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A1c 9.3

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

A1c Goes From 6.4 To 9.3 In Three Months

A1c Goes From 6.4 To 9.3 In Three Months

After working hard to get my blood sugar under control using diet, exercise, metformin and glyburide my A1c was at 6.4, down from 7.9. I thought that was excellent and maybe I could cut back a bit on the exercising. Instead my doctor cut my metformin in half, took me off glyburide and put me on Victoza. After 3 months my A1c shot up to 9.3, now I have terrible dry mouth and because of the high blood sugar there is frequent urination. My main exercise was walking but that is very hard now because of the frequent urination. About the only benefit I see in the Victoza is loss of appetite and maybe I lost 2-3 pounds. I am now thinking of getting a new doctor and telling them the prescription I want D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 Quickly, ASAP. rapidily. Fire your current Doctor he is unbelievably incompetent. Metformin = safe drug with possible anti-cancer properties. Victoza = abnormal pancreatic cell growth. Also you may need to be on insulin because you could be a type 1 or a type 2 with very reduced insulin production. "Victoza = abnormal pancreatic cell growth" OMG! Then why are they still allowed to prescribe it? More information to try and remember so my health care giver doesn't kill me. Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy I don't know where you live, but can you discuss this further with your current doctor and tell them you do not agree with your current treatment and you want to go back to the previous treatment. Maybe even a variation of previous treatment and only use, diet, exercise, and Met.? D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 "Victoza = abnormal pancreatic cell growth" OMG! Then why are they still allowed to prescribe it? More information to try and remember so my health care giver doesn't kill me. Abnorm Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c definition and facts Hemoglobin A1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells that sugar molecules stick to, usually for the life of the red blood cell (about three months). The higher the level of glucose in the blood, the higher the level of hemoglobin A1c is detectable on red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1c levels correlate with average levels of glucose in the blood over an approximately three-month time period. Normal ranges for hemoglobin A1c in people without diabetes is about 4% to 5.9%. People with diabetes with poor glucose control have hemoglobin A1c levels above 7%. Hemoglobin A1c levels are routinely used to determine blood sugar control over time in people with diabetes. Decreasing hemoglobin A1c levels by 1% may decrease the risk of microvascular complications (for example, diabetic eye, nerve, or kidney disease) by 10%. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be checked, according to the American Diabetic Association, every six months in individuals with stable blood sugar control, and every three months if the person is trying to establish stable blood sugar control. Hemoglobin A1c has many other names such as glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and HbA1c. To explain what hemoglobin A1c is, think in simple terms. Sugar sticks to things, and when it has been stuck to something for a long time it's harder to the get sugar (glucose) off. In the body, sugar sticks too, particularly to proteins. The red blood cells that circulate in the body live for about three months before they die. When sugar (glucose) sticks to these red blood cells by binding to hemoglobin A1c, it gives us an idea of how much glucose has been around in the blood for the preceding three months. Hemoglobin A1c is a minor component of hemoglobin to which gl Continue reading >>

Voice Of The Diabetic

Voice Of The Diabetic

A Wake-Up Call From the Editor: Marilyn Brandt Smith lives in Louisville, Kentucky, with her husband Roger and their son Jay. The Smiths are retired teachers, and Marilyn is also a freelance writer and editor. My husband's talking watch announced that it was 6:00 p.m. when the phone rang. Thanks to his audio caller ID, he knew instantly who was calling that April evening. But the doctor's office should have been closed. Did surgeons work this late? "You have to get your blood glucose down, or we aren't doing your surgery next week," said the voice on the other end of the line. My fifty-six-year-old husband Roger had been suffering from infections, headaches, congestion, and pain, and, when he went to the doctor to investigate the cause, they found a tooth fragment lodged in his sinus cavity, the result of a routine tooth extraction last summer. Since Roger was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at age forty-eight, he had been managing with oral medication, improved diet, and increased exercise. He lost fifty pounds, and, although his A1C has crept up in recent years, he thought he was in reasonably good control. Then the surgeon called to report a blood glucose level of 270 mg/dl, more than double what a fasting glucose should be. Something had to change and fast. Diabetes runs in Roger's family, and he has always known he might someday need to go on insulin. Although Splenda and other sugar-free goodies appear regularly on our grocery list, his diet is not as good as it should be. He was, and still is, a great fan of the all-you-can-eat buffet. The morning after that disappointing phone call, we went to see our family doctor, and Roger got an A1C test. The result left everyone speechless: His A1C was 9.3 percent--far too high. Our doctor knew that Roger would prefer to avo Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your A1c For Diabetes Control

