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A1c 12

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

The Effects Of Ginger On Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-i And Malondialdehyde In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus can be defined as a group of metabolic diseases characterized by chronic hyperglycemia resulting from impaired insulin action/secretion and is classified into two major categories, type 1 and type 2. Type 2 diabetes accounts for >90% of diabetes and is resulting in impaired function in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. Effective control of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients is critical for reducing the risk of micro- and macro-vascular diseases (1). The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions and has affected 6.4% of adults worldwide in 2010 (2). The global prevalence for all age groups was estimated to be 4.4% in 2030 (3). The number of patients suffering from diabetes, among the 25-64 years old Iranians is 7.7%, equal to 2 million patients, which half of them are not aware of their disease. As well as, 6.8%, equal to 4.4 million of Iranian adults have impaired fasting glucose (4). Dyslipidemia (lipid abnormalities) resulting from uncontrolled hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in diabetic patients is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease (5). Recently, attention has been focused on the relationship between production of free radicals, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the pathogenesis as well as progression of diabetes mellitus. Mechanisms that contribute to the formation of free radicals in diabetes mellitus may include metabolic stress resulting from changes in energy metabolism, inflammatory mediators and impaired antioxidant defense mechanisms (5). Hyperglycemia increases oxidative stress through the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which results in an imbalance between free radicals and the antioxidant defense system o Continue reading >>

Understanding Your A1c Reading With Your Eag: Estimated Average Glucose

Understanding Your A1c Reading With Your Eag: Estimated Average Glucose

Every three to six months we have our A1C measured"but what does that number really mean? You know it’s a measure of your average blood sugar reading, but when was the last time your blood glucose monitor gave you a percentage? Your A1C is essentially a measurement of the Advanced Glycogenated End-products that have accumulated in your blood from blood sugar levels"the higher our blood sugars are, the more AGEs are present in our blood. These AGEs are also what lead to various complications we’re warned about: nerve damage, retinopathy, etc. So, as usual, our goal is to reduce our A1C which will reduce our AGEs, and we do this by controlling our blood sugars better. The Joslin Diabetes Center recently published an article about a new way to report your A1C so you can translate that number to the numbers you see on your monitor. This is your eAG= Estimated Average Glucose. So what does it mean to you when your doctor says your A1C is 8%? According to the Joslin article an A1C of 8% means your eAG is 183, which means your blood sugars run usually between 147 to 217. My last A1C was 7.6%. This means my blood sugars run between 140 to 200 on average through the day. The lowest A1C I’ve ever had was 6.2% and the highest I’ve had was a few years ago when I started college, at 8.4%. **Here’s a chart for your A1C readings translated to your eAG: 12% = 298 (240 - 347) 11% = 269 (217 - 314) 10% = 240 (193 - 282) 9% = 212 (170 -249) 8% = 183 (147 - 217) 7% = 154 (123 - 185) 6% = 126 ( 100 - 152)** So, if your A1C is 11%, your average glucose reading is 269, which means ninty-five percent of the day your blood sugar is somewhere between 217 to 314. Numbers like those makes it much more difficult to ignore that 11% We all know we can’t be feeling very well or be treating Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Hba1c

Understanding Your Hba1c

You’ve heard about a diabetes test called a hemoglobin A1C. It’s sometimes shortened to HgbA1c or HbA1c or just A1C. Hopefully, you know what yours is. But do you know what it means and what to do with the information? Hemoglobin is what makes red blood cells red. It consists of several proteins wrapped around an iron-based molecule called heme. Heme attaches to oxygen and carries it to the cells. That’s why iron is important in our diets. We need iron to make heme to carry oxygen, so our cells can breathe. Glucose (sugar) molecules are also floating along in our blood. Glucose attaches itself to all kinds of proteins, including the hemoglobin in red blood cells (RBCs). When glucose levels are high, many more of them will attach. Hemoglobin coated with glucose is called “glycated” or “glycosylated” hemoglobin. Glycation (“sugar-coating”) may not harm an RBC, but it does tell us if the cell has encountered much glucose during its lifetime. The more glucose has been in the blood, the more RBCs will be glycated. This is what an HbA1c test measures. A1C isn’t measuring what your blood glucose level is at the moment. It measures how high glucose has been over the last two months or so. RBCs only live about 100–120 days in the bloodstream. Once they become glycated, they stay glycated for life, so the number of glycated RBCs (HbA1c) gives a good picture of how much glucose has been in the blood recently. The A1C test has several advantages over other tests such as a fasting blood sugar (FBS). You don’t have to fast for an A1C. It can be taken at any time of day. It doesn’t matter what you ate the day before or on the day of the test, because it’s not measuring your current sugar. Normally, between 4.2% and 5.6% of RBCs will be glycated. The America Continue reading >>

