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An 88 Year-olds Secret Source Of Willpower

An 88 Year-olds Secret Source Of Willpower

An 88 Year-olds Secret Source of Willpower At 88, Great Aunt Jokie is eight years into the disease that led to her mothers premature death but still young by her siblings standards. Nine of her 13 brothers and sisters lived well into their 90s and two cracked the century mark.Ive got a long way to go to catch up, says Jokie, the youngest, who hasnt been called Josephine since sometime before World War II. She gave up bread and potatoes shortly after getting diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at age 80. She never tastes the pie served with meals at her assisted living facility in Bluffton, Ind., though she sometimes saves a piece to offer her daughter.And she doesnt touch the candy dishes she keeps on her coffee table, except to refill them for company. Now thats discipline. But what is willpower, after all, but waiting through all the times you must say no until the time arrives when you can finally say yes? For Jokie, that moment arrives every Wednesday night, when she allows herself a dish of ice cream. Like many who grew up long before anybody ever heard the term instant gratification, it turns out shes awfully good at waiting. Jokie was 17 when she developed leukemia. Her doctor ordered injections of Vitamin B-12, and eventually her health improved enough so that by 18 she received a marriage proposal from a neighbor boy whose three older siblings had already married into Jokies family.But my folks said I was too young to get married, she said. They said I had to wait until I was 21. Meanwhile, Eds mother worried he was making a bad decision.She told him, Shes not well. You might end up having to take care of her, Jokie recalled. But he said hed take care of me if he had to. Thats what he wanted. And he waited for me all those years. Eds gone now, as are the majority o Continue reading >>

Guidelines On Diabetes, Pre-diabetes, And Cardiovascular Diseases: Executive Summary | European Heart Journal | Oxford Academic

Guidelines On Diabetes, Pre-diabetes, And Cardiovascular Diseases: Executive Summary | European Heart Journal | Oxford Academic

Guidelines and Expert Consensus documents aim to present management and recommendations based on all of the relevant evidence on a particular subject in order to help physicians to select the best possible management strategies for the individual patient, suffering from a specific condition, taking into account not only the impact on outcome, but also the risk benefit ratio of a particular diagnostic or therapeutic procedure. The ESC recommendations for guidelines production can be found on the ESC website . In brief, the ESC appoints experts in the field to carry out a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the use of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and to assess the riskbenefit ratio of the therapies recommended for management and/or prevention of a given condition. The strength of evidence for or against particular procedures or treatments is weighed according to predefined scales for grading recommendations and levels of evidence, as outlined below. Once the document has been finalized and approved by all the experts involved in the Task Force, it is submitted to outside specialists for review. If necessary, the document is revised once more to be finally approved by the Committee for Practice Guidelines and selected members of the Board of the ESC. The ESC Committee for Practice Guidelines (CPG) supervises and coordinates the preparation of new Guidelines and Expert Consensus Documents produced by Task Forces, expert groups, or consensus panels. The chosen experts in these writing panels are asked to provide disclosure statements of all relationships they may have, which might be perceived as real or potential conflicts of interest. These disclosure forms are kept on file at the European Heart House, headquarters of the ESC. The Committee is also responsib Continue reading >>

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

back to Overview Know-how Type 2 A tag-team approach on low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. Markus recently wrote an article on our German language blog talking about low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. The question (“can I have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes?”) is very common, and it’s easy to see why it’s of concern. So I’ve helped Markus bring his German post to life here in English. I hope it helps! Here’s Markus: Low blood sugar In 2014, results from the DAWN2 study were announced. It was the largest study of its kind (15,000 participants) on the “fears & needs of people with diabetes and their families.” One result stood out: The gravest fears are related to low blood sugars, especially at night. Up to 69% of the participants share this fear! So! Can you have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes? Yes! Of course! But let’s think about who exactly is at risk – and why. It’s common to think: Type 1 diabetes = at risk for lows Type 2 diabetes = not at risk for lows But that isn’t correct at all, so we should wipe it from our mind. So… what do I need to know? Maybe it’s more accurate to say that people with type 2 diabetes who take certain types of medication are more at risk for lows. We’re getting closer! But to get to the truth, we should take a look at someone without diabetes. Is it possible for them to have lows, too? Theoretically yes, especially if doing long-lasting physical activities without proper food intake. Additionally, extreme stress and binge drinking are also common causes of low blood sugar for people without diabetes. However, it’s pretty rare because as soon as BG’s drop below 80 mg/dl (4.4 mmol/L), the natural counterregulatory system kicks in, raising blood sugar back to normal levels. I’ve never exp Continue reading >>

88diabetes: Is 88diabetes.com The Right Solution For You?

