate was the turkey. I am su Continue reading >>

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