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A1c 6.9

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level 6.9

Blood Sugar Level 6.9

Hello , Iwas just toldby a receptionist at the officethat my blood sugar level is6.9 , which is slightly higher than normal but not diabetic.. Can any help on the topic .I haveto see my Doc on Monday . I have problemswith urination andsemen leakage recently and checked forstdbut all testswere -ve .I alsofeeltoo muchgas in my stomach and feel extremely uncomffortable .I am only 30 Year old. If you live in the U.S. I'm going to assume that 6.9 is an A1C. I'm not sure why you think that is "not diabetic"because it is. Anything over 6.0 is considered diabetes. Please talk with your doctor and get him to clarify which Type you are. He can do an antibody test and a c-peptide which will clarify this. It is important to know how to treat you to be sure of your Type. Then make sure he schedules you to meet with a diabetic educator so you can learn about management of your diabetes. I'm sorry to bring you this information, but diabetes is a manageable condition and the more you learn the better you will do. Continue reading >>

Tale Of A Compliant Patient

Tale Of A Compliant Patient

Nearly 26 million US adults are estimated to have type 2 diabetes, including at least eight million who are unaware they have the disease.1 An additional 80 million adults are affected by prediabetes, with above-average glucose levels that do not yet meet American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria for type 2 diabetes.1,2 In this context, the primary care provider is likely to encounter patients with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in its early stages. Which patients can be considered candidates for conservative management—that is, lifestyle modification—before antidiabetic medications are initiated? Case Patient A black woman, age 44, presented for a routine physical examination. She said she had been in good health until three months earlier, when she began to experience weakness and fatigue. She complained of increased thirst and frequent urination, requiring her to get up three or four times each night. She had increased her average fluid intake to nine glasses a day from the usual four. Despite a good appetite, she had lost about 7 lb over the previous three months. The patient’s previous medical history was significant for four cesarean deliveries, gestational diabetes during all four pregnancies, hemorrhoids, constipation, keloid formation, and hyperlipidemia. Her family history was significant for diabetes (paternal side) and hyperlipidemia. Findings from the patient’s physical exam included weight, 217 lb; height, 5’11”; BMI, 30.3; pulse, 80 beats/min and regular; and blood pressure, 138/78 mm Hg. With the exception of obesity and elevated systolic blood pressure, her physical exam findings were within normal limits. Laboratory testing yielded the following results: urinalysis, 3+ glucose, negative for ketones and protein; fasting blood glucose, 145 Continue reading >>

Control Diabetes Before Pregnancy

Control Diabetes Before Pregnancy

Women with type 1 diabetes should keep their blood glucose levels well controlled before they become pregnant, in order to minimise the risk of serious adverse pregnancy outcomes. Women with type 1 diabetes should keep their blood glucose levels well controlled before they become pregnant, in order to minimise the risk of serious adverse pregnancy outcomes, results of a large Danish study indicate. A blood measurement known as A1C is an indicator of how well glucose levels are kept in the normal range over the long term. The goal of the present study was to find a threshold pre-conception value for A1C, below which the risk of having a baby with malformations or that dies soon after birth is no higher than in the general population. The study looked at 933 women with diabetes who were having their first baby. Forty-five babies were born with birth defects, including 23 that were major, and 31 infants died before or soon after delivery, of which 5 involved major malformations, Dr Dorte Jensen, at the University of Southern Denmark, Odense, and her associates report in the medical journal Diabetes Care. They found that the risk of serious adverse outcomes was statistically no higher than for the background population when women with diabetes had A1C readings of less than 6.9% around the time of conception. The risk of serious adverse outcomes increased gradually with levels of A1C above 6.9%, and doubled when it reached 10.3%; at A1C readings of 10.4% or greater, the risk quadrupled. "In conclusion," the investigators write, "the results of this study support a recommendation of preconceptional A1C levels less than 7% in women with type 1 diabetes, emphasising the importance of prepregnancy counselling." Continue reading >>

This Calculator Uses The 2007 Adag Formula To Estimate A1c And Average Blood Glucose Equivalents.

This Calculator Uses The 2007 Adag Formula To Estimate A1c And Average Blood Glucose Equivalents.