How To Lower Your A1c For Diabetes Control

Do you know what the AIC test measures? Learn about this blood test and get tips to help lower A1C and manage diabetes over time. The A1C test is an essential part of living well with type 2 diabetes: This simple blood test to measure hemoglobin A1C, or HbA1C, provides information about your blood sugar control over the previous few months. The results are like a grade for how well you've been managing diabetes. By making the most of your daily efforts, you can lower your A1C results and take pride in all of your hard work. A1C 101 Unlike blood glucose monitoring, which you do at home yourself at frequent intervals, A1C levels are measured periodically by your doctor or a nurse in a medical office. During this test, a health care worker will use a needle to draw a blood sample from a vein in your arm, or by pricking the tip of your finger with a small lancet. The sample is then sent to a medical laboratory for analysis. The A1C test lets your doctor know about your average level of blood sugar control for the past three months. It looks at the way glucose has attached to hemoglobin, a component of red blood cells. Red blood cells live for about three months, which is how the A1C test can provide this overview. The results of the test are given as a percentage. Normal A1C is below 5.7 percent, and the results of the test are accurate within 0.5 percent. In general, the goal of blood sugar control is a result below a 7 percent A1C because the risk for diabetes complications is lower below that point. But that number isn't realistic for everyone with diabetes, so your doctor might recommend a different target for you. Understanding Blood Sugar Control “I explain that a blood sugar test gives a snapshot, and A1C is the whole motion picture,” says Joyce Malaskovitz, RN, Continue reading >>

How To Reduce A1c

How To Reduce A1c

Do you visit websites looking for information only to find a whole lot of rubbish and not much practical information? For example, when I decided to write this post I searched the web for ‘How to lower a1c' and I found articles like this that give you 10 pages of seemingly useless information. For starters those sites where you have to click to the next page to read one paragragh really annoy me. And if I read that post I'd be even more confused! So our goal here at Diabetes Meal Plans is to cut through the crap and confusion and give you practical strategies that REALLY get results. So let's tackle today's reader question: My A1c is high and I need help or suggestions to lower it. I'm feeling so frustrated, please help?! In this post I am going to cover how to reduce a1c but just remember if you have a question, you can submit it over here and we'll answer it in a post. What is A1c? I covered this in detail in another post over here. But the short of it is that A1c is a blood test that is done to reflect your average blood sugar levels over the past 2-3 months. The thing to understand here is what is raising the A1c level, it's sugar/ carbohydrates! A process called glycosylation occurs where sugars (glucose) in your blood stream attach to hemoglobin. The average red blood cell lives for around 3 months, so when they are doing the a1c blood test they are testing glycated hemoglobin. What's affecting this result the most? Sugar/ carbohydrate intake…so that's where you need to start. How To Lower A1c? Essentially you lower your a1c the same as you lower your blood glucose, through diet, exercise, and lifestyle. Cut the carbs If it's sugar/ carbs that influence a1c the most, then it makes sense to cut the carbs, right? So one of the best ways to lower a1c is to cut ba Continue reading >>

