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8 Facts About Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 2 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. About 90 to 95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Being overweight (BMI greater than 25) increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There’s a genetic mutation involved in type 2 diabetes, although researchers haven’t been able to pinpoint the exact mutation. You must have a genetic mutation in order to develop type 2—not everyone can get it. If you have a family history, you are at higher risk. Many people are overweight when they’re diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. However, you don’t have to be overweight to develop it. Type 2 used to be called “adult-onset diabetes” because it was diagnosed mainly in older people. Today, though, more children around the world are being diagnosed with type 2, so type 2 is the more common name now. Most people with type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant, meaning that their bodies don’t use insulin properly. They make more than enough of it, but their cells are resistant to it and do not know how to use it properly. Some people with type 2 diabetes don’t produce enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes can usually be managed well with a combination of healthier meal plan choices, physical activity, and oral medications. Some people may have to take insulin in order to get better blood glucose control. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

Diabetes Facts - 25 Facts About Diabetes | Kickassfacts.com

Diabetes Facts - 25 Facts About Diabetes | Kickassfacts.com

1. To understand diabetes, a lock and key analogy is useful. To provide energy to cells, insulin (the key) unlocks cells to let sugars in. Type-A is the pancreas producing too few keys, so insulin is injected. Type-B means rusty keyholes, which can be fixed with exercise, weight loss, or medicine. Source 2. Alzheimers disease is considered by some scientists to be Type 3 diabetes because it results from resistance to insulin in the brain . Source 3. A woman with Type 1 diabetes underwent an islet cell transplant. Since the transplant, her glucose levels have remained at a healthy level, and she was taken off insulin and has no dietary restrictions. She is like a nondiabetic person but requires antirejection drugs. Source 4. In ancient India, Diabetes was called madhumeha or honey urine as the urine would attract ants. Indian physicians Sushruta and Charaka identified Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes as separate conditions for the first time in 400-500 CE. Source 5. Doctors before the eleventh century would drink the urine of their patients to determine whether or not they had diabetes. A sugary taste indicated the person was diabetic. Source 6. Drinking one soda a day can increase Diabetes risk by 22%. Source 7. Miraculin, a protein found in the West African Miracle fruit and unique sweetener that could help people with diabetes was mysteriously shot down by the FDA in the 1970s. Source 8. A time capsule was buried in Sir Frederick Banting Square, on the scientists 100th birthday, Nov. 14, 1991. Banting was part of a team that received the 1923 Nobel Prize in Medicine for the isolation of insulin. The time capsule will be opened once a cure for diabetes has been found. Source 9.Breastfeeding helps to reduce the risk oftype 2 diabetes in maternal. Source 10. People with a cer Continue reading >>

10 Essential Facts About Type 2 Diabetes

10 Essential Facts About Type 2 Diabetes

Your body breaks down the food you eat and uses it for growth and energy. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body may not be able to accomplish this routine function as efficiently. The good news is “there's a lot people can do to improve their lifestyle and live long, healthy lives,” says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, and director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Here are 10 essential facts you need to know about type 2 diabetes so that you can make the right decisions and stay healthy — for life: It's the most common type of diabetes. More than 23 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, and of those, 90 to 95 percent have type 2 diabetes, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). If you’re 45 or older, you should get tested, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). And people who are overweight and have another risk factor should be tested sooner. Risk factors include: Having a parent or sibling with diabetes Being of African-American, American-Indian, Asian, Hispanic, or of Pacific Islander descent Being sedentary Having high blood pressure Having abnormal cholesterol levels (low HDL or high triglycerides) Having a history of cardiovascular disease Having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) If you have diabetes, you should know your blood glucose numbers. One way to know if your treatment is working is to track your blood glucose levels. Target ranges are based on individual considerations. Your doctor will let you know where your numbers should be. Your diet doesn’t have to be restrictive. “A meal plan to better manage diabetes is simply a healthy eating pattern that all of us should be following,” Massey says. The ADA encourages a balanced diet that includes vegetables, Continue reading >>

