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A1c 10.1

The A1c Test: Uses, Procedure, Results

The A1c Test: Uses, Procedure, Results

The A1C test, also known as an HbA1C, hemoglobin A1c,glycated hemoglobin, or glycosylated hemoglobin test, is a blood test that shows your average blood sugar levels for the past two to three months. It's a broader test than conventional home glucose monitoring , which measures your blood sugar at any given moment. It's used to diagnose and monitor diabetes. Hemoglobin A, a protein found inside red blood cells, carries oxygen throughout your body. When there's glucose in your bloodstream, it can stick (glycate) to hemoglobin A. The more glucose that's in your blood, the more it does this, creating a higher percentage of glycated hemoglobin proteins. Once glucose sticks to a hemoglobin protein , it typically remains there for the lifespan of the hemoglobin A protein (as long as 120 days). This means that, at any moment, the glucose attached to the hemoglobin A protein reflects the level of your blood sugar over the last two to three months. The A1C test measures how much glucose is actually stuck to hemoglobin A, or more specifically, what percent of hemoglobin proteins are glycated. Hemoglobin with glucose attached to it is called A1C. Thus, having a 7percentA1C means that 7 percent of your hemoglobin proteins are glycated. Your doctor may order an A1C test for these reasons: If you're overweight or obese and you have one or more other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes , your doctor will likely order an A1C test as part of your normal medical exam every year. Such risk factors include: High-risk ethnicity (Native American, African American, Latino, Asian American) The majority of people who end up with type 2 diabetes have prediabetes first, which means that your blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes. The A1C tes Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Levels

Hemoglobin A1c Levels

Hemoglobin A1c Levels [box] What You Need To Know About Your Hemoglobin A1c Levels Your hemoglobin A1c levels measure your average blood sugar over the last 2 to 3 months. Hemoglobin A1c levels give you an idea of how your diabetes control is doing overall. What You Need To Do About Your Hemoglobin A1c Levels You need to check your hemoglobin A1c level at least twice a year, and more frequently if your blood sugar is poorly controlled. Talk with your doctor about your hemoglobin A1c goal, but most will want a level of 7% or less. What Do My Hemoglobin A1c Levels Mean? Your hemoglobin A1c level gives you an idea of how well your blood sugar has been controlled over the last several months. This test lets you know if your diabetes plan is working or not. Hemoglobin A1c levels are a reliable method of assessing how well your blood sugar has been controlled. Elevated levels over long periods of time are associated with the long-term complications of diabetes. After reviewing your hemoglobin A1c levels, your doctor will recommend changes in your treatment plan or tell you that your diabetes plan seem to be going well. How Does the Hemoglobin A1c Test Work? When you have excess blood sugar in your bloodstream it binds with hemoglobin or glycates. The more excess blood sugar the more hemoglobin gets glycated. As a result, the higher your hemoglobin A1c the more poorly controlled your diabetes. Because the average hemoglobin cell lives for 120 days, your hemoglobin A1c level can reflect your blood glucose control over that time. In a person without diabetes, the hemoglobin A1c level is about 5%. According to new standards, diabetes can be diagnosed when the hemoglobin A1c level reaches 6.5%. How Often Should I Have My Hemoglobin A1c Level Checked? Your doctor will likely check Continue reading >>

A1c 10.1 -> 6.6 In 3 Months

A1c 10.1 -> 6.6 In 3 Months

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. 3 months ago my Dr said I crossed the threshold to type 2. My a1c came in at 10.1. Had my 3 month checkup Thursday. The test came back with 6.6. He stopped and shrugged 5 times during the visit to say I was doing great. Based on the look on his face, I guess he's not used to people getting under 7 that fast. That's terrific. Are your sugars usually stable? A1C can be misleading if you go high and low a lot, but if they're consistently average, you're doing awesome! Great work!!! How did you do it??? Diet?? Meds???? Congratulations. I am 7 weeks into this journey and would love to know how you did it. My doc was very pleased with me, too--I went from 9.5 to 6.2 in 3 months, so similar to you. I went very strictly low carb and was on metformin. it is great to make doctors stop and smile and shrug. they get so many non-compliant patients - especially with diabetes. my Doc has pointed out that out of his diabetic patients only two of us are actually doing well and being proactive. most are obese, highly IR and have well developed complications starting. as he says, "you watch them get sicker and sicker...". sometimes he says i am his "star patient". when he does i get a sticker on my hand from the Nurse... yes. i am 54 years old. never too old for a good laugh... I'm taking metaformin. Not really doing a lot with special diet. I have played, trying this and that, then checking sugar. It's all over the place. One big change for me is potatoes and pasta. Two main staples. I limit those and eat carrots or green beans in place of potatoes. I just have to not get Italan at all. I also eat less rice, b Continue reading >>