The A1c Test And Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

The A1c Test And Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice or diagnosis from a physician. In the United States, about 1 in 10 people have diabetes, a disease that affects the way the body produces or uses insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate glucose (sugar) in the blood. When blood sugar levels get too high, health problems can develop, including kidney problems. In fact, about half of all people diagnosed with diabetes will develop kidney disease. Persistently high sugar levels can damage the small blood vessels in the body. In the kidneys, diabetes can also cause damage to the tiny filters called glomeruli that filter the blood. The result is that your kidneys may begin to leak protein into the urine, and can become unable to properly eliminate the water, salt and waste products from your body. Another complication of diabetes is nerve damage, often causing burning and numbness in the feet. However, it can sometimes also lead to trouble emptying the bladder. Pressure from a full bladder that doesn’t empty properly can further damage the kidneys. What is the A1C test? The A1C, or hemoglobin A1C test, is used to measure long-term blood glucose levels. It is typically given every three to six months to people with diabetes. This laboratory test shows the person’s average blood glucose control for the previous two to three months. It differs from the finger stick blood test that is used daily to monitor current blood sugar levels. For someone with diabetes, the goal is to have an A1C reading of less than 7.0 percent. For someone who is not diabetic, a normal A1C level is 4.0 percent to 5.9 percent. Research has shown that when A1C levels are close to normal, the risk for complications of diabetes Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c, often abbreviated HbA1c, is a form of hemoglobin (a blood pigment that carries oxygen) that is bound to glucose. The blood test for HbA1c level is routinely performed in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Blood HbA1c levels are reflective of how well diabetes is controlled. The normal range for level for hemoglobin A1c is less than 6%. HbA1c also is known as glycosylated, or glycated hemoglobin. HbA1c levels are reflective of blood glucose levels over the past six to eight weeks and do not reflect daily ups and downs of blood glucose. High HbA1c levels indicate poorer control of diabetes than levels in the normal range. HbA1c is typically measured to determine how well a type 1 or type 2 diabetes treatment plan (including medications, exercise, or dietary changes) is working. How Is Hemoglobin A1c Measured? The test for hemoglobin A1c depends on the chemical (electrical) charge on the molecule of HbA1c, which differs from the charges on the other components of hemoglobin. The molecule of HbA1c also differs in size from the other components. HbA1c may be separated by charge and size from the other hemoglobin A components in blood by a procedure called high pressure (or performance) liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC separates mixtures (for example, blood) into its various components by adding the mixtures to special liquids and passing them under pressure through columns filled with a material that separates the mixture into its different component molecules. HbA1c testing is done on a blood sample. Because HbA1c is not affected by short-term fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations, for example, due to meals, blood can be drawn for HbA1c testing without regard to when food was eaten. Fasting for the blood test is not necessary. What Are Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Testing In An Emergency Department

Hemoglobin A1c Testing In An Emergency Department

Hemoglobin A1c Testing in an Emergency Department Michelle F Magee , M.D1,2,3 and Carine Nassar , M.S., R.D., C.D.E1,2 1MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, Maryland 2MedStar Diabetes Institute, Washington, District of Columbia 3Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia 1MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, Maryland 2MedStar Diabetes Institute, Washington, District of Columbia 1MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, Maryland 2MedStar Diabetes Institute, Washington, District of Columbia 3Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia Corresponding Author: Michelle Magee, M.D., MedStar Health Research and Diabetes Institutes, 100 Irving Street, NW, EB 4114, Washington DC 20010; email address [email protected] Copyright 2011 Diabetes Technology Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Emergency department (ED) visits for hyperglycemia are common and costly. Enhanced strategies for recognizing and managing patients with diabetes in the ED are needed. Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) testing is typically used to assess level of glycemic control in the 23 months preceding an office visit. In this article, we report on potential roles for point-of-care (POC) A1C testing in the ED for patients presenting with uncontrolled hyperglycemia. We enrolled patients presenting to an urban tertiary care hospital ED with blood glucose (BG) 200 mg/dl who were otherwise stable for discharge (n = 86) in a prospective, nonrandomized pilot study. Antihyperglycemic medication management, survival-skills diabetes self-management education, and health system navigation were provided. Followup visits took place at 2472 hours and at 2 and 4 weeks. Point-of-care A1C testing was performed Continue reading >>

