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A Person Whose Fasting Blood Sugar Was 129 Would Be Categorized As Having:

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

My Family History of Diabetes Diabetes has been in my family for generations. My grandmother was a diabetic, my father is diabetic, and during my pregnancy I almost developed prenatal diabetes. Given my family history and my own personal experience, I've learned a lot about this condition over the years. It turns out that there are many things we can do to control our blood sugar though the foods we eat. Normal Blood Glucose Levels What are normal blood glucose levels? Before meals: 80-90 mg/dL After meals: Up to 120 mg/dL Keep in mind that the blood glucose level before a meal for a non-diabetic and a prediabetic person may be very similar. As you can see in the graph below, how your blood sugar fluctuates after eating a meal can be more telling than your pre-meal glucose levels. However, if your pre-meal glucose level is over 100 mg/dL, you should see a doctor. A fasting glucose level of 126 mg/dL is considered diabetic. In this article, you will learn about the progression of Type 2 diabetes and how you can reverse it. Understanding the Diagnosis If you are reading this, you probably have been told by your doctor that you have, or someone you care about has, diabetes or prediabetes. You may be surprised, shocked, or even scared. You wonder how and why this is happening. Basically, diabetes means that the level of glucose in your blood (or blood sugar) is too high. Everyone has glucose in his or her blood. We need it to provide energy for all the cells in our body. Having diabetes means you have more than you need, way above normal blood sugar levels. The diagnosis of diabetes is somewhat arbitrary and keeps changing over time. Some time ago, your fasting glucose levels had to be 140 mg/dL or higher to be considered diabetic. Today the official number is 126 mg/dL, an Continue reading >>

What You Don’t Know About Blood Sugar

What You Don’t Know About Blood Sugar

The most cherished benefit of Foundation membership is discovering something new in every Life Extension publication. Unlike typical health journals, we inform members about what they don’t know concerning medical findings that are overlooked by conventional and alternative doctors. In our relentless review of the scientific literature, we have uncovered data that calls into question what the safe range of blood sugar really is. Current guidelines state that a person is diabetic if fasting blood glucose levels exceed 126 mg/dL on two consecutive occasions. Fasting glucose levels over 109 are flagged as potential prediabetic (glucose intolerant) states. Life Extension has long argued that optimal glucose ranges are less than 100. In a new hypothesis that shakes the pillars of conventional wisdom, it now appears that optimal fasting blood glucose levels should probably be under 86 mg/dL. This means that those with high “normal” glucose (86-109) are at an increased risk of premature death. While the medical establishment clearly understands the lethal dangers of hyperglycemia (blood sugar over 126), they have yet to recognize that even high normal glucose levels pose a serious threat to one’s health. Conventional Medicine’s Interpretation Of Fasting Glucose Blood Tests 70-109 mg/dL . . . . . . . . .Normal glucose tolerance 110-125 mg/dL. . . . . . . . .Impaired fasting glucose (prediabetes) 126+ mg/dL . . . . . . . . .Probable diabetes Life Extension’s Fasting Glucose Guidelines 70-85 mg/dL . . . . . . . . . Optimal (no glucose intolerance) 86-99 mg/dL . . . . . . . . . Borderline impaired fasting glucose 100+ mg/dL . . . . . . . . . .Probable prediabetes Why “Normal” Glucose Levels Are Dangerous To support our hypothesis that higher“normal” ranges of b Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Below chart displays possible blood sugar levels (in fasting state). Units are expressed in mg/dL and mmol/L respectively. Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes You can also download or print this chart by clicking here. Reference: American Diabetes Association, Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? What is normal blood sugar level? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Reading 129?

Blood Sugar Reading 129?