A1c 1 | Diabetic Connect

A1c 1 | Diabetic Connect

Hey Brandijean, it's nice to meet you. I am glad you are part of our supportive community. Sorry to hear about that a1c your received. I am glad you are working with a diabetes specialist, and getting guidance on how to take better care of yourself. You are part of a community of people who really understand diabetes because they are walking the same road with you. I hope you are getting lots of support. Lowering stress, having someone to talk to, doing things you enjoy... this all contributes to your overall wellness. Remember: body, mind, spirit. I hope you will stay in touch with us! Some of the recipes here are quite good. I love the low carb pancake one made with eggs and cream cheeses and flax seed meal. Have you counted the carbohydrate grams you now consume every day? This is a very good place to start. Everyone has their own "magic number" of carbs that work for them. There is no one right number for us all. We come is all shapes, sizes, ages and metabolisms. The right number is the one that will allow you to maintain an ideal body weight and better blood sugar levels. If your BG's are too high and weight loss is a goal, reduce your daily carb gram intake until you reach a level that gives you the results you want. The magic number for me is 110 to 115 total carb grams per day. Some people here eat more and others eat less. Read all the labels on the food that you buy and pay attention to the serving size as well. For foods without labels, get yourself a carb guide or app. "Calorie King" is a good one. I also use a digital nutrition scale that allows me to weigh my food, input the food code and it tells me the nutritional values for that food which include carb grams. I would recommend that you read Dr Richard Bernstein's "Diabetes Solution". That book opened Continue reading >>

A Computer Program, Directed By Clinicians For Outpatients, Which Re-adjusts Subcutaneous Multiple Daily Injections (mdi) Of Insulin, Achieves An Improvement Of 2.6 A1c% Points

A Computer Program, Directed By Clinicians For Outpatients, Which Re-adjusts Subcutaneous Multiple Daily Injections (mdi) Of Insulin, Achieves An Improvement Of 2.6 A1c% Points

A Computer Program, Directed by Clinicians for Outpatients, Which Re-adjusts Subcutaneous Multiple Daily Injections (MDI) of Insulin, Achieves an Improvement of 2.6 A1c% Points A Computer Program, Directed by Clinicians for Outpatients, Which Re-adjusts Subcutaneous Multiple Daily Injections (MDI) of Insulin, Achieves an Improvement of 2.6 A1c% Points PC Davidson,1 BW Bode,1 HR Hebblewhite,2 R Booth2 This study examines the performance of a computerized algorithm for adjusting subcutaneous basal-bolus MDI insulin regimens for outpatients. This algorithm determines the meal bolus for a meal by applying an adjustment to the previous days same-time meal bolus based upon the subsequent BG response. Basal doses are adjusted in a similar manner based upon the lower of pre-breakfast BG or any immediately preceding nighttime lower BG tested earlier on the same day. The patients reported their BGs by text-messaging, email, telephone or the TelcareTM real-time cell-based meter system. Adjusted dosing information was relayed to the patient. Glycemic Control: All the subjects were started on the Glucommander SubQ algorithm at the beginning of the study. The statistics followed a paired before-and-after design. Method 1: For patients treated for > 60 days, each patients pre-study A1c was compared to his/her post-study A1c. Method 2: For all patients, the mean of the last 12 BGs of each patient was converted to an A1c value using the ADA-approved correlation. This value was compared to the pre-study A1c. The BG readings below threshold were counted for thresholds of 40, 50, and 60 mg/dL. The patients with at least one BG < threshold were counted for 40, 50, and 60 mg/dL. Results for glycemic control were as follows. Method 1: For 21 patients treated for > 60 days, pre-study A1c was Continue reading >>

Coverage For 43 Y/o Female A1c 10.1?