Enter a value into one of the fields below then press convert. A1c Value: Average Blood Glucose mg/dl or mmol/L Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Hba1c

Understanding Your Hba1c

You’ve heard about a diabetes test called a hemoglobin A1C. It’s sometimes shortened to HgbA1c or HbA1c or just A1C. Hopefully, you know what yours is. But do you know what it means and what to do with the information? Hemoglobin is what makes red blood cells red. It consists of several proteins wrapped around an iron-based molecule called heme. Heme attaches to oxygen and carries it to the cells. That’s why iron is important in our diets. We need iron to make heme to carry oxygen, so our cells can breathe. Glucose (sugar) molecules are also floating along in our blood. Glucose attaches itself to all kinds of proteins, including the hemoglobin in red blood cells (RBCs). When glucose levels are high, many more of them will attach. Hemoglobin coated with glucose is called “glycated” or “glycosylated” hemoglobin. Glycation (“sugar-coating”) may not harm an RBC, but it does tell us if the cell has encountered much glucose during its lifetime. The more glucose has been in the blood, the more RBCs will be glycated. This is what an HbA1c test measures. A1C isn’t measuring what your blood glucose level is at the moment. It measures how high glucose has been over the last two months or so. RBCs only live about 100–120 days in the bloodstream. Once they become glycated, they stay glycated for life, so the number of glycated RBCs (HbA1c) gives a good picture of how much glucose has been in the blood recently. The A1C test has several advantages over other tests such as a fasting blood sugar (FBS). You don’t have to fast for an A1C. It can be taken at any time of day. It doesn’t matter what you ate the day before or on the day of the test, because it’s not measuring your current sugar. Normally, between 4.2% and 5.6% of RBCs will be glycated. The America Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that blood glucose screening for adults begin at age 45, or sooner if you are overweight and have additional risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. There are several blood tests for prediabetes. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test This test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the test measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. In general: An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal An A1C level between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates type 2 diabetes Certain conditions can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you are pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant). Fasting blood sugar test A blood sample is taken after you fast for at least eight hours or overnight. In general: A fasting blood sugar level below 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — 5.6 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) — is considered normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 7.0 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. This result is sometimes called impaired fasting glucose. A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L) or higher indicates type 2 diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test This test is usually used to diagnose diabetes only during pregnancy. A blood sample is taken after you fast for at least eight hours or overnight. Then you'll drink a sugary solution, and your blood sugar level will be measured again after two hours. In general: A blood sugar level less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmo Continue reading >>

What Does Your A1c Number Really Mean?

What Does Your A1c Number Really Mean?

We dFolk are bombarded with numbers, goals, and targets. We’re frequently told where we should be, but not how high our risk is when we can’t reach our targets. Here, we break down A1C numbers into a simple green-light, yellow-light, red-light format, to give you perspective on when (and how much) to worry, when to relax, when to call your doc, and when to call 911. Green-light A1C score For most people, the target for A1C, the green light, is between 6.0% and 6.9%. These numbers are commonly expressed simply as 6.0 and 6.9, without the % sign. If your A1C falls into this zone, you’re considered to be in control. For perspective, these numbers can be converted into “meter” numbers called estimated average glucose—eAG for short. The green light eAG range is 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/l) to 151 mg/dL (8.39 mmol/l). But what if your numbers are higher than target? Or lower than target? When are you actually in danger? Yellow-light A1C score If the light turns yellow as you approach the intersection, you need to either speed up or stop. Whichever is safe under the circumstances, right? If your A1C is between 7.0 and 8.9, you’ll be classified as “out of control.” But how much danger are you in? Frankly, it depends upon how close you are to either end of the spectrum. Yellow-light A1Cs are higher than is strictly healthy, but pose no immediate harm. However, the higher you are in this range, the closer you are to a red light. We’ll talk about just how serious that can be in a minute. I should point out that there are some special cases. If you’re a very young type 1, a yellow-light A1C score may be considered in-target for you until you get older. Similarly, if you’re an elderly type 2, or have a history of severe hypoglycemia, you doctor may choose to “green Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

How Does A1c Affect Hospitalizations For Heart Failure?

How Does A1c Affect Hospitalizations For Heart Failure?