Hi All, I was pretty concerned what happened to me two nights ago. I ate a pint of Ben and Jerrys and felt wierd for a couple of hours, slightly dizzy or sleepy. I then asked my buddy on what to do next and he asked me to check my sugar levels. The next morning I bought a meter and checked it myself and... show more Hi All, I was pretty concerned what happened to me two nights ago. I ate a pint of Ben and Jerrys and felt wierd for a couple of hours, slightly dizzy or sleepy. I then asked my buddy on what to do next and he asked me to check my sugar levels. The next morning I bought a meter and checked it myself and showed a 89 mg, After dinner, it shot up to 148 when I checked it after 20 mins of dinner. However, after breakfast, an hour after meal, it was 109. normally it is between 90 and 100. Update: Is the dizziness a sign? I remember having a lot of sodas, ice creams for the last three days before the little dizziness incident. Update 2: Oh my God, getting nervous already, after the day I bought the monitor, I changed my diet to complete veggies and fish, I need a change. I hope everything is ok , feel normal now. Are you sure you want to delete this answer? A normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a normal person will see right before a meal) is: Many normal people have fasting blood sugars in the mid and high 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L) range. Though most doctors will tell you any fasting blood sugar under 100 mg/dl (5.6 mmol/L) is "normal", there are several studies that suggest that testing with a fasting blood sugar in the mid 90 mg/dl (5 mmol/L) range often predicts diabetes that is diagnosed a decade later. Independent of what they eat, the blood sugar of a truly normal person is: Under 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L) one or two hours after a meal. Most Continue reading >>

Top 6 Health Numbers To Know After Age 40

Top 6 Health Numbers To Know After Age 40

When you reach 40 you need to keep track of 6 important personal health numbers: Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, Cholesterol, Blood Sugar, CRP, Waist Size. Hitting 40? What are the numbers you need to track to stay healthy and on top of things? Anyone in their mid-30s or younger is probably not reading this post. It’s only when the big FOUR-OH milestone is approaching that you find yourself reading articles and fretting that you’re reaching a turning point in life. Is it the end of the beginning or the beginning of the end? At the very least 40 heralds some noticable physical changes; a few more gray hairs, the need for reading glasses and the start of wrinkles around the eyes. The mirror can tell you how many gray hairs have crept onto your cranium. But those are the numbers you should track to stay looking and feeling young. Dye the doo if you wish, but don’t ignore the real health indicators – those affecting your heart. Top 6 Health Numbers To Know After 40 The following six measurements are the main numbers to watch as you reach your big Four Zero. 1) Blood Pressure This number should top your priority list. It is the best indicator of how well your heart is functioning. Your arteries carry blood throughout your body. The pressure in your arteries as the blood flows through them is your blood pressure. It is measured and shown in two numbers. The first number is the amount of pressure present when your heart beats, pushing the blood through the arteries. This is your systolic blood pressure. The second number measures the pressure when your heart relaxes between beats. This is your diastolic blood pressure. Both are measured in mmHg (millimeters of mercury.) For example, 120/80mmHg. This reading is commonly stated as “120 over 80.” This is one area where we Continue reading >>

When To Test? A New Study Pinpoints Timing

When To Test? A New Study Pinpoints Timing

One of the most common questions people email me is when exactly they should start measuring the "hour after eating" at which I suggest they should test their blood sugar. Does that hour start after the first bite or at the end of the meal? Luckily for us, an obscure paper published last year give us a definitive answer. Luckily for me, that answer is identical to the advice I've been giving people who have asked me this question for the last five years. (I based my answer on a previous study and the reports of people posting about when they tested on online discussion groups.) The study used used data collected from people with both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, using insulin, who were wearing continuous glucose monitors. You can read it here: Peak-time determination of post-meal glucose excursions in insulin-treated diabetic patients. Daenen S, et al. Diabetes Metab. 2010 Apr;36(2):165-9. Epub 2010 Mar 11. For insight into why this study is so useful you have to keep in mind that the whole point of testing at one hour is to find the highest blood sugar reading after the meal. This study found that the average blood sugar peak after breakfast was found at 72 minutes after the start of the meal, with most people's values falling between 49 minutes and 95 minutes. However, one person in five saw a peak after 90 minutes from the start of the meal. The researchers observe that "Peak time correlated with the amplitude of postprandial excursions, but not with the peak glucose value." I.e. A rise of 100 mg/dl to 170 mg/dl from a starting value of 70 mg/dl would take longer than a rise of 30 mg/dl from 140 g/dl to that same 170 mg/dl, which makes sense. Since many of us spend about 15 minutes eating a meal, this explains why many people will do just fine if they test hour after Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