Coverage For 43 Y/o Female A1c 10.1?

just got put on gabapentin 2 months ago for neuropathy monumental said no to standard, due to diabetes control and ht/wt just got put on gabapentin 2 months ago for neuropathy monumental said no to standard, due to diabetes control and ht/wt just got put on gabapentin 2 months ago for neuropathy monumental said no to standard, due to diabetes control and ht/wt They issue standard even though she has complications arising out of her diabetes in addition to insulin treatment? I called in a 44 FNT to UHL with similar medical history, and they approved her deluxe on the phone but when I sent it in they switched it to a Whole life because of something on the MIB. They wouldn't say what it was. It bumped the payment up from $67 to 97, with a 2 year waiting period. I was considering looking at Gerber, as I have been writing a few children's riders of late through UHL. Anybody know the pros and cons of Gerber? I called in a 44 FNT to UHL with similar medical history, and they approved her deluxe on the phone but when I sent it in they switched it to a Whole life because of something on the MIB. They wouldn't say what it was. It bumped the payment up from $67 to 97, with a 2 year waiting period. I was considering looking at Gerber, as I have been writing a few children's riders of late through UHL. Anybody know the pros and cons of Gerber? 60% comp. Paid as earned only. No chargeback due to cancelation like Vantis. Can't set draft date on app. What I do for that is just not put their bank acct info on the app and then call in to Gerber after the fact and add it once they app is approved. I called in a 44 FNT to UHL with similar medical history, and they approved her deluxe on the phone but when I sent it in they switched it to a Whole life because of something on the MIB. They Continue reading >>

Original Research Serum Glucose And Hemoglobin A1c Levels At Cancer Diagnosis And Disease Outcome

Original Research Serum Glucose And Hemoglobin A1c Levels At Cancer Diagnosis And Disease Outcome

Highlights • Many patients believe that glucose ‘feeds’ cancer and might affect disease outcome. • We evaluated the effect of glycaemic control on survival of cancer patients with DM. • Higher glucose and HbA1C levels were not associated with worse survival. • In patients treated with insulin, higher glucose was associated with better outcome. • These results do not justify tight glycaemic control following cancer diagnosis. Abstract Despite the lack of scientific data, many cancer patients hold the belief that glucose ‘feeds’ cancer and might affect disease outcome. We aimed to evaluate associations between glucose, hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), and survival among individuals with diabetes and diabetes associated cancers. Five retrospective cohort studies were conducted in a large population-representative database. The study population included all patients with diabetes and an incident diagnosis of colorectal, breast, bladder, pancreatic and prostate cancers. Exposure of interest was serum glucose or HbA1C levels within 6 months prior to cancer diagnosis. Cox regression model was used to calculate hazard-ratio (HR) and 95% confidence-interval (CI) for overall survival. Analyses were adjusted for cancer-specific confounders. A subgroup analysis was performed among insulin-treated patients. Study cohorts included 7916 individuals with incident cancers and concurrent diabetes. There was no association between HbA1C levels and overall survival in colorectal (HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.95–1.06), breast (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.95–1.11), bladder (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.86–1.01), pancreatic (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.94–1.02), or prostate (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.96–1.08) cancers. Among diabetes patients treated with insulin, there was increased survival with increasing serum glucose, Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Hba1c