25 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

25 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

Trivia can be fun and interesting, especially when you are learning about something that is close to home. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does, you might want to learn some interesting facts about this disease. Seeing how greatly treatment has evolved can be empowering. In addition, learning more about diabetes can help to increase your awareness and motivate you to take control. The earliest known written record that likely referred to diabetes was in 1500 B.C in the Egyptian Ebers papyrus. It referred to the symptoms of frequent urination. Diabetes symptoms such as thirst, weight loss, and excess urination were recognized for more than 1200 years before the disease was named. The Greek physician Aretaeus (30-90CE) was credited with coming up with the name "diabetes." He recorded a disease with symptoms such as constant thirst (polydipsia), excessive urination (polyuria) and weight loss. He named the condition "diabetes," meaning "a flowing through." Dr. Thomas Willis (1621-1675) called diabetes the "pissing evil" and described the urine of people with type 2 diabetes as "wonderfully sweet, as if it was imbued with honey or sugar." He was also the first to describe pain and stinging from nerve damage due to diabetes. In ancient times, doctors would test for diabetes by tasting urine to see if it was sweet. People who tasted urine to check for diabetes were called "water tasters." Other diagnostic measures included checking to see if urine attracted ants or flies. In the late 1850's, a French physician named Priorry advised his patients with diabetes to eatlarge quantities of sugar. Obviously, that method of treatment did not last, as sugar increases blood sugars. Back in the day, there were no blood glucose meters. Instead, they tested for blood sugar u Continue reading >>

Healthcare Tips | Interesting Facts About Diabetes

Healthcare Tips | Interesting Facts About Diabetes

Ask Your Doctor Preventing Type 2 Diabetes You tend to consume a lot of sugary foods and beverages. You experienced gestational diabetes when you were pregnant but it went away. You have a relative with type 2 diabetes. You have been diagnosed with prediabetes. If so, you have a higher than average risk of developing the most common form of diabetes type 2. With type 2 diabetes, the body either doesn't produce enough insulin, or it resists insulin. That can lead to serious health conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, or eye and foot problems. Not only that, but the longer you have diabetes, the more likely you will develop health problems. Which is why its important to ask your doctor this question How Can I Delay or Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? There are several things you can do to prevent or at least delay the onset of type 2 diabetes: Lose excess weight and keep it off.People who are overweight or have obesity have added pressure on their body's ability to use insulin to properly control blood sugar levels. Aim at losing five to seven percent of your starting weight. Example: If you weigh 250 pounds, your goal would be to lose approximately 13 to 18 pounds. Become more active. You should get at least 30 minutes of exercise or physical activity five days per week. But if you havent previously been active, talk with your doctor first about which activities are best for you. Start slowly and gradually work your way up to your personal goal. Eat and drink responsibly. Eat healthy foods with less fat in smaller portions to reduce the number of calories you consume and help yourself lose weight. Avoid sweetened beverages and drink water instead. Ask your doctor about Metformin. Its a diabetes drug that helps prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Your physician can Continue reading >>

64 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

64 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

The word “diabetes” is Greek for “siphon,” which refers to the copious urine of uncontrolled diabetes. “Mellitus” is Latin for “honey” or “sweet,” a name added when physicians discovered that the urine from people with diabetes is sweet with glucose.[8] Scientists predict that there may be 30 million new cases of diabetes in China alone by 2025.[1] The earliest recorded mention of a disease that can be recognized as diabetes is found in the Ebers papyrus (1500 B.C.), which includes directions for several mixtures that could “remove the urine, which runs too often.”[1] The name “diabetes” is attributed to the famed Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia who practiced in the first century A.D. He believed that diabetes was caused by snakebite.[1] William Cullen (1710-1790), a professor of chemistry and medicine in Scotland, is responsible for adding the term “mellitus” (“sweet” or “honey-like”) to the word diabetes.[1] Insulin was coined from the Latin insula (“island”) because the hormone is secreted by the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas.[9] In 1889, Oskar Minkowski (1858-191931) discovered the link between diabetes and the pancreas (pan - “all” + kreas - “flesh) when a dog from which he removed the pancreas developed diabetes.[1] Before the discovery of insulin, surgeons rarely operated on diabetic patients with gangrene because the patients typically would not heal and would inevitably die. On occasion, an area of gangrene would “auto-amputate,” meaning it would dry up and fall off.[1] Before the discovery of insulin in 1921, physicians would often put their patients on starvation or semi-starvation diets, recommending they eat only foods such as oatmeal.[1] In 1996, a 16-year-old girl with diabetes died at he Continue reading >>