88diabetes: Is 88diabetes.com The Right Solution For You?

If you are reading this, you probably heard about 88 Diabetes ( 88diabetes.com ) on the radio. Heres the urgent info you NEED to know. This is an important message from Dr. Scott Saunders the physician who helped create the program at 88Diabetes . You can tell he is passionate his lifes mission is helping people reverse diabetes without spending the rest of their lives relying on expensive medication: As a Medical Doctor, Imsick and tiredof how people with high blood sugar, pre-diabetes or diabetes are being treated by the mainstream medical system. Thats why Im going to turn the tables on the Big Drug Companies that sell$114 BILLIONeach year in Diabetes and blood sugar drugs. Its no secret they would love to keep you buying their drugs Im going to show you how to improve your blood sugar levels and gain relief from your problems without side effects associated with the prescription medication. I am the mother of 3 teenagers. I was diagnosed with diabetes and my doctor put me on the prescription drug Metformin and then also on a statin drug. I had unbearable side effects. I got bad stomach cramps and felt ill. I became extremely tired (always), depressed and couldnt function on a day to day basis. I got your tips. It was the best thing Ive ever done in my life. Ultimately, was able to move off drugs. It was so simple and straightforward, so easy. My sugar levels are down, and my energy level is up. I now go to the gym and have lost weight. If you are serious about getting your diabetes under control, or youre pre-diabetic and want to reverse the dangerous road you are headed down, then 88Diabetes.com is the place you should start. If you utilized these affiliate links on this page and visit the resulting site and make a purchase, we may potentially receive a commission Continue reading >>

An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie

An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie

An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie This site uses cookies to improve performance. If your browser does not accept cookies, you cannot view this site. There are many reasons why a cookie could not be set correctly. Below are the most common reasons: You have cookies disabled in your browser. You need to reset your browser to accept cookies or to ask you if you want to accept cookies. Your browser asks you whether you want to accept cookies and you declined. To accept cookies from this site, use the Back button and accept the cookie. Your browser does not support cookies. Try a different browser if you suspect this. The date on your computer is in the past. If your computer's clock shows a date before 1 Jan 1970, the browser will automatically forget the cookie. To fix this, set the correct time and date on your computer. You have installed an application that monitors or blocks cookies from being set. You must disable the application while logging in or check with your system administrator. This site uses cookies to improve performance by remembering that you are logged in when you go from page to page. To provide access without cookies would require the site to create a new session for every page you visit, which slows the system down to an unacceptable level. This site stores nothing other than an automatically generated session ID in the cookie; no other information is captured. In general, only the information that you provide, or the choices you make while visiting a web site, can be stored in a cookie. For example, the site cannot determine your email name unless you choose to type it. Allowing a website to create a cookie does not give that or any other site access to the rest of your computer, and only the site that created the cookie can read it. Continue reading >>

Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88 (myd88)-deficiency Increases Risk Of Diabetes In Mice

Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88 (myd88)-deficiency Increases Risk Of Diabetes In Mice

Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88 (MyD88)-Deficiency Increases Risk of Diabetes in Mice * E-mail: [email protected] (TH); [email protected] (KO) Affiliation Department of Pharmacotherapy, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan Affiliation Department of Pharmacotherapy, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan Affiliation Department of Pharmacotherapy, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan Affiliation Department of Host Defense, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan * E-mail: [email protected] (TH); [email protected] (KO) Affiliation Department of Pharmacotherapy, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88 (MyD88)-Deficiency Increases Risk of Diabetes in Mice Multiple lines of evidence suggest innate immune response pathways to be involved in the development of obesity-associated diabetes although the molecular mechanism underling the disease is unknown. Recent observations suggest that saturated fatty acids can act as a ligand for toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, which is thought to mediate obesity-associated insulin resistance. Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is an adapter protein for TLR/IL-1 receptor signaling, which is involved in the activation of inflammatory pathways. To evaluate molecular mechanisms linking obesity-associated diabetes down-stream of TLR4, we investigated physiological role of MyD88 in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. In the present study, we found MyD88-deficient mice fed a HFD had increased circulating levels of insulin, leptin and cholesterol, as well as liver dysfunction (increased indu Continue reading >>

Seasonal Fluctuations Of Glycated Hemoglobin Levels In Japanese Diabetic Patients.

Seasonal Fluctuations Of Glycated Hemoglobin Levels In Japanese Diabetic Patients.

Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2010 Apr;88(1):65-70. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2009.12.011. Epub 2010 Jan 4. Seasonal fluctuations of glycated hemoglobin levels in Japanese diabetic patients. Diabetes Center, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan. [email protected] We examined whether glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1C)) levels of Japanese diabetic patients showed seasonal fluctuations. Subjects included 2511 diabetic patients who regularly visited a single diabetic outpatient clinic for 10 years. A total of 253,477 HbA(1C) measurements, as well as sex, age, BMI, type of diabetes, and mode of therapy were extracted from a hospital-based database. For the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, average monthly HbA(1C) values of subjects and amplitudes of seasonal fluctuations were calculated. For the time-series analysis, seasonal adjustment factors of each subject were classified as complete, incomplete, or no fluctuation. Subjects showed a clear seasonal fluctuation of HbA(1C) levels, with highest levels in March (7.69%) and lowest levels in August (7.46%; p<0.001). The amplitudes of the seasonal fluctuations were associated with the mean HbA(1C) levels. The time-series analysis showed that 78.3% of patients had complete or incomplete seasonal fluctuations. HbA(1C) levels were highest in winter-spring and lowest in summer-autumn in most patients; however, some patients showed a reverse pattern. Seasonal fluctuations of HbA(1C) levels were recognized in most of the Japanese diabetic patients. Physiological or metabolic factors related to temperature may be the main cause of seasonal fluctuations in HbA(1C) levels. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Level At 88 With Hypoglycemic Symptoms?

Blood Glucose Level At 88 With Hypoglycemic Symptoms?

Blood Glucose Level at 88 with Hypoglycemic Symptoms? Blood Glucose Level at 88 with Hypoglycemic Symptoms? I'm new here, just registered. I've been really trying to take care of my diabetes in trying different things i.e. exercise, diet. But After a workout today I came home to measure my BG level and was at 179. So I dropped in 6 units of Humalog and just minded my own business. After some hours I started to feel jittery, weak and extreme hunger. So I measured my BG level and it was at 88. I thought 88 was "normal" level not hypoglycemic range. Does anyone have any insight to this? I'm very confused... Just to give some background on what I eat and do for exercise. I started low carb diet this week which consisted of, breakfast: Eggs (3-4), hand full of broccoli lunch: plan 1. Can of tuna mixed with mayo, turkey ham and pico de gallo. plan 2. Can of chicken breast mixed with mayo and shrimp, pico de gallo Dinner: Pasta sauce with organic ground meat spread over broccoli I lift weight and do cardio. My plan consists of, Monday: Shoulders 4 exercises, 3 reps each Wednesday: Back & Biceps 4 exercises, 3 reps each Friday: Chest & Triceps 4 exercises, 3 reps each All exercises followed by 30 mins of cardio with target heart rate of 170 I also drink 100% whey protein with no carb before and after workouts Humalog 6 units before each meal (After diet change and exercise I change dosage per BG reading) Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy Although your readig of 88 is not a text book low, it is low for you and you will have all the classic symptoms of a low. Test prior to your work out and have some protein with you for a mid-workout snack. Test at that mid-way point too. D.D. Family Type 1 since 1976. Diagnosed at 2yrs. You will find a wealth of knowledg Continue reading >>

88% Of Chennais Corporate Workforce Is At Risk Of Diabetes: Study

88% Of Chennais Corporate Workforce Is At Risk Of Diabetes: Study

88% of Chennais corporate workforce is at risk of diabetes: Study A study conducted by S10 Healthcare suggests that 88% of Chennai professionals face the risk of diabetes due to the sedentary lifestyle, erratic eating habits and work induced stress levels. The study was done on a sample size of about 1,500 professionals that included 1,200 males and 300 females. CHENNAI: A study conducted by S10 Healthcare suggests that 88% of Chennai professionals face the risk of diabetes due to the sedentary lifestyle, erratic eating habits and work induced stress levels. The study was done on a sample size of about 1,500 professionals that included 1,200 males and 300 females. According to the study, only 12% of the population was with low or no risk of diabetes and 73% of the working individuals faced the risk of obesity. It also concluded that working women are at a higher risk compared to male population and the especially corporate workforce in their 20s are diabetic. Speaking on the report, Dr Dobson Dominic, medical director at S10, said: We live in a world where we are so caught up with ourselves that we struggle to strike a balance between our professional and personal lives. The young clan, especially, is so inclined towards fast food, binging and instant meals that surviving on healthy diet is not taken seriously. As a result, we see an increase in diabetes and obesity. Uncontrolled diabetes can affect various parts of the body, including blood vessels, heart, kidney, eye, gums and nerves. Hence, adequate and preventive measures should be adapted to control the spread of diabetes among the citys workforce, he added. Get latest news & live updates on the go on your pc with News App . Download The Times of India news app for your device. Read more City news in English and o Continue reading >>