Understanding Your Hba1c

You’ve heard about a diabetes test called a hemoglobin A1C. It’s sometimes shortened to HgbA1c or HbA1c or just A1C. Hopefully, you know what yours is. But do you know what it means and what to do with the information? Hemoglobin is what makes red blood cells red. It consists of several proteins wrapped around an iron-based molecule called heme. Heme attaches to oxygen and carries it to the cells. That’s why iron is important in our diets. We need iron to make heme to carry oxygen, so our cells can breathe. Glucose (sugar) molecules are also floating along in our blood. Glucose attaches itself to all kinds of proteins, including the hemoglobin in red blood cells (RBCs). When glucose levels are high, many more of them will attach. Hemoglobin coated with glucose is called “glycated” or “glycosylated” hemoglobin. Glycation (“sugar-coating”) may not harm an RBC, but it does tell us if the cell has encountered much glucose during its lifetime. The more glucose has been in the blood, the more RBCs will be glycated. This is what an HbA1c test measures. A1C isn’t measuring what your blood glucose level is at the moment. It measures how high glucose has been over the last two months or so. RBCs only live about 100–120 days in the bloodstream. Once they become glycated, they stay glycated for life, so the number of glycated RBCs (HbA1c) gives a good picture of how much glucose has been in the blood recently. The A1C test has several advantages over other tests such as a fasting blood sugar (FBS). You don’t have to fast for an A1C. It can be taken at any time of day. It doesn’t matter what you ate the day before or on the day of the test, because it’s not measuring your current sugar. Normally, between 4.2% and 5.6% of RBCs will be glycated. The America Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c And Mean Glucose In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes: Analysis Of Data From The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Continuous Glucose Monitoring Randomized Trial.

Hemoglobin A1c And Mean Glucose In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes: Analysis Of Data From The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Continuous Glucose Monitoring Randomized Trial.

Diabetes Care. 2011 Mar;34(3):540-4. doi: 10.2337/dc10-1054. Epub 2011 Jan 25. OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between mean sensor glucose concentrations and hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) values measured in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications laboratory at the University of Minnesota in a cohort of subjects with type 1 diabetes from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation continuous glucose monitoring randomized trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Near-continuous glucose sensor data ( 4 days/week) were collected for 3 months before a central laboratory-measured HbA(1c) was performed for 252 subjects aged 8-74 years, the majority of whom had stable HbA(1c) values (77% within 0.4% of the patient mean). RESULTS: The slope (95% CI) for mean sensor glucose concentration (area under the curve) versus a centrally measured HbA(1c) was 24.4 mg/dL (22.0-26.7) for each 1% change in HbA(1c), with an intercept of -16.2 mg/dL (-32.9 to 0.6). Although the slope did not vary with age or sex, there was substantial individual variability, with mean sensor glucose concentrations ranging from 128 to 187 mg/dL for an HbA(1c) of 6.9-7.1%. The root mean square of the errors between the actual mean sensor glucose concentration versus the value calculated using the regression equation was 14.3 mg/dL, whereas the median absolute difference was 10.1 mg/dL. CONCLUSIONS: There is substantial individual variability between the measured versus calculated mean glucose concentrations. Consequently, estimated average glucose concentrations calculated from measured HbA(1c) values should be used with caution. Continue reading >>

My Last A1c Test Came Back 10.1

My Last A1c Test Came Back 10.1

On 1700 mg of metformin and 10/5 glyxambi. 33 years of age and was diagnosed 5 years ago. Feeling down but not out. Friend Type 2 on metformin, glimiperide, and berberine Besides the meds what are you doing to bring it down? Change in diet? Exercise? What are you glucose meter readings? What are some typical meals? Such information might help us help you. An oral med is not going to do anything without some kind of modification of diet. Do you have an idea of how many grams of carbs you're eating a day? You may be able to lower that and lower your blood sugars, too. D.D. Family T2 1986, insulin 2000, Double 08, Omnipod 6/12 You told us what drugs your using to lower your BG. You did not tell us what you do to raise your BG (eating carbohydrates raise BG) ALL carbohydrates (carbs) raise BG. eat less carbs have less BG rise. My carb intake daily is around 100 g. I stopped eating rice, bread, pasta and mostly anything with flour. I eat a lot of greens and veggies. My problems started when I went back to work. I started working overnight shifts, which didn't help. Then there were problems with my insurance and my meds werent covered for about a month and half. During that time I made 2 trips to the ER, my glucose had risen to over 500. I quit working overnight and got back on my daily medication. Things seem to have gotten better over the last week. When i was working overnight i didnt have the energy to work out and it became a viscous cycle. I never got adequate sleep and i was also working 50-55 hours a week. Now that im back on a normal sleep regimen I'm slowly getting back to form. I quit drinking soda and juice about 5 years ago and every now and then i will drink some Gatorade 2. for the most part i drink water. I usually have eggs for breakfast or some light and fi Continue reading >>