8 Diabetes Facts That You Should Know!

8 Diabetes Facts That You Should Know!

medicine, diabetes, glycemia, health care and people concept - close up of woman with syringe making insulin injection to himself at home In the recent National day rally 2017, one of the key issues raised by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong was on Singapores war against diabetes. It is precisely because you are not worried that I am worried. It is precisely because many people do not take diabetes seriously that it has become a serious problem, PM Lee said in his speech at the rally. Diabetes is somethingthat should not be overlooked anymore! Here are 8 facts about diabetes that you might not have known: 1 in 9 Singaporeans aged 18-69 have Diabetes 1 in 3 of these people do not even know they have Diabetes Out of all the patients suffering from Diabetes, only 5% suffer from type I Diabetes Type II Diabetes can be prevented by weight loss, eating healthy, and frequent 30 minutes exercise daily like brisk walking. Based on figures from the National Registry of Diseases, in 2014, about 1 in 2 heart attack cases had diabetes; 2 in 3 new kidney failure cases were due to diabetes, and 2 in 5 stroke cases had diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can remain undiagnosed for manyyears and the high blood glucose levels would have caused diabetes complications. People with Type 2 diabetes are often diagnosed as a result of having complications rather than because they suspect they have diabetes. Diabetes is the number 10th leading cause of death in Singapore accounting for 1.7 per cent of total deaths in 2011. There is no cure for diabetes, only disease management Continue reading >>

10 Facts You May Not Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 Facts You May Not Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 Facts You May Not Know About Type 1 Diabetes 1.Type 1 diabetes develops when a patients immune system mysteriously destroys pancreatic cells that make the hormone insulin , which regulates blood sugar and helps cells use the sugar glucose for energy. 2.Type 1 Diabetes is the second most common chronic illness in children, behind asthma . 3.Cases of Type 1 diabetes are increasing worldwide , particularly in young children. 4.Warning signs can include extreme thirst, frequent urination, a fruity breath odor and blurred vision. Generalized symptoms such as fatigue, nausea, stomachache, appetite changes and weight loss can also be indicators of Type 1 diabetes. 5. Kids are oftenmisdiagnosed with viruses, acid reflux , strep throat, sinus or urinary tract infections . 6. Left untreated, kids are at risk for a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) . DKA develops when glucose-starved cells trigger a process that makes blood more acidic. 7. Type 1 Diabetes almost always appears before age 40. Half of patients are diagnosed by 18. 8. By 2050 in the United States, cases in children and teenagers are predicted to more than triple, with the average age of diagnosis apparently increasing. 9. In Philadelphia, Pa, the incidence of Type 1 diabetes in children younger than 5 has more than double since 1985. 10. The mortality rate is highest in babies, toddlers, and preschoolers, due to delayed diagnoses and greater vulnerability to dehydration. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Myths Vs Facts

Diabetes Myths Vs Facts

Not everything you hear about diabetes is true. That’s why it is important to get the facts, so you can make good decisions to better manage your diabetes. Myth: "Diabetes is not that big of a deal." Fact: Diabetes is a big deal, but if you manage it right, you may be able to help delay or even avoid some diabetes-related health complications down the road. Myth: "People who are overweight eventually get diabetes." Fact: Being overweight is just one risk factor for developing diabetes. There are other factors, such as family history, race or ethnicity, and age. By knowing all of the risk factors, you may better understand your overall risk and what you can do to improve your health. Myth: "Eating too much sugar can cause type 2 diabetes." Fact: As mentioned above, weight gain is one risk factor for getting diabetes. Taking in too many calories causes an increase in weight. Drinking sugary drinks is one way to take in extra calories. The American Diabetes Association recommends not drinking a lot of sugary drinks. Sugar-sweetened drinks include: Regular (non-diet) sodas Fruit drinks including fruit punch Energy drinks Sports drinks Sweetened tea Instead, choose from zero or low-calorie drinks like water, unsweetened tea, coffee, or diet soda. A splash of lemon can also make your drink light and refreshing without the added calories. One 12-ounce can of regular (non-diet) soda contains approximately 150 calories and 40 grams of carbohydrates. Did you know that this is the same amount of carbohydrates in 10 teaspoons of sugar? Myth: "Having diabetes always leads to bad health problems." Fact: If you follow your diabetes care plan, you may be able to delay or prevent diabetes-related health problems. Myth: "It’s your own fault that you have diabetes." Fact: Diabetes isn Continue reading >>