How Does A1c Affect Hospitalizations for Heart Failure? The Relationship Between Glycaemic Control and Heart Failure in 83,021 Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Lind M, Olsson M, Rosengren A, Svensson A-M, Bounias I, Gudbjrnsdottir S In this observational analysis of the Swedish National Diabetes Register, 83,021 type 2 diabetes patients were identified from 1998 to 2003 and followed until either a hospitalization for heart failure, death, or the end of 2009. The main explanatory variable was mean A1c. The investigators reported incidence rates of heart failure per 1000 person-years adjusted for age, sex, and duration of diabetes. They then estimated the risk for heart failure using Cox proportional hazards models to adjust for age, sex, diabetes duration, body mass index , smoking, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, ischemic heart disease, heart valve disease, glucose-lowering therapy, antihypertensive medication, and microalbuminuria. About 13.2% of the patients experienced a hospitalization with a primary or secondary diagnosis of heart failure during the study period. The unadjusted incidence rates of heart failure increased significantly from 13.8% in patients with A1c < 6.0% to 25.8% for patients with A1c 10.0%. After adjustment for all covariates, patients with mean A1c of 6%-6.9% had significantly lower risk for heart failure hospitalization than patients with A1c < 6.0%. At A1c levels of 8.0%, risk for heart failure increased progressively and significantly compared with patients with A1c < 6.0%. Heart failure occurs in patients with diabetes at 2.5 times the rate of the general population.[ 1 ] Whenever a condition is more common in diabetes, the tendency is to believe that hyperglycemia must be a contributing cause Continue reading >>

What Is The A1c Test For Diabetes?

What Is The A1c Test For Diabetes?

Hemoglobin A1c is a test used to tell you your average blood sugar over time. In this video, Ronald Tamler, MD, clinical director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center, explains the test and what its results mean. For someone who doesn't have diabetes, a normal A1C level can range from 4.5 to 6 percent. Someone who's had uncontrolled diabetes for a long time might have an A1C level above 9 percent. A1C test is used to diagnose diabetes, an A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. For someone who doesn't have diabetes, a normal A1C level can range from 4.5 to 6 percent. Someone who's had uncontrolled diabetes for a long time might have an A1C level above 9 percent. For most people who have previously diagnosed diabetes, an A1C level of 7 percent or less is a common treatment target. Higher targets may be chosen in some individuals. If your A1C level is above your target, your doctor may recommend a change in your diabetes treatment plan. Remember, the higher your A1C level, the higher your risk of diabetes complications. An A1C test is a quick lab test that allows your doc to get a sense of your average day and night blood sugars for the last three months. Your A1C score should be between 6.0 and 6.9. If you have diabetes, you should have an AIC test four times a year. Diabetes Warrior: Be your own knight in shining armor. How to stay healthy and happy with diabetes. You survived the first year: now there is more to learn... Knights? Dragons? Diabetes?! Yep, armed with a wickedly sharp sense of humor and a medieval metaphor, Taming the Tiger author William Lee... The A1C test is a test that measures a person's avera Continue reading >>

A1c From 11.6 To 6.9 - Diabetes

A1c From 11.6 To 6.9 - Diabetes

I went in today for my first 3 month checkup. I was amazed at what I saw. They put me on insulin but I would wake up <70 so I stopped. Diet, Exercise, Metformin has been working for me. Just wanted to share that good things can happen! Hi! Congratulations! I think we have a similar case, and I would love to know what your diet/exercises are. Can you expound a bit more on this? Thank you!! so, my wife and I are using the plated "diabetic" meals and also sticking to a low carb diet. Depending on my morning tests, if its <~120 then I have oatmeal (not microwave) with 2 eggs, coffee. Otherwise I have a protein shake using water and chia,hemp,flax seeds which is about 5carbs total. I wake up early enough to test my blood and decide if I can go back to bed (<100) or need to ride our stationary bike for 30 min. Lunch is pan seared chicken breast and oven roasted Brussels. This works for us because we love it. We do use a slow cooker to roast a whole chicken at least once a week, so chicken basically. Also canned tune works. I normally take a 2-3 mile bike ride (outside) during the day (I work from home) to help keep things level. Before dinner I check blood again and see what I can eat or if I need to ride the stationary again. same thing for snacks later on. I love popcorn so I test and see if I can have the 3 cups that they recommend or if I need to suck it up and ride the bike for 2 episodes of something on tv. Basically it comes down to checking and resolving. Figuring out what you like to eat and CAN eat all the time and not get bored of. I was vegan for 5 years and got used to the concept of food as nutrition and NOT a reward or indulgence... don't get me wrong.. I love some good food. It takes discipline. Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c definition and facts Hemoglobin A1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells that sugar molecules stick to, usually for the life of the red blood cell (about three months). The higher the level of glucose in the blood, the higher the level of hemoglobin A1c is detectable on red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1c levels correlate with average levels of glucose in the blood over an approximately three-month time period. Normal ranges for hemoglobin A1c in people without diabetes is about 4% to 5.9%. People with diabetes with poor glucose control have hemoglobin A1c levels above 7%. Hemoglobin A1c levels are routinely used to determine blood sugar control over time in people with diabetes. Decreasing hemoglobin A1c levels by 1% may decrease the risk of microvascular complications (for example, diabetic eye, nerve, or kidney disease) by 10%. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be checked, according to the American Diabetic Association, every six months in individuals with stable blood sugar control, and every three months if the person is trying to establish stable blood sugar control. Hemoglobin A1c has many other names such as glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and HbA1c. To explain what hemoglobin A1c is, think in simple terms. Sugar sticks to things, and when it has been stuck to something for a long time it's harder to the get sugar (glucose) off. In the body, sugar sticks too, particularly to proteins. The red blood cells that circulate in the body live for about three months before they die. When sugar (glucose) sticks to these red blood cells by binding to hemoglobin A1c, it gives us an idea of how much glucose has been around in the blood for the preceding three months. Hemoglobin A1c is a minor component of hemoglobin to which gl Continue reading >>