My Last A1c Test Came Back Exactly 10.1

My Last A1c Test Came Back Exactly 10.1

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community On 1700 mg of Metformin & 10/5 Glyxambi. At 30 years of age, I was diagnosed 6 years ago and I got to say, I'm feeling down a little bit but definitely not out. I will tag @daisy1 who will post a helpful guide for newcomers. Do ask questions and people will try and help/ There are lots of people on here who have found low carb really helpful I used a meter to test before and 2 hours after eating and found what foods I could eat and what I needed to avoid. What have your doctor or nurse advised? Any idea why after 6 years your levels have started to rise have you been poorly or had a lot of stress lately so many things can cause a rise in BG levels I suspect that the Linagliptin element of the Glyxambi isn't working as well as it once did. Following a low carb diet would help address this. There's a low carb program here attached to this forum. www.diabetes.co.uk/lowcarb It's also possiblke that you aren't T2 at all. You could be LADA/T1.5 Has your doctor done any further tests recently to check this? I'm tagging @Daibell who knows more about this than me. Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will be able to help. Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist. A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. Its far from the end of the world though and on this forum youll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this. On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being ab Continue reading >>

A1c Just Came Back At 10.1-gotta Get This Down Without Meds!

A1c Just Came Back At 10.1-gotta Get This Down Without Meds!

The Newcastle study contends that losing fat (in liver and pancreas) can reverse diabetes. Has worked for me. I started out on 2000 mg of metformin daily and BG similar to yours. After losing 10% of body weight my HbA1C was much improved and got the green light from my GP to start experimenting with reducing metformin. Got down to a single 500 mg tablet every other day, while keeping my HbA1C are 4.9. Was told to stop medicating altogether a few months ago. Diets that focus on lean proteins, veggies and healthy fats (olive oil, nuts, avocados) with limited whole grains and fruits have been shown to have the best longevity (people stick to them at a higher rate than other diets), as well as the most consistent results for diabetics. The best ways are to eat a low-carb diet (30-45g carbs for meals, 15-20 for snack), exercise (at least 30 minutes a day), and lose weight. I am a type 1 and found that losing weight and eating a low carb diet increased my insulin sensitivity and allowed me to take less mealtime insulin. I concur with the other posters. Ask to meet with a dietician as soon as possible. They can help you develop a meal plan. Protein, non-starchy veggies, lower fat dairy and healthy fats are important. For carbs, focus on complex carbs such as whole grains, while reducing simple ones. You can change the mfp macros for carbs to help you track them better. For the carbs you do eat, you want to spread them out evenly throughout the day to create less blood sugar spike. Having some protein with your carbs slows digestion and helps reduce spikes as well. Be careful with fruits, as some are quite high in carbs even though one would consider them a healthy option. I think everyone else's advice is very good. I wanted to add: Pay close attention how your body reacts to Continue reading >>

Exceeding All Expectations: A 7.1 Drop In A1c In 4 Months

Exceeding All Expectations: A 7.1 Drop In A1c In 4 Months

As a mission-driven entrepreneur and angel investor I am always trying to use the products of the companies I work with and their advice. I hadn’t anticipated getting diabetes when I first started working with John Moore and Frank Moss as they started Twine Health, but last Spring I had a unique opportunity to become a user of Twine and it literally saved my life. Diabetes is a huge problem as we all know - there are an estimated 350 million people living with this condition globally and every 7 seconds one person dies as a result of it. In mid-February of this year my son, Jonah, convinced me to stop drinking diet coke. I had a serious habit of drinking 2+ liters per day. The first week after Jonah and I stopped drinking diet coke I felt like I was losing weight. I started measuring my weight daily and was consistently losing about 1 lb every 2 - 3 days. Over the course of 8 weeks, I had lost 30 lbs and remarkably hadn’t changed my eating habits AT ALL. I was eating anything I wanted in any quantity I craved. I figured that the stars had aligned - similar to my friends with high metabolism, I could finally indulge my love for food without consequence. (I know, right?!) In April, I was in DC visiting my buddies Peter Barris and Harry Weller at New Enterprise Associates and wasn’t feeling quite right. My wife, Amy, suggested my unease might be related to blood sugar and recommended I pick up a glucometer just to check my level. First reading: 430. OK, so what is normal? I started searching online and turns out normal is 100! Alright, so now I have my first indication that something is rotten. I make a quick call to my primary care physician (PCP) and she tells me I need to go to the Emergency Room (ER) immediately, so of course I got on a plane and flew back to Bos Continue reading >>