8 Things You Need To Know About Diabetes

8 Things You Need To Know About Diabetes

About 95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes . Only about 5% of people with diabetes get type 1 diabetes , which usually appears in childhood or early adulthood. Often type 1 diabetes has a genetic component, although a virus may trigger the disease. People with type 2 disease often develop the disease as they reach middle age (over the age of 45), although with increasing obesity rates, even younger people are being diagnosed with the disease. While there may be a family history with type 2 diabetes as well, many people become diabetic as a result of overweight or obesity, lack of exercise, and health problems like high blood pressure. In both types of diabetes, your blood sugar or blood glucose is too high. Blood sugar comes from the food you eat. In order for this energy to fuel your cells, you need a hormone made in the pancreas, called insulin, while a second hormone, glucagon, works with the insulin to control the level of blood glucose. If you have type 1 diabetes, your immune system which normally fights infection, instead attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. As a result, the pancreas stops making insulin. Without the necessary insulin for glucose to fuel the cell, the blood glucose rises to deadly levels very quickly, within a few days or weeks. To survive, you must replace this insulin with daily injections of insulin. It is also important to exercise and follow a careful diet to avoid hypoglycemiawhen glucose levels drop below normal. Type 2 diabetes: not enough insulin and insulin resistance In type 2 diabetes, your body doesnt make enough insulin or doesnt use insulin well (called insulin resistance). This type of diabetes can take a long time, even years, to develop. The symptoms may be mild and may even be ignored u Continue reading >>

Diabetes Myths

Diabetes Myths

Tweet There are a number of myths about diabetes that are all too commonly reported as facts. These misrepresentations of diabetes can sometimes be harmful and lead to an unfair stigma around the condition. Diabetes information is widely available, both from healthcare professionals and the Internet, but not all of it is true. It can be hard to know what is accurate, so this page aims to highlight the top ten of the most common diabetes myths. As well as diabetes myths, you may be interested in these diabetes facts. Myth 1: People with diabetes can’t eat sugar This is one of the most common diabetes myths; that people with the condition have to eat a sugar-free diet. People with diabetes need to eat a diet that is balanced, which can include some sugar in moderation. People with diabetes can eat sugar. Myth 2: Type 2 diabetes is mild This diabetes myth is widely repeated, but of course it isn’t true. No form of diabetes is mild. If type 2 diabetes is poorly managed it can lead to serious (even life-threatening) complications. Good control of diabetes can significantly decrease the risk of complications but this doesn’t mean the condition itself is not serious. Myth 3: Type 2 diabetes only affects fat people Whilst type 2 diabetes is often associated with being overweight and obese by the media, it is patently untrue that type 2 diabetes only affects overweight people. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a normal weight, or underweight. Myth 4: People with diabetes should only eat diabetic food Diabetic food is one of the most common myths of the last ten years. The label ‘diabetic’ is often used on sweets foods. Often sugar alcohols, or other sweeteners, will be used instead of sugar. Diabetic food will often still affect blood glucose levels, is Continue reading >>

8 Important Facts About Diabetes

8 Important Facts About Diabetes

Diabetes is more common than you may think. In fact, type 2 diabetes affects some 18 million Americans! That means that you, your relatives and/or your friends may have diabetes or have been affected by it in some way. But how much do you actually know about diabetes? Here are 8 important facts about diabetes: Diabetes is a disease in which the body is unable to properly use and store carbohydrate or blood sugar. Diabetes happens when either the pancreas (an organ that helps with digestion and controlling blood sugar) does not produce any insulin or produces very little insulin, or when the body does not respond well to insulin, which is called insulin resistance. There are two types of diabetes: type 1 (sometimes called juvenile diabetes) and type 2 (sometimes called adult onset). Type 1 diabetes occurs because the cells of the pancreas are destroyed by the bodys immune system. The typical age a person finds out they have type 1 diabetes is under 20 years old. There is nothing you can do to stop yourself from getting type 1 diabetes, but it is important that it is diagnosed and treated. People with type 1 diabetes can live long and healthy lives with careful medical management and self-care. Type 2 diabetes is when the pancreas does secrete insulin but it is not enough because the cells are resistant to insulin, so it doesnt do its job as well as it should. There are genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes but there are also many lifestyle behaviors that can be changed to reduce or even eliminate your risks for developing type 2 diabetes. Your healