diabetestalk.net

9.6 A1c

Got My A1c Back :(

Got My A1c Back :(

ive had type 1 diabetes for 2 years now, my first year my A1c was at 6.2-6.9 i did lab work yesterday i got my a1c its at 9.6!! i have mix emotions i i dont know how i should feel "if i should be mad at myself,depressed,?) i just the medtronic minimed pump yesterday i should be starting it next week,i count my carbs i dont eat more than 100 carbs a day my sugars have been running 100-250 i keep my sugars a lil high when im at work cuz i dont like going low when im working,has anyone ever had an a1c like this? i need words of inspiration from my Diabetes Family thank you We have all had this happen to us. Don't stress over it, it will just make your bgs go high. Instead, think of it as a learning experience and know that you need to make changes. I am sure things will get better once you start on the pump. Doctor's are happy, but I'm not. Working to get it a bit lower. An A1C at 9.6 is High, but what's the average Blood Sugar? They should tell you that as well. But regardless, an A1C that high, usually means that you aren't doing as well as you think you are. (My 20 year anniversary is in a few weeks, and I still get slapped with a High A1C once in a while) Never take a High A1C as "I'm a Horrible person, why do have to do this!" Take it more as a "What can I do better?" An A1c of 9.6 is equivalent to an average BG (over 60 to 90 days preceding) of 225. everyone i know that my A1c is supper high! im just llooking for advice and support thanks D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 possibly you could read Dr. R. Bernsteins: Diabetes solutions. He is a long standing type 1 with normal blood sugars. It's kinda hard to give advise with little info, BUT, I know where you are coming from. I wouldn't worry about going low while working, depending on what job I was in Continue reading >>

Translating A1c To A Blood Sugar Level

Translating A1c To A Blood Sugar Level

In the USA, doctors recommend that you have your Hemoglobin A1c measured at least twice per year. This simple blood test will tell you an approximation of your blood sugar control for the past 3 months based on the amount of Advanced Glycogenated End-Products (AGEs) that have accumulated in your blood. The higher your blood sugar levels are, the more AGEs are present. AGEs are also responsible for the development of complications such as retinopathy and neuropathy, because that accumulation will build and irritate crucial nerve-endings. To help people with diabetes understanding their A1C in real day-to-day terms, the medical world has developed the eAG measurement. Estimated Average Glucose.Your eAG will give your A1C reading in a blood sugar level of milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) just like youre used to seeing on your glucose meter. The American Diabetes Association has this easy calculator, allowing you to enter and translate your latest A1C to your eAG . What can you do with that information? It is recommended that people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes achieve an A1C of 7.0 percent or lower for optimal health, and the prevention of complications. This translates to an average blood sugar before and between meals around 70 to 130 mg/dL. And after meals, under 180 mg/dL. For pregnancy with diabetes, an A1C lower than 6.5 percent is imperative for the healthy development of your baby, and your own health and safety. Post-meal blood sugars for pregnant women is suggested at lower than 120 mg/dL. A non-diabetics A1C is typically around 5.0 percent. Adjust your medications!Talk to your doctor about your insulin doses or oral medications . If your A1C is higher than 7.0 percent, chances are your body needs more insulin at certain times of the day. This can be achieved Continue reading >>

David’s Guide To Getting Our A1c Under 6.0

David’s Guide To Getting Our A1c Under 6.0

The A1C test is our best scorecard to show how well we are controlling our diabetes. It measures how much glucose has been sticking to our red blood cells for the previous two or three months. Since our bodies replace each red blood cell with a new one every four months, this test tells us the average of how high our glucose levels have been during the life of the cells. The experts recommend that we should get our A1C level tested at least twice a year. People who take insulin need to get it about four times a year. If the test shows that our blood glucose level is high, it means that we have a greater risk of having diabetes problems. Think of the A1C as an early warning system for the insidious complications that we can get down the road when we don’t control our condition. But what do we mean by a “high” A1C level? Here the experts disagree. The American Diabetes Association says that we need to keep our A1C results below 7.0 percent. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists sets the target at 6.5 percent. The International Diabetes Federation, or IDF, also recommends that most people with diabetes keep their levels below 6.5 percent. The more our A1C level is higher than normal, the greater the likelihood that we will suffer from one or more of the complications of diabetes. And here too the experts disagree with how they define “normal.” People who don’t have diabetes have A1C levels below 6.0 percent. That’s the gist of what I wrote here recently in “The Normal A1C Level.” The IDF agrees. But more aggressive endocrinologists say that a truly normal A1C ranges from 4.2 percent to 4.6 percent. That’s what Dr. Richard K. Bernstein wrote in Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. No matter what our level is, we can be sure that lower is Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c definition and facts Hemoglobin A1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells that sugar molecules stick to, usually for the life of the red blood cell (about three months). The higher the level of glucose in the blood, the higher the level of hemoglobin A1c is detectable on red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1c levels correlate with average levels of glucose in the blood over an approximately three-month time period. Normal ranges for hemoglobin A1c in people without diabetes is about 4% to 5.9%. People with diabetes with poor glucose control have hemoglobin A1c levels above 7%. Hemoglobin A1c levels are routinely used to determine blood sugar control over time in people with diabetes. Decreasing hemoglobin A1c levels by 1% may decrease the risk of microvascular complications (for example, diabetic eye, nerve, or kidney disease) by 10%. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be checked, according to the American Diabetic Association, every six months in individuals with stable blood sugar control, and every three months if the person is trying to establish stable blood sugar control. Hemoglobin A1c has many other names such as glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and HbA1c. To explain what hemoglobin A1c is, think in simple terms. Sugar sticks to things, and when it has been stuck to something for a long time it's harder to the get sugar (glucose) off. In the body, sugar sticks too, particularly to proteins. The red blood cells that circulate in the body live for about three months before they die. When sugar (glucose) sticks to these red blood cells by binding to hemoglobin A1c, it gives us an idea of how much glucose has been around in the blood for the preceding three months. Hemoglobin A1c is a minor component of hemoglobin to which gl Continue reading >>

My Hba1c | Diabetic Connect

My Hba1c | Diabetic Connect

Hi Rachel, I know when I was 16 my hba1c was constantly over 10%, actually at one point I was making myself seriously ill and my hba1c was 13%. I was having trouble getting my blood sugars under control due to hormones and I just gave up! I was sick of eating well and feeling like a failure so I ate bad foods and didn't take my meds on purpose. Now at 21 I have diabetic neuropathy and have recently had to give up work as my feet and legs are extremely painful. Please get the help from your diabetic team! I wish I had someone to tell me when I was younger, don't give up!! You may feel like your in constant battle with your own body but just think how strong you are! my advice at the moment to you is test, test, test!! Do your blood sugars every 2hrs. Do what you would normally do, for example if you usually have a snack at 11am without taking any insulin, do your blood sugars 2 hrs after and you may find you need a tiny bit of insulin to cover it. Also check your sugars during the night, you sleep for a third of a whole day (8hrs) so it's ideal to make sure your sugars are good!! Regarding your low carb diet, I would start eating slow releasing carbs, things like whole grain bread, porridge etc these helped my blood sugars stay level and stopped the rapid rise and fall which made me feel really ill. Considering the amount of exercise you do, you should be enjoying eating carbs!! :) Ask your diabetic team for help, if you can talk with a dietician. remember every one is different and what works for one diabetic won't work for another, little changes can make a big difference! Good luck :) x I think your problem is that you are viewing diabetes as a struggle. When you view things as a struggle they will become one. I think you may have to look at what your are doing. Talk Continue reading >>