Thank you for visiting my website! If you need help lowering your blood sugar level, check out my books at Amazon or Smashwords. If you’re outside of the U.S., Smashwords may be the best source. —Steve Parker, M.D. * * * Physicians focus so much on disease that we sometimes lose sight of what’s healthy and normal. For instance, the American Diabetes Association defines “tight” control of diabetes to include sugar levels as high as 179 mg/dl (9.94 mmol/l) when measured two hours after a meal. In contrast, young adults without diabetes two hours after a meal are usually in the range of 90 to 110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l). What Is a Normal Blood Sugar Level? The following numbers refer to average blood sugar (glucose) levels in venous plasma, as measured in a lab. Portable home glucose meters measure sugar in capillary whole blood. Many, but not all, meters in 2010 are calibrated to compare directly to venous plasma levels. Fasting blood sugar after a night of sleep and before breakfast: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 110 mg/dl (6.11 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 95 mg/dl (5.28 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) (The aforementioned meal derives 50–55% of its energy from carbohydrate) ♦ ♦ ♦ Ranges of blood sugar for young healthy non-diabetic adults: Fasting blood sugar: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) One hour after a typical meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.94 mmol/l) Two hours after a typical meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l) Five hours after a typical meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) Blood sugars tend to be a bit lower in pregnant women. ♦ ♦ ♦ What Level of Blood Sugar Defines Diabetes and Prediabetes? According to the 2007 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinol Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 129 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 129 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

To improve your blood sugar fasting you need to lower your blood glucose level by 29mg/dl. Your fasting blood sugar level should always be below 100mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. Blood sugar testing measures how much glucose is in the bloodstream. No matter what is eaten, from a small snack to a large meal, blood glucose values rise in response to any carbohydrates that are digested. In a healthy person, the pancreas reacts to the higher blood glucose by releasing insulin, a hormone that converts blood sugar into usable energy. In addition to carbohydrates, other body processes also raise blood sugar levels.When a person fasts, which is defined medically as not eating or drinking anything aside from water for at least eight hours, the release of glucagon is triggered in the body. Glucagon instructs the liver to metabolize reserve supplies of glycogen, which are then circulated into the bloodstream as sugars. Accordingly, the amount of plasma glucose goes up. This is how the body creates energy even while fasting. In sum, when diabetes is not present the body responds to all blood sugars by manufacturing insulin in proportion with the glucose level. When it comes to fasting blood sugars, insulin lowers and stabilizes the levels so that they remain in a normal, healthy range. Yet when any form of diabetes is present, either pre-diabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, the whole physiological process doesnt work correctly, and blood sugars are often considerably higher than normal. The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) is commonly used to detect the existence of diabetes. In order to prepare for a fasting blood sugar test, one must refrain from eating or drinking from eight to twelve hours before the test, depending upon the doctors instructions. It is conducted in t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Your health care professional can diagnose diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes through blood tests. The blood tests show if your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Do not try to diagnose yourself if you think you might have diabetes. Testing equipment that you can buy over the counter, such as a blood glucose meter, cannot diagnose diabetes. Who should be tested for diabetes? Anyone who has symptoms of diabetes should be tested for the disease. Some people will not have any symptoms but may have risk factors for diabetes and need to be tested. Testing allows health care professionals to find diabetes sooner and work with their patients to manage diabetes and prevent complications. Testing also allows health care professionals to find prediabetes. Making lifestyle changes to lose a modest amount of weight if you are overweight may help you delay or prevent type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Most often, testing for occurs in people with diabetes symptoms. Doctors usually diagnose type 1 diabetes in children and young adults. Because type 1 diabetes can run in families, a study called TrialNet offers free testing to family members of people with the disease, even if they don’t have symptoms. Type 2 diabetes Experts recommend routine testing for type 2 diabetes if you are age 45 or older are between the ages of 19 and 44, are overweight or obese, and have one or more other diabetes risk factors are a woman who had gestational diabetes1 Medicare covers the cost of diabetes tests for people with certain risk factors for diabetes. If you have Medicare, find out if you qualify for coverage . If you have different insurance, ask your insurance company if it covers diabetes tests. Though type 2 diabetes most often develops in adults, children also ca Continue reading >>

What Are Blood Sugar Target Ranges? What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level?

What Are Blood Sugar Target Ranges? What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level?