Husbands A1c Was 12. Something. His Doctor Said It Is Time For Insulin. But...

Husbands A1c Was 12. Something. His Doctor Said It Is Time For Insulin. But...

Husbands A1C was 12. something. His Doctor said it is time for insulin. But... Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Husbands A1C was 12. something. His Doctor said it is time for insulin. But... Husbands A1C was 12. something the other day. His Doctor said it is time for insulin. But the doctor does not know that my husband never tests his BG and and does not watch what he eats. I was wondering if it is possible for him to still lower his A1C and not have to go on insulin. I would be willing to make sure only low carb foods are in the house and remind him to check his BG every morning. He is going back to Doctor this Friday to get started and I just wondered if he told the doctor the truth is the doctor would agree to give him a little more timeand retest in maybe, 4 weeks????? Does anyone have any experience with this situation?? My question is why are you afraid of his going on insulin? Insulin is just a TOOL to get healthy and avoid complications. At his level, he may already have some (I would suggest an appointment with an opthomologist to be sure there is no damage. He probably does not, but anything that may be there is best treated in early stages) Would you be upset if he needed a cane, or glasses, or a hearing aid? Just because he starts insulin, does not mean he is on it forever. There are many folks who took it to get themselves in control with diet and exercise, and got off of it. But, he needs to get those numbers down. That is very high! The other thing is, does your HUSBAND want to do the low carb, test, etc. If you are his diabetic cop, he is going to resent you, and may do things behind your back. Only HE can w Continue reading >>

In Search Of: The Highest Diabetes A1c In History

In Search Of: The Highest Diabetes A1c In History

My most recent A1C was nothing to be proud of, but I consoled myself with the thought that it was hardly the worst in history. That got me wondering: What was the all-time worst A1C? Who holds this dubious record, and how high is it possible to go? I decided to pound the pavement and try to find out. So where to start when looking for a diabetes record? Well, with the Guinness Book of World Records, of course. But oddly, the Guinness people don’t seem to have any listings related to A1Cs. They do, however, report that Michael Patrick Buonocore survived a blood sugar of 2,656 mg/dL upon admittance to the ER in East Stroudsburg, PA, on March 23, 2008. Michael was a T1 kiddo at the time, and that record-high sugar level was part of his diagnosis experience. So does Michael also hold the record for top A1C? No. Because while he’s living (thankfully) proof that stratospheric blood sugar levels are possible, a sky-scraping A1C requires both altitude and time. Remember that A1Cs provide a three-month average of our blood sugars. Individual high BG readings, even crazy-high ones, don’t alter the test as much as you’d think if they last only a short time. Because type 1 in kids Michael's age hit so quickly, I figured his A1C would have been rather middle of the road. It takes a slow burn to make an A1C boil. But just to be sure, I reached out to his parents, who tell me his A1C was 11.9 at diagnosis. Higher than I expected, but not too high given the four-digit BG reading. (If his 2,656 had been his average blood sugar for three months, his A1C would have been roughly 95! Yes, that’s 95.0, not 9.5). The highest A1C turns out to be a tricky piece of data to ferret out. If you try Google, you find a gazillion people talking about their own personal highest A1Cs, and comp Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c definition and facts Hemoglobin A1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells that sugar molecules stick to, usually for the life of the red blood cell (about three months). The higher the level of glucose in the blood, the higher the level of hemoglobin A1c is detectable on red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1c levels correlate with average levels of glucose in the blood over an approximately three-month time period. Normal ranges for hemoglobin A1c in people without diabetes is about 4% to 5.9%. People with diabetes with poor glucose control have hemoglobin A1c levels above 7%. Hemoglobin A1c levels are routinely used to determine blood sugar control over time in people with diabetes. Decreasing hemoglobin A1c levels by 1% may decrease the risk of microvascular complications (for example, diabetic eye, nerve, or kidney disease) by 10%. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be checked, according to the American Diabetic Association, every six months in individuals with stable blood sugar control, and every three months if the person is trying to establish stable blood sugar control. Hemoglobin A1c has many other names such as glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and HbA1c. To explain what hemoglobin A1c is, think in simple terms. Sugar sticks to things, and when it has been stuck to something for a long time it's harder to the get sugar (glucose) off. In the body, sugar sticks too, particularly to proteins. The red blood cells that circulate in the body live for about three months before they die. When sugar (glucose) sticks to these red blood cells by binding to hemoglobin A1c, it gives us an idea of how much glucose has been around in the blood for the preceding three months. Hemoglobin A1c is a minor component of hemoglobin to which gl Continue reading >>