Success Story: Don Fillenworth

Success Story: Don Fillenworth

Name: Don Fillenworth, age 55 Location: Bismarck, N.D. In mid-October 2012, I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and had an A1C of 9.6. This was quite a shock for me, as there is no history of diabetes in my family. Before I was diagnosed, my feet were constantly numb and tingling, and I was losing feeling in the front portion of the bottom of both my feet. I had no clue that this was an indicator of diabetes, as I was not familiar with the disease at the time. My doctor prescribed metformin, which I take twice a day, and referred me to a diabetes educator and nutritionist at our local medical center. My cholesterol and blood pressure levels were also really high, but I was already on medications for both. My wife accompanied me to the diabetes education and nutrition courses. The courses were very educational and informative! We both were amazed at the amount of information we received. The lifestyle changes were pretty aggressive, including major diet changes as well as exercise. Fortunately, my wife is so dedicated and helpful! Though she didn’t have to, Cindy committed to the same diet changes, as well as to starting a walking routine with me. Originally, my goal was to walk about one-and-a-half miles a day. Within a month, though, we were walking five to six miles a day during our lunch and dinner times. In January, I received the results from a follow-up doctor’s visit and blood screening. In three short months, I have lowered my A1C level to 5.9! My blood pressure and cholesterol levels have decreased greatly and are now in normal ranges. I have also dropped more than 20 pounds and my feet no longer tingle. I feel great! Even my doctor was amazed at my dedication and progress. I don’t consider being diagnosed with diabetes as a bad thing at all. It gave me Continue reading >>

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

The A1C blood test is a simple test that analyzes your glucose (blood sugar) levels by measuring the amount of glycated hemoglobin in your blood. Hemoglobin is a protein in your red blood cells; when glucose enters the blood, it attaches to the hemoglobin. The result is glycated hemoglobin. The more glucose in your blood, the higher your glycated hemoglobin. The A1C is a valuable indicator of how well your diabetes management plan is working. While your individual A1C goal will depend on factors including your age and your personal medical profile, most people with diabetes aim to keep their A1C below 7 percent. By keeping your A1C number within your target range, you can reduce the risk of diabetes complications. While it is important to develop a long-term diabetes management plan with your physician, there are several steps you can take right away to help reduce your A1C. Small changes add up, so consider trying some of these strategies to lower your A1C this week. 1. Try Short Sessions of High Intensity Exercise According to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2015, type 2 diabetes patients who did 10 minutes of exercise three times a day, five days a week at 85 percent of their target heart rate had a twofold improvement in A1C levels compared to patients who exercised for 30 minutes a day at 65 percent of their target heart rate. Be sure to check with your doctor before trying high intensity exercise, and wear a heart rate monitor so you don’t overdo it. 2. Shrink Your Dinner Plate Instead of a large dinner plate for your meals, use a smaller salad plate. This simple swap can trick your eyes and brain into thinking you’re eating more than you really are, and you’ll feel satisfied with less food. It’s especially helpfu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Simplified: A1c Testing

Diabetes Simplified: A1c Testing

By Wil Dubois “Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who’s the best-controlled of all?” —what the Wicked Queen would have asked if she’d had diabetes instead of vanity issues If you’ve had diabetes for any time at all, you’ve probably heard of the A1C test. Sometimes, it’s also called the HbA1c test, the Hemoglobin A1c test, or the glycated hemoglobin test. They’re all the same thing. This is a lab test that allows your doctor, by consulting with a magic mirror, to determine how well your diabetes has been controlled, night and day, for the last three months. If that’s not black magic, I don’t know what is. Of course, as sci-fi writer Arthur C. Clarke famously said, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” The A1C has become the widely accepted benchmark for diabetes control. It’s used to classify who is in control and who is not, and to quantify the risk levels of those not in-target. The higher the A1C, the greater the risk of complications. The A1C is now also used diagnostically, with A1C scores actually used to diagnose new-onset diabetes. The A1C Test: How Does It Work? Well, like I said, it’s magic: in this case, the magic of biochemistry. The test measures the average blood sugar level for the past three months. It can do this because glucose sticks to red blood cells, just like powdered sugar sticks to freshly-fried doughnut holes. The result of the test is expressed as a percentage: 6.2 percent…7.8 percent…8.3 percent…9.6 percent…12.4 percent…and so on. Most A1C scores are only expressed in tenths of a percent, but some labs report twentieths, as well, so you might see an A1C of 6.79 percent or 8.32 percent. Wait a sec. A percentage of what, exactly? The percentage of hemoglobin in the sample of red Continue reading >>