Understanding blood sugar target ranges to better manage your diabetes As a person with diabetes, you may or may not know what your target ranges should be for your blood sugars first thing in the morning, before meals, after meals, or at bedtime. You may or may not understand what blood sugar ranges are for people without diabetes. You may or may not understand how your A1C correlates with your target ranges. How do you get a clear picture of what is going on with your blood sugar, and how it could be affecting your health? In this article, we will look at what recommended blood sugar target ranges are for people without diabetes. We will look at target ranges for different times of the day for people with diabetes. We will look at target ranges for Type 1 versus Type 2 diabetes. Is there a difference? We will also look at what blood sugars should be during pregnancy for those with gestational diabetes. We will look at other factors when determining blood sugar targets, such as: Age Other health conditions How long you’ve had diabetes for Stress Illness Lifestyle habits and activity levels We will see how these factors impact target ranges for your blood sugars when you have diabetes. We will learn that target ranges can be individualized based on the factors above. We will learn how target ranges help to predict the A1C levels. We will see how if you are in your target range, you can be pretty sure that your A1C will also be in target. We will see how you can document your blood sugar patterns in a notebook or in an “app,” and manage your blood sugars to get them in your target ranges. First, let’s look at the units by which blood sugars are measured… How is blood sugar measured? In the United States, blood sugar is measured in milligrams per deciliter (by w Continue reading >>

Exam 1 Solutions €“ Math 263 (sect 9) €“ Prof. Kennedy

Exam 1 Solutions €“ Math 263 (sect 9) €“ Prof. Kennedy

20 32 30 28 100 1. For 219 hospital patients the length of their stay in the hospital (in days) was recorded. A histogram is show above. a. The median is approximately A) 10.0 B ) 3.2 C) 2.0 D) 5.1 b. The mean is approximately c. The IQR (interquartile range) is approximately A) 0.5 B ) 3.1 C) 5.2 D) 19 d. The 80th percentile is approximately A) 3.2 B ) 5.0 C) 7.3 D) 15 2. Assume that blood-glucose levels in a population of adult women are normally distributed with mean 90 mg/dL and standard deviation 38 mg/dL. a. Use the standard normal distribution to determine what percentage of the population has a level above 80 mg/dL Solution: Z=(80-90)/38= -0.263158 From table or calculator, probability below this is 0.39627. So answer is 1-0.39627=0.6037=60.37% b. The 90th percentile for glucose levels is the level such that 90% of the population has a glucose level lower than the 90th percentile. Find the 90th percentile for glucose levels. Solution:From table or calculator the 90th percentile for standard normal distribution is at z=1.2816. So answer is 90 + 1.2816*38 mg/dL =138.7 mg/dL c. Suppose that the “abnormal range†is defined to be glucose levels which are 1.5 standard deviations above the mean or 1.5 standard deviations below the mean. What percentage of individuals would be classified “abnormal?†Solution: This is same as asking what percentage of standard normal distribution is below z=-1.5 or above z=1.5. For standard normal the probability less than -1.5 is 0.0668. By the symmetry of the distribution the probability above 1.5 is the same. So answer is 2*0.0668=13.36%. d. Suppose we want to redefine the abnormal range to be more than c standard deviations above the mean or less than c standard deviations with c chosen so that 4 % of the populati Continue reading >>

Metformin And Insulin Resistance

Metformin And Insulin Resistance

About a year ago, my endocrinologist determined that I was exhibiting signs of insulin resistance. In short, my body requires more than the average amount of insulin to cover carbohydrate. She suggested that I start taking metformin, noting that it would do two things for me: It would decrease the amount of insulin I need to take and it would help curb my appetite, thus resulting in weight loss. When I first got on it, I thought it was great. My blood sugar levels improved, my appetite was in fact curbed, and all seemed wonderful — until I stopped taking my metformin. As a high school senior, I had atrocious sleeping habits! That, coupled with the fact that taking metformin was really killing my appetite, was causing me to become exhausted and get some pretty severe headaches. Looking back on it now, it’s very clear that the metformin wasn’t the problem, it was me. However, as a stubborn senior in high school, I was determined to maintain my sleeping habits, as I deemed them completely normal and in accordance with the typical behavior exhibited by my peers (boy, how I’ve changed…). So, I stopped the metformin. The last three weeks or so, I’ve been back on metformin regularly. I decided to start it up again after my last appointment with my CDE. Thus far, it’s really been working wonders and my blood sugars have decreased substantially! Where my 30-day average was hovering around 190 just a few weeks ago, it has now dropped to 137! I was seriously shocked when I saw how much my average fell. For the most part, my blood sugar levels are in range, but I have had my fair share of lows as well. Managing metformin really is a science that can change on a daily basis depending on my activity level. For example, the first two weeks that I was back on metformin, I Continue reading >>