Confused | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Confused | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes 3 weeks ago. My result was 9.3 - is this very high? I had an infection at the time when I went to get my blood tests done.. could this have an affect on my test results? someone with t2 will be along soon to advise, no doubt (I'm a t1) but in the meantime: 9.3 is fairly high, although some of us are much higher at diagnosis (in the 20s or even 30s). A non diabetic would have a fasting blood sugar of roughly 4 to 6. Infections can make blood sugar rise, that's true, but in a non-diabetic the body would respond and keep it under control. So if you are wondering whether the diagnosis was correct, the infection wouldn't make a difference to that. I'm not sure I've explained that very well so please say if you'd like me to have another go! Depends on what type of blood test you had. Was it a fasting blood test or an HbA1c test? You need to know I think and it's easy for them to tell you. 9.2 is quite high for an HbA1c although I've heard of much higher, but not particularly high for a first fasting blood test when you haven't been taking steps to lower your blood sugar and deal with your diabetes. Snodgers right, you're still diabetic either way, but as you get used to dealing with it and talking to others on this forum, it will be useful to know what sort of test it was. Your BG level was high but with care and a good diet you can get it down. You need to get it down below 7 at least as that's when the risk of complications starts. I like Continue reading >>

The A1c Score: The A1c Score Is Well Within The Dental Hygiene Scope Of Practice

The A1c Score: The A1c Score Is Well Within The Dental Hygiene Scope Of Practice

The A1C score: The A1C score is well within the dental hygiene scope of practice It's not just a casual conversation. The A1C score is well within the dental hygiene scope of practice Knowing the diabetic patient's HbA1c (A1C) score is a critical part of the medical history questioning. Recently, I asked a diabetic patient about his last A1C score. He did not know offhand, but said he would follow up with his physician as he recently had the blood test. His doctor replied that requesting this information from a dental hygienist is "beyond the scope of their practice." The doctor was even reluctant to tell the patient what his score was. Relentless, this patient did get his score and brought it to our attention; it was normal. In terms of comanaging health, this experience shows we have a long way to go in integrating medical-dental relationships. It also shows that not all physicians know the scope of the dental hygiene practice. What's new in diabetes research, care, and prevention? ----------------------------------------- Regardless of this experience, it is important for the patient and the dental team to know each patient's diabetic stability. Evidence-based research shows the bidirectional effect periodontal disease has on diabetes and vice versa. A patient with a higher A1C score (suspect uncontrolled diabetes) may require specialized services, referrals for extractions, or more aggressive periodontal treatment, for example, due to this higher risk factor. This article will explore the bidirectional effects between periodontal disease and diabetes, what an A1C score actually measures, why it is important for dental hygienists to know the A1C score, and how we can empower our patients to better manage their oral health and diabetes. The A1C score is a simple bloo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Numbers [archive] - Straight Dope Message Board

Diabetes Numbers [archive] - Straight Dope Message Board

Obesity can certainly be a factor in causing diabetes, but it's not the only thing involved. You can be quite thin and still have diabetes. Your blood cells have insulin receptors on them. When you get overweight, the fat can clog up those insulin receptors. Your blood sugar rises and the insulin producing cells in your pancreas get overworked trying to compensate for it. You end up being insulin deficient, which is basically type II diabetes. You could also be insulin deficient just to start with (type I diabetes). There are a lot of things that cause this, but you don't have to be overweight. A lot of people are just born with type I diabetes and are diagnosed with it as a child. (ETA) You could also just have defective insulin receptors. Some people are genetically disposed to have fewer working insulin receptors, which makes them naturally insulin resistant. Depending on how poorly their insulin receptors work, they could be diabetic naturally or could just be much more prone to diabetes caused by fat clogging up their fewer insulin receptors, Even if your diabetes was caused by being overweight, all that stress on the insulin producing cells in your pancreas can destroy some of those cells. When that happens, even after you lose weight and stop the fat from blocking the insulin receptors in your blood cells, your pancreas can still end up not being able to produce enough insulin. The insulin producing cells in your pancreas do not regenerate. Once they are gone, they are gone for good. So even if you weren't born with diabetes and only contracted it by being overweight, you can end up with permanent damage and be on insulin shots for the rest of your life. If you have type II diabetes caused by being overweight and you catch it early enough, you can lose the weigh Continue reading >>