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

The A1C blood test is a simple test that analyzes your glucose (blood sugar) levels by measuring the amount of glycated hemoglobin in your blood. Hemoglobin is a protein in your red blood cells; when glucose enters the blood, it attaches to the hemoglobin. The result is glycated hemoglobin. The more glucose in your blood, the higher your glycated hemoglobin. The A1C is a valuable indicator of how well your diabetes management plan is working. While your individual A1C goal will depend on factors including your age and your personal medical profile, most people with diabetes aim to keep their A1C below 7 percent. By keeping your A1C number within your target range, you can reduce the risk of diabetes complications. While it is important to develop a long-term diabetes management plan with your physician, there are several steps you can take right away to help reduce your A1C. Small changes add up, so consider trying some of these strategies to lower your A1C this week. 1. Try Short Sessions of High Intensity Exercise According to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2015, type 2 diabetes patients who did 10 minutes of exercise three times a day, five days a week at 85 percent of their target heart rate had a twofold improvement in A1C levels compared to patients who exercised for 30 minutes a day at 65 percent of their target heart rate. Be sure to check with your doctor before trying high intensity exercise, and wear a heart rate monitor so you don’t overdo it. 2. Shrink Your Dinner Plate Instead of a large dinner plate for your meals, use a smaller salad plate. This simple swap can trick your eyes and brain into thinking you’re eating more than you really are, and you’ll feel satisfied with less food. It’s especially helpfu Continue reading >>

Your Average Blood Sugar: Why It Really Matters

Your Average Blood Sugar: Why It Really Matters

If there was a blood test that could give you valuable information about a major, yet reversible risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and age related dementia, would you want to take it? What if that same blood test could also give you information about your risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, vision loss, cancer and how fast you can expect your body to age? What if the test was really cheap? Now, what if you knew that what you were going to have to do to reverse your risk of all these conditions was going to be personally challenging, maybe even really hard, would you still want to take the test? Something to think about, isn’t it? The test I’m talking about does exist. It’s a simple little test that’s run all the time. It’s full implications are rarely considered, however. The test It’s called “hemoglobin A1c” and is sometimes referred to simply as the “A1c” test. In essence, it measures the amount of sugar that has become stuck to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells (hemoglobin is the component in blood that carries oxygen). Because red blood cells live for about 3 to 4 months, the test is usually used to estimate an “average blood sugar” for the previous 3 months. The more sugar floating around in your blood on a daily basis, the higher you A1c value will be. In conventional medicine the test is used to diagnose and monitor treatment goals for diabetics. The implications of a person’s A1c value run much deeper, however. Sugar within the body doesn’t just stick to hemoglobin. It sticks to many tissues that are made of proteins and fats (this accounts for most tissues in your body by the way) and can bind directly to DNA. The compounds formed by this process are called advanced glycation end products or “AGEs” for Continue reading >>

What Is The A1c Test? How Does A1c Relate To Blood Glucose?

What Is The A1c Test? How Does A1c Relate To Blood Glucose?