12 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Whack

12 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Whack

Blood sugar, or glucose, is one of the best things Mother Nature ever provided us with. It’s one component of your body chemistry that helps you feel alive and happy. When glucose is at the right level, you’re likely to experience a great attitude, a strong immune system, low stress, and a good night’s sleep as well. But when blood sugar gets too high, then “crashes,” or falls very low, the effects can be devastating to bodily processes. For this reason, the body strives to maintain blood sugar levels within a narrow range through the coordinated efforts of several glands and their hormones. Understanding Blood Sugar Control After you eat a meal, the sugars in each of the foods you eat raises the level of sugar in your blood. The body responds by secreting insulin — a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers blood sugar levels by increasing the rate at which glucose is taken up by cells throughout the body. If you go too long without eating, or eat the wrong (read: “junk”) foods, or if your hormones are out of balance, your blood sugar will fall too low. When this happens, your adrenal glands will release adrenalin and cortisol in order to remedy the situation. At this point, you should eat food that will slowly and gradually raise your blood sugar levels again. Most of the time, eating three square meals a day keeps your blood sugar in balance. But when this process gets out of whack, you can find yourself on the blood sugar roller coaster, with no one at the brake switch. How do you know if you’re holding a ticket to this invisible junk food ride? 12 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Control 1. Your waist is larger than your hips. 2. You find it difficult to lose weight. 3. You crave sweets. 4. You feel infinitely better after you eat. 5. You Continue reading >>

Is 129 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Is 129 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Here we will look at a 129 mg/dL blood sugar level from a Glucose test result and tell you what it may mean. Is 129 mg/dL blood sugar good or bad? Note that blood sugar tests should be done multiple times and the 129 mg/dL blood sugar level should be an average of those numbers. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, there is a Fasting Glucose Test and a Random Glucose Test. Below you can see what different results may mean. Fasting Glucose Test 70 - 100 mg/dL = Normal 101 - 125 mg/dL = Prediabetes 126 and above = Diabetes Therefore, according to the chart above, if the 129 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Fasting Glucose Test, then it may indicate diabetes. Random Glucose Test Below 125 mg/dL = Normal 126 - 199 mg/dL = Prediabetes 200 and above = Diabetes If the test result of a 129 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Random Glucose Test, then the result would indicate it to be in the prediabetes range. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Is 130 mg/dL Blood Sugar from a Glucose test normal? Go here for the next blood sugar level on our list. Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Diabetes

Diagnosing Diabetes

In diagnosing diabetes, physicians primarily depend upon the results of specific glucose tests. However, test results are just part of the information that goes into the diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Doctors also take into account your physical exam, presence or absence of symptoms, and medical history. Some people who are significantly ill will have transient problems with elevated blood sugars, which will then return to normal after the illness has resolved. Also, some medications may alter your blood glucose levels (most commonly steroids and certain diuretics, such as water pills). The 2 main tests used to measure the presence of blood sugar problems are the direct measurement of glucose levels in the blood during an overnight fast and measurement of the body's ability to appropriately handle the excess sugar presented after drinking a high glucose drink. Fasting Blood Glucose (Blood Sugar) Level A value above 126 mg/dL on at least 2 occasions typically means a person has diabetes. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is one that can be performed in a doctor's office or a lab. The person being tested starts the test in a fasting state (having no food or drink except water for at least 10 hours but not greater than 16 hours). An initial blood sugar is drawn and then the person is given a "glucola" bottle with a high amount of sugar in it (75 grams of glucose or 100 grams for pregnant women). The person then has their blood tested again 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 3 hours after drinking the high glucose drink. For the test to give reliable results, you must be in good health (not have any other illnesses, not even a cold). Also, you should be normally active (for example, not lying down or confined to a bed like a patient in a Continue reading >>

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