The Hemoglobin A1c Blood Test For Type 2 Diabetes

The Hemoglobin A1c Blood Test For Type 2 Diabetes

The hemoglobin A1C is a great blood test for a diabetic. You can know how well your blood sugar control has been over a few months. But this test will not replace daily glucose monitors. It has other limitations too. Still, the HbA1C blood test is my favorite of all type 2 diabetic tests. For one thing, it does not require fasting. For another, it can be done in the doctor's office with a single fingerstick just like a glucose monitor test. You get results in six minutes. Best of all, it lets you know how your blood sugar has been doing over the past two or three months. The test sounds perfect, but it is not. For diabetes management you need to know what your blood sugar levels are every day. Daily blood testing is still necessary, because a type 2 diabetic on insulin needs to know his glucose levels several times a day, not just every three months. A great HBA1C reading does not mean there have been no hyperglycemic (high blood sugar) or hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) episodes over the last few months. So the hemoglobin A1C cannot replace daily checks with your glucose monitor and good log book records. Your doctor always asks what your last daily reading was, and he likes to see your log book too. Daily readings along with the A1C give a complete picture of what is going on with your diabetes treatment. Taken together with daily readings, the hemoglobin A1C tells you if your blood sugar is staying in the range that will keep away the complications. There is more and more evidence that an A1C between 6.5 and 7 will do just that. And here's an encouraging fact. If your A1C was 9 and you lowered it to 8, there is a 20% reduction in your risk of complications. That means you do not have to be in the best range yet to see benefits from better blood sugar control. Hemoglob Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

The hemoglobin A1c test tells you your average level of blood sugar over the past 2 to 3 months. It's also called HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, and glycohemoglobin. People who have diabetes need this test regularly to see if their levels are staying within range. It can tell if you need to adjust your diabetes medicines. The A1c test is also used to diagnose diabetes. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells. It gives blood its red color, and it’s job is to carry oxygen throughout your body. The sugar in your blood is called glucose. When glucose builds up in your blood, it binds to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. The A1c test measures how much glucose is bound. Red blood cells live for about 3 months, so the test shows the average level of glucose in your blood for the past 3 months. If your glucose levels have been high over recent weeks, your hemoglobin A1c test will be higher. For people without diabetes, the normal range for the hemoglobin A1c level is between 4% and 5.6%. Hemoglobin A1c levels between 5.7% and 6.4% mean you have a higher change of getting of diabetes. Levels of 6.5% or higher mean you have diabetes. The target A1c level for people with diabetes is usually less than 7%. The higher the hemoglobin A1c, the higher your risk of having complications related to diabetes. A combination of diet, exercise, and medication can bring your levels down. People with diabetes should have an A1c test every 3 months to make sure their blood sugar is in their target range. If your diabetes is under good control, you may be able to wait longer between the blood tests. But experts recommend checking at least two times a year. People with diseases affecting hemoglobin, such as anemia, may get misleading results with this test. Other things that can Continue reading >>

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