Anyone with diabetes will be familiar with finger-prick testing for monitoring blood glucose to see how well they are managing their disease. This kind of regular testing is essential for most people with diabetes, but what role does an occasional hemoglobin A1C blood test play in controlling blood sugars, and how does it work? Contents of this article: What is the A1C test? The abbreviation A1C is used in the US (sometimes with a lower-case 'c' - A1c) and is short for glycated hemoglobin (sometimes called 'glycosylated' hemoglobin or glycohemoglobin). The other abbreviations in use are: HbA1c (widely used internationally) HbA1c Hb1c HgbA1C. The A1C test is a blood test used to measure the average level of glucose in the blood over the last two to three months. This test is used to check how well blood sugar levels are being controlled in a person with diabetes and can also be used in the diagnosis of diabetes.1 Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells which is responsible for transporting oxygen around the body. When blood glucose levels are elevated, some of the glucose binds to hemoglobin and, as red blood cells typically have a lifespan of 120 days, A1C (glycated hemoglobin) is a useful test because it offers an indication of longer term blood glucose levels.2 The particular type of hemoglobin that glucose attaches to is hemoglobin A, and the combined result is call glycated hemoglobin. As blood glucose levels rise, more glycated hemoglobin forms, and it persists for the lifespan of red blood cells, about four months.2 Therefore, the A1C level directly correlates to the average blood glucose level over the previous 8-12 weeks; A1C is a reliable test that has been refined and standardized using clinical trial data.3 There are two key things to know about the appl Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

A1c Has Anyone Ever Been At A 12 And Got It Down To Normal?

A1c Has Anyone Ever Been At A 12 And Got It Down To Normal?

cwrig Posts: 190Member, Premium Member Posts: 190Member, Premium Member So; yes it can be done. A1C is basically your BG average over the last 3 months (the life of your blood cells). So you can predict your A1C over 3 months by frequently testing your BG. The rule of thumb is to not let your BG spike to or over 140 1 to 2 hours after a meal; and shoot for 100 or lower before meals or fasting. If you do this consistently, your A1C will reflect this. Most of us control BG by limiting/managing the # of carbs consumed. Gentyl Posts: 182Member Member Posts: 182Member Member Thank you. I am praying that I can get it down. Yes! It can be done! I was diagnosed with a 10.7 A1C and a fasting of 317. I was another one who recognized I was allergic to carbohydrates, went on a very low carb and high fat diet, pretty low calories for a while, lost all my weight in 6 monhts and all my A1Cs since then (almost 2 years now) have been in the 4% range (mostly 4.7). I was put on Metformin 2000 mg a day and got off of that in about 9 months (should have gotten off at the 6th month or sooner). There were going to put me on insulin two or three weeks after I started metformin, but with LCHF, by the time I went back, my blood sugars were normal. I try to keep my blood sugars in the 80s or a bit lower (but I can visit the 90s and low 100s from time to time). My fasting is usually in the 70s now. I encourage you to read "The Diabetes Solution" by Dr. Bernstein and visit bloodsugar101.com and read that from "cover to cover". swalewis Posts: 26Member Member Posts: 26Member Member Yes! My initial a1c was over 12 and after 4 months down to 5.4 through low carb eating, increased exercise and metformin. It can be done, but everyone is unique and takes their own path to living healthy. GlucernaBrand P Continue reading >>

Type 2s: Insulin Early Is Easy, Insulin Late Is Not

Type 2s: Insulin Early Is Easy, Insulin Late Is Not

I keep reading postings here and there on the web from people with Type 2 diabetes that say something like, "My A1c was 11.5% even with Metformin, so my doctor told me it was time to go on insulin." It is postings like this that bring home to me why so many Type 2s develop terrible complications, and even more importantly, why even those who are taking insulin often have dangerously high blood sugars. The most conservative of medical groups--the ADA--tells doctors that an A1c over 7% is going to cause serious diabetic complications like blindness and kidney failure. Yet these people's doctors have encouraged them to dick around with oral drugs when their A1cs were 10% or higher! The years they've spent at those dangerously high blood sugar levels waiting for oral drugs to do what all the research evidence shows oral drugs cannot do have wreaked havoc on their organs that may not be completely reversible, no matter what their blood sugars might be in the future. In fact, a recent survey I read somewhere on the web found that most family doctors don't put their patients on even an oral drug until the patient has spent a year with an A1c of 8% or higher. That is a whole, long year where dangerously high blood sugars are producing early retinopathy, advancing neuropathy, and making small changes that lead to kidney failure. Since none of the oral drugs is capable of lowering A1c much more than 1%, this kind of treatment is criminal. A patient whose A1c is 11.5% on metformin probably started out with an A1c of 12% or even higher. If you don't believe me, go read the Prescribing Information for each of the common diabetes drugs. They show exactly what the median change in A1c is that their drugs can achieve, and you'll see it is rarely much more than a 1% drop in A1c. For a p Continue reading >>