The Dreaded Report Card

The Dreaded Report Card

Every three months, we go to the doctor’s office or lab to find out our A1c. For some of us, we are excited to see if our hard work has paid off, and others know that all those holiday treats are going to cause a disappointment. We are emotionally attached to this number every quarter, and it can really make or break a visit. Personally, I can’t even start the conversation with my endocrinologist until I know that result. But, what’s in an A1c? The Glycosylated Hemoglobin, Hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c, or just “A1c” to those of us “in the biz,” is a test to measure roughly the average of what your blood glucose has been over the last three months. Roughly being the key here. A blood cell life span is approximately 120 days, or three months. So every blood cell in your body lives for only about three months before it is recycled and turned into new things. During that three-month period the cell can change; in particular, glucose will stick to it. The A1c is a measurement of how much glucose has stuck to that cell (then averaged with many, many cells in the sample). You do not need to be fasting for this test, it does not matter what medications you have taken that day, your current blood glucose will not affect your A1c, and this can be done with a fingerstick or with a lab draw. Another thing to think about is the difference between fingerstick A1c and lab draw A1c. Lab draws every three months will get old quickly (it also takes longer, is more painful, and unrealistic for children). We are fortunate to be able to check an A1c efficiently with just a fingerstick, but how is the accuracy? Labs should be keeping up with the controls, which means checking accuracy, very frequently compared to venipuncture (the arm blood draw) to ensure that the fingerstick is with Continue reading >>

The A1c Test & Diabetes

The A1c Test & Diabetes

What is the A1C test? The A1C test is a blood test that provides information about a person’s average levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar, over the past 3 months. The A1C test is sometimes called the hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c, or glycohemoglobin test. The A1C test is the primary test used for diabetes management and diabetes research. How does the A1C test work? The A1C test is based on the attachment of glucose to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. In the body, red blood cells are constantly forming and dying, but typically they live for about 3 months. Thus, the A1C test reflects the average of a person’s blood glucose levels over the past 3 months. The A1C test result is reported as a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher a person’s blood glucose levels have been. A normal A1C level is below 5.7 percent. Can the A1C test be used to diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Yes. In 2009, an international expert committee recommended the A1C test as one of the tests available to help diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes.1 Previously, only the traditional blood glucose tests were used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes. Because the A1C test does not require fasting and blood can be drawn for the test at any time of day, experts are hoping its convenience will allow more people to get tested—thus, decreasing the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes. However, some medical organizations continue to recommend using blood glucose tests for diagnosis. Why should a person be tested for diabetes? Testing is especially important because early in the disease diabetes has no symptoms. Although no test is perfect, the A1C and blood glucose tests are the best tools available to diagnose diabetes—a serious and li Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin Abnormalities And A1c Testing

Hemoglobin Abnormalities And A1c Testing

I recently saw a patient for a diabetes follow-up and had just gotten her lab values faxed over. Her A1c came back at 9.6 despite the patient telling me that her glucose meter readings were much lower. She even showed me the meter and upon doing some averaging, it appeared that her A1c should be a lot lower. My first thought was a faulty meter and so immediately we gave her another one but upon first use in the office the glucose readings on each were 122 mg/dl and 128 mg/dl respectively. I had her use the new meter for 7 days and return. The readings on the meter indicated that her A1c should be in the 7.6 range…. Upon further investigation we found that the patient had the sickle cell trait hemoglobin variant. The endocrinologist in the office explained that this and other blood anemias can cause falsely elevated A1c readings, depending on the testing device the labs use. Sheryl K., RN, CDE Editors note: Blood disorders that affect A1c values are more common than we may think. These disorders can include sickle cell trait, thalassemia, and some forms of anemia. Most people who are heterozygous — having one variant gene and one standard hemoglobin gene — for a hemoglobin variant have no symptoms and may not know that they carry this type of hemoglobin. Health care providers should suspect the presence of a hemoglobinopathy when: an A1C result is different than expected an A1C result is above 15 percent results of self-monitoring of blood glucose have a low correlation with A1C results a patient’s A1C result is radically different from a previous A1C result following a change in laboratory A1C methods According to the NGSP — The hemoglobin A1C (A1C) test can be unreliable for diagnosing or monitoring diabetes and prediabetes in people with inherited hemoglobin Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