Victoza® Consistently Outperformed Januvia® And Demonstrated Unsurpassed A1c Reductions Vs Trulicity®1-3

Victoza® Consistently Outperformed Januvia® And Demonstrated Unsurpassed A1c Reductions Vs Trulicity®1-3

WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza® causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of liraglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined. Victoza® is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of Victoza® and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (eg, a mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Victoza®. Victoza® (liraglutide) injection 1.2 mg or 1.8 mg is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular (CV) events (CV death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or non-fatal stroke) in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and established CV disease. Victoza® is not a substitute for insulin and should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or diabetic ketoacidosis. Concurrent use with prandial insulin has not been studied. WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza® causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the hum Continue reading >>

Why Diabetics Should Know Their Blood Glucose Levels

Why Diabetics Should Know Their Blood Glucose Levels

If your blood sugar level is too high over a prolonged period of time, you risk kidney, eye and nerve damage, says Dr. Andrew J. Ahmann, director of the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon. If your blood sugar is too low, it could lead to confusion, seizures, or unconsciousness, says Dr. Adam F. Spitz, an endocrinologist with Novant Health Endocrinology in Charlotte, North Carolina. Ultimately, what’s too high or too low depends on the individual, their age and overall health, say Spitz and Ahmann. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 9.3 percent of the U.S. population has diabetes, including 8 million Americans — nearly 30 percent of diabetics — who are undiagnosed. Patients with type 1 diabetes can’t produce insulin, which cells need to produce energy. Those with type 2 diabetes resist the insulin their bodies make. For decades, doctors strived to keep patients’ average blood glucose level, also known as A1c, below 7 percent over a three-month period. However, recent research from Yale University shows that approach — which includes using insulin and medications that lower blood glucose levels — puts sick and elderly patients at risk for low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, which could even lead to death. “It wasn’t until 2009 and 2010 that standards of care from the American Diabetes Association began to focus on the issue of one size didn’t fit all,” Ahmann says. “Since 2009, we’ve seen more education of physicians around the fact that [we] shouldn’t be so aggressive in older people.” While doctors know better now and have more medications to prescribe that won’t lower blood sugar, many diabetic patients can’t afford them, Ahmann says. Also, many pat Continue reading >>

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Reversed?

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Reversed?

Weve heard that diabetes is a chronic progressive illness. You cant get better, you have to get worse. The best you can do is slow it down. But at least five approaches now claim to reverse Type 2. What does that mean? The official expert line on Type 2 has long been that people start by controlling the condition with diet and exercise. But they move fairly quickly to pills (like metformin), then to insulin or insulin plus pills. In recent years, insulin has been started more quickly, and new drugs like the incretin mimetics are changing the progression of treatment. But it is still thought that the disease progresses and cant be stopped. Being told you are chronic progressive is like having a curse put on you. It can sap your confidence and destroy your hope. But is it true? Dozens of Diabetes Self-Management readers say no. On a blog post by Diane Fennell about a study of low-carb diets in Sweden, people commented eloquently on how they have gotten better by reducing carbohydrate intake. Bob wrote: By limiting carbs, my A1c dropped from an 8.6 to a most recent reading of 4.9. I also know people who eat whole-grain pasta, bread and have oatmeal every morning, because a doctor told them so, bemoaning their numbers. Following a different (acid/alkaline) diet, Dan wrote that his A1C dropped, and his cholesterol and blood pressure are normal. Hes off nearly all his statins, blood pressure medicines, and insulin. Terri wrote: I am a diabetic who eats a low carb vegan diet. I am far healthier now at 53 than ever before and maintain perfect glucose control. And on and on. Its worth reading the whole thread, and there are scores of similar discussions all over the Internet. The reality is that people with Type 2 get better all the time. They reduce their medicines or get off Continue reading >>

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