Vinegar Ingestion At Bedtime Moderates Waking Glucose Concentrations In Adults With Well-controlled Type 2 Diabetes

Vinegar Ingestion At Bedtime Moderates Waking Glucose Concentrations In Adults With Well-controlled Type 2 Diabetes

Given the importance of maintaining acceptable blood glucose concentrations, there is much interest in identifying foods and diet patterns that will help individuals with diabetes manage their condition. Based on previous data indicating that vinegar ingestion at mealtime reduces postprandial glycemia (1–4), the aim of this pilot study was to examine whether vinegar ingestion at bedtime reduces the next-morning fasting glucose concentration in individuals with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— Four men and seven women (aged 40–72 years) diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (by a physician) who were not taking insulin completed the study. Participants provided a clinically determined A1C reading from a recent (<2 months) blood analysis. All participants gave written informed consent, and the study was approved by the institutional review board at Arizona State University. Participants maintained 24-h diet records for 3 days and measured fasting glucose at 0700 h for 3 consecutive days with a calibrated glucometer before the start of the study. Participants were instructed to continue usual prescription medication use during the study. Utilizing a randomized crossover design with a 3- to 5-day washout period between treatments, participants followed a standardized meal plan for 2 days, consuming either 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar or water at bedtime with 1 oz cheese (8 g protein, 1 g carbohydrate, and 1.5 g fat). The standardized meal plan was designed to reflect the individual's typical diet. Participants were instructed to record all foods and beverages ingested during each 2-day treatment period. Fasting glucose was recorded with a calibrated glucometer by each participant during the trial: at baseline (day 0) and day 2 at 0700 h. These results were download Continue reading >>

Frontiers | From Diabetes Care To Diabetes Curethe Integration Of Systems Biology, Ehealth, And Behavioral Change | Endocrinology

Frontiers | From Diabetes Care To Diabetes Curethe Integration Of Systems Biology, Ehealth, And Behavioral Change | Endocrinology

Front. Endocrinol., 22 January 2018 | From Diabetes Care to Diabetes CureThe Integration of Systems Biology, eHealth, and Behavioral Change 1Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), Department of Microbiology and Systems Biology, Leiden, Netherlands 2Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), Department of Child Health, Leiden, Netherlands 3Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden, Netherlands 4Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), Department of Work Health Technology, Leiden, Netherlands 5Department of Health, Medical and Neuropsychology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands 6Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands 7Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), Department of Internal Medicine, Leiden, Netherlands From a biological view, most of the processes involved in insulin resistance, which drives the pathobiology of type 2 diabetes, are reversible. This theoretically makes the disease reversible and curable by changing dietary habits and physical activity, particularly when adopted early in the disease process. Yet, this is not fully implemented and exploited in health care due to numerous obstacles. This article reviews the state of the art in all areas involved in a diabetes cure-focused therapy and discusses the scientific and technological advancements that need to be integrated into a systems approach sustainable lifestyle-based healthcare system and economy. The implementation of lifestyle as cure necessitates personalized and sustained lifestyle adaptations, which can only be established by a systems approach, including all relevant aspects (pers Continue reading >>

Treating Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Traditional Chinese And Indian Medicinal Herbs

Treating Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Traditional Chinese And Indian Medicinal Herbs

Go to: 1. Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic illness due to endocrine dysfunction. Uncontrolled, diabetes is associated with various acute and chronic comorbidities. T2DM is a rapidly growing health concern in both developed and developing nations. T2DM accounts for over 90% of cases globally [1, 2]. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2011, approximately 364 million people globally suffer from diabetes (DM), with projections that DM-related deaths will double from 2005 to 2030 [3]. In 2004, 3.4 million people died directly from the consequences of high blood glucose. The prevalence of DM worldwide was calculated as 2.8% in 2000. This is expected to increase to 4.4% by 2030 [4]. The growing concern is the epidemic growth in obesity and increase in the elderly population, which will continue to increase the prevalence of DM. Another study, using data from 91 countries, estimates that the prevalence can be as high as 7.7% (439 million adults) by 2030 [2]. Other estimates include a 70% increase in DM in developing countries and 20% increase in developed nations. In the United States, T2DM is quickly becoming an epidemic. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that in the United States alone, 25.8 million Americans, or 8.3% of the population, suffer from DM, with 7 millions currently undiagnosed [5]. DM is higher, 26.9%, in the elderly (65 years or older). But it is also rapidly becoming a disease observed in younger patients with almost 2 millions over the age of 20 being newly diagnosed with DM in 2010. More alarmingly, 35% of adults over the age of 20 and 50% of elderly had prediabetes. This equates to 79 million people in the US. DM is the primary cause of renal failure, non-traumatic lower-limb amputations, and newly diag Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