A1c Test

A1c Test

Print Overview The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well you're managing your diabetes. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications. Why it's done An international committee of experts from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the International Diabetes Federation, recommend that the A1C test be the primary test used to diagnose prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. After a diabetes diagnosis, the A1C test is used to monitor your diabetes treatment plan. Since the A1C test measures your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months instead of your blood sugar level at a specific point in time, it is a better reflection of how well your diabetes treatment plan is working overall. Your doctor will likely use the A1C test when you're first diagnosed with diabetes. This also helps establish a baseline A1C level. The test may then need to be repeated while you're learning to control your blood sugar. Later, how often you need the A1C test depends on the type of diabetes you have, your treatment plan and how well you're managing your blood sugar. For example, the A1C test may be recommended: Once every year if you have prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes Twice a year if Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Significance Of The A1c Test: Part 2 In A Series

Diabetes And The Significance Of The A1c Test: Part 2 In A Series

Audrey Demmitt, RN, BSN, is a nurse diabetic educator, VisionAware Peer Advisor, AFB Career Connect mentor, and author of the VisionAware multi-part blog series on diabetes and diabetes education. At age 25, Audrey was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa and continued to work as a nurse for 30 years with her visual impairment. She has worked as an Adjustment to Blindness Counselor and Diabetic Educator for Vision Rehabilitation Services of Georgia and as a school nurse providing in-service training for school staff and developing care plans for newly-diagnosed students and their families. In Part 1 of her series, Audrey discussed how diabetes education can help lower your blood sugars and reduce the risk of diabetic retinopathy. In this week's Part 2, Audrey emphasizes the significance of the A1c test in the effective diagnosis, treatment, and management of diabetes. As Audrey says, "By making daily efforts to stick to your treatment plan and making healthy lifestyle changes, you can achieve your A1c goal, avoid long-term complications, and live well with diabetes." How Diabetes Is Diagnosed When teaching people with diabetes, I encourage them to "know their numbers" and use them to better manage their diabetes. Let's take a look at the A1c and why it is an important number. Diabetes is a complex condition to diagnose and manage. In the early stages, there are no symptoms and in the long term, there can be devastating effects on every system in the body. Prevention, early detection, and vigilant management are key factors in reducing diabetes complications, such as blindness and blood vessel disease. The A1c blood test, also known as glycated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c, and HbA1c, is the primary tool used to diagnose diabetes and pre-diabetes and to monitor blood glucos Continue reading >>

Factor Analysis Of Changes In Hemoglobin A1c After 12 Months Of Sitagliptin Therapy In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Factor Analysis Of Changes In Hemoglobin A1c After 12 Months Of Sitagliptin Therapy In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Factor Analysis of Changes in Hemoglobin A1c After 12 Months of Sitagliptin Therapy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes cDivision of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan aStudy Group of the Hypertension Committee, Kanagawa Physicians Association, Kanagawa, Japan bStudy Group of the Diabetes Committee, Kanagawa Physicians Association, Kanagawa, Japan cDivision of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan dDepartment of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Kanagawa, Japan eCorresponding Author: Ikuro Matsuba, Matsuba Medical Clinic, 2-159 Tsukagoshi, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa 212-0024, Japan. Email: [email protected] This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, is an effective oral antidiabetic agent as both monotherapy and when combined with insulin. Data from three observational studies performed in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving sitagliptin therapy in the routine clinical setting were integrated to conduct factor analysis of the changes in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), body weight, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over 12 months. Among patients with type 2 diabetes attending medical institutions affiliated with Kanagawa Physicians Association, those using sitagliptin were followed for 1 year. In the ASSET-K and ASSIST-K studies, patients were managed by diabetologists, whi Continue reading >>

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