The Only Diet Plan You’ll Need To Reverse Diabetes Ii And Drop 8 Pant Sizes Like I Did

The Only Diet Plan You’ll Need To Reverse Diabetes Ii And Drop 8 Pant Sizes Like I Did

Save A few years ago, Tiffany received an unexpected diagnosis of type II diabetes. When drugs led to unpleasant side effects, she adopted a different approach to managing the disease—with food! Tiffany went from an A1C of 10% to 5.8% in 6 months and has been able to keep it stabilized by radically changing her diet. Read about her incredible diet journey below! When I was first diagnosed with type II diabetes two years ago, my blood sugar and A1C levels were off the charts. My blood sugar were around 400 mg/dL and my A1C levels were at 10.1% (v.s 4% for normal). The doctors started me on Metformin, but the side effects made me feel terrible. After doing some research on my own, I decided to modify my diet as a way of managing my disease. I worked with my doctor, Dr. Shaffer, and a nutritionist to create a diet – which was composed of a “Phase One- Strict Detox Plan” and a “Phase Two- Maintenance Plan” to reverse my diabetes, without meds. The results of this diet transformation were astounding– today I have dropped 8 pant sizes, and have fully reversed my diabetes by simply eating well! It takes a lot of discipline at first. But if you stick with it, you’ll find both a rhythm and a diet that work for you. I found that it took about 6 months on the strict Phase One diet to get my A1C to normal levels, and I’ve been able to maintain it for over 2 years now. Here, I share the specific food lists and how-to-guide on the diet I used to reverse my diabetes. I hope it provides you ideas and inspiration! Phase One (My Detox Diet) Each day, I ate three main meals and two snacks–one mid-morning one mid-afternoon. Sticking to a meal schedule, and 5 small meals a day helped me manage my blood sugar levels throughout the day. For a typical breakfast, I ate one c Continue reading >>

Week 8 – 1st “non-diabetic” A1c On Afrezza After 3 Mos. – 10.1 To 5.7!

Week 8 – 1st “non-diabetic” A1c On Afrezza After 3 Mos. – 10.1 To 5.7!

At week 8, happy to announce we now have 8 Afrezza users in our “Real Life” User Group, and want to welcome Howard (@Afrezzaguy) to the Group, and will introduce you to his story and his Afrezza journey in an upcoming blog. Moreover, I’m also excited to let you know that every single one of us have achieved A1C Correlation levels this week in the 5’s— further proof of the superior power and effectiveness of Afrezza. Further confirming that news is Brian Sharp who had a doctors appointment, and he measured an A1C personal best at his doctors office of a 5.7 (yes, a non-diabetic number) using Afrezza for just 3 months! Ta-Dah! You did it Brian–first person on Afrezza we know of to achieve this! Another big “Shout Out” goes to Jackie–she had her doctors appointment and also achieved a new A1C personal record of 6.7 (her previous best was 8.1 over the last 16 years) in only 72 days using Afrezza. We are all excited for both of them knowing their numbers will continue to improve over the next 1-2 months. Brian’s A1C before Afrezza was 10.1. and Jackie’s was 9.1 and this achievement is continued proof that Afrezza is a “Life-Changer”! It has been an honor and privilege for our group to have them give us their feedback and also be encouraged by them on a daily basis. I know we all applaud you Brian and Jackie–the world needs to know how well Afrezza works, and for all diabetics to have Afrezza as an option in their diabetes treatment. Your outstanding and unbelievable results will certainly help gather awareness, hope and excitement in the diabetic community. I did catch up with Brian Sharp after his doctor’s appointment, and this is what he had to say: How did you feel when you got the news your A1C was 5.7? I felt awesome! To have the lowest A1C Continue reading >>

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