Go to: Prevalence of diabetes in pancreatic cancer Numerous studies have reported the prevalence of diabetes in cancer in general and pancreatic cancer in particular. In studying prevalence, researches have taken a number of different approaches in defining the presence of diabetes in cases of controls. These include physician-recorded diagnosis of diabetes, International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes for diabetes, self-reported diabetes by patients answering a questionnaire, patients on anti-diabetes medicationsa and laboratory records showing elevated fasting blood glucose values and elevated glycosylated hemoglobin values. Few studies have prospectively screened patients for diabetes using glucose tolerance tests or measuring fasting glucose values. The prevalence of diabetes in pancreatic cancer has varied considerably (from 4% to 65%) in reported studies, variability that has largely resulted in ascertainment of diabetes noted above. In retrospective studies of medical records and studies relying on self-reported diabetes, the prevalence of diabetes in pancreatic cancer has varied from 4% to 20%.5 A recently published study using medical records to identify diabetes reported the prevalence of diabetes in pancreatic cancer to be 10% which was no different from that seen in the control non-cancer subjects.6 On the other hand, in studies where patients with pancreatic cancer were prospectively screened for diabetes or where fasting blood glucose data on patients was reviewed, the prevalence of diabetes has been shown to be very high (45% and 75%),7–9 a prevalence many times greater than that reported in the general population. A study by Permert et al.7 using glucose tolerance tests in patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer showed that 75% of patie Continue reading >>

88. Diabetes And Stroke: Liraglutide Is Associated With A Decreased Risk Of Stroke In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. A Nested Case-control Study

88. Diabetes And Stroke: Liraglutide Is Associated With A Decreased Risk Of Stroke In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. A Nested Case-control Study

88. Diabetes and stroke: Liraglutide is associated with a decreased risk of stroke in type 2 diabetes mellitus. A nested case-control study Jan Scheel-Thomsen, Jakob Starup-Linde, Michael Gejl, Soeren Gregersen, Peter Vestergaard Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with an increased risk of stroke. We investigated the effects of antidiabetic drugs on stroke incidence in DM patients. We conducted a nested case-control study. Cases were DM patients who subsequently suffered from stroke; controls were DM patients with no history of stroke. Using the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register, we included DM patients with information on date of DM diagnosis, date of stroke, and comorbidities. From the Central Region of Jutland, Denmark, medication use and biochemical parameters (LDL, HDL, total cholesterol, HbA1c and creatinine) were collected. We used covariate logistic regression to calculate the adjusted odds ratios. 16,396 DM patients were included, and of these 1,660 patients had information on biochemistry. Use of insulin, biguanides, -cell stimulating drugs, DPP-4 inhibitors and liraglutide decreased the risk of stroke. A trend for a dose- and duration-response was present for liraglutide. Exenatide and pioglitazone had no significant effect. Antihypertensive drugs showed the most pronounced effect, and no difference in preventive effect between antidiabetic agents and statins were observed. When results were adjusted for biochemistry, liraglutide was the only antidiabetic drug with a significant reduction on the risk of stroke. We have shown an association between use of liraglutide and a reduced risk of stroke in type 2 DM patients. The effect was not tied to patient biochemical values, e.g. cholesterol or glucose-control (HbA1c). The decreased stroke risk may r Continue reading >>

Dyslipidemia In Type 2 Diabetes.

Dyslipidemia In Type 2 Diabetes.

Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, 5700 Martin Luther King Jr Way, Oakland, CA 94609, USA. [email protected] Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a cluster of lipid abnormalities:elevated plasma triglycerides, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and smaller and denser low-density lipoproteins,which have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance may contribute to dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes by increasing hepatic secretion of large,triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoprotein particles and by impairing the clearance of lipoprotein particles from plasma. Lifestyle interventions may be effective in improving the diabetic dyslipidemia syndrome. For patients who do not respond to lifestyle changes, pharmacologic therapies (lipid-lowering medications and anti-diabetic agents) are available. Clinical trials demonstrate that the use of such pharmaceutics to treat diabetic dyslipidemia concomitantly reduces the risk of coronary artery disease. Continue reading >>

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