My A1c Level Is 9.6 What Does This Mean? | Yahoo Answers

My A1c Level Is 9.6 What Does This Mean? | Yahoo Answers

Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Thta means that your AVERAGE blood sugar level is about 230. For a NORMAL person, the average reading should be 100. An A1C reading of 9.6 means that you average blood sugar level is more than twice as high as it needs to be. you are SEVERELY diabetic, and need to make changes NOW -- including ASKING the doctor to put you on insulin until you can get your diet and exercise working correctly. As it stand, you are in grave danger, and have probably already made some non-reversible changes to your eyes, heart, kidneys, and brain. if you don;t get this number lower ASAP, you stand a chance of going blind, having a heart attack, or havong a stroke. The A1C is a measurement of your average blood glucose for the past 2-3 months, which is different from glucometer measures of blood glucose which give a glucose reading for that particular moment in time. Therefore, A1C is a much more accurate marker of how well controlled your diabetes is overall. Generally, if your A1C is at goal (<7%) and stable, then you will only need to have this level checked twice a year. However, if your A1C is not at goal, then your diabetes may not be well controlled and A1C levels should be repeated at least quarterly to help reassess your diabetes and guide treatment changes. In your case, an A1C of 9.6 correlates with a 2-3 month average blood glucose of approximately 225 mg/dL. According to the ADA guidelines, the target for A1C is <7%, which correlates with an average blood glucose of <154 mg/dL. It is important to discuss your specific treatment goals with your physician and speak with your pharmacist is you have any questions about medications you may be given to help decrease your blood glucose and A1C. It is important to remember though that there Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c, often abbreviated HbA1c, is a form of hemoglobin (a blood pigment that carries oxygen) that is bound to glucose. The blood test for HbA1c level is routinely performed in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Blood HbA1c levels are reflective of how well diabetes is controlled. The normal range for level for hemoglobin A1c is less than 6%. HbA1c also is known as glycosylated, or glycated hemoglobin. HbA1c levels are reflective of blood glucose levels over the past six to eight weeks and do not reflect daily ups and downs of blood glucose. High HbA1c levels indicate poorer control of diabetes than levels in the normal range. HbA1c is typically measured to determine how well a type 1 or type 2 diabetes treatment plan (including medications, exercise, or dietary changes) is working. How Is Hemoglobin A1c Measured? The test for hemoglobin A1c depends on the chemical (electrical) charge on the molecule of HbA1c, which differs from the charges on the other components of hemoglobin. The molecule of HbA1c also differs in size from the other components. HbA1c may be separated by charge and size from the other hemoglobin A components in blood by a procedure called high pressure (or performance) liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC separates mixtures (for example, blood) into its various components by adding the mixtures to special liquids and passing them under pressure through columns filled with a material that separates the mixture into its different component molecules. HbA1c testing is done on a blood sample. Because HbA1c is not affected by short-term fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations, for example, due to meals, blood can be drawn for HbA1c testing without regard to when food was eaten. Fasting for the blood test is not necessary. What Are Continue reading >>

A1c Test

A1c Test

Print Overview The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well you're managing your diabetes. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications. Why it's done An international committee of experts from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the International Diabetes Federation, recommend that the A1C test be the primary test used to diagnose prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. After a diabetes diagnosis, the A1C test is used to monitor your diabetes treatment plan. Since the A1C test measures your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months instead of your blood sugar level at a specific point in time, it is a better reflection of how well your diabetes treatment plan is working overall. Your doctor will likely use the A1C test when you're first diagnosed with diabetes. This also helps establish a baseline A1C level. The test may then need to be repeated while you're learning to control your blood sugar. Later, how often you need the A1C test depends on the type of diabetes you have, your treatment plan and how well you're managing your blood sugar. For example, the A1C test may be recommended: Once every year if you have prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes Twice a year if Continue reading >>

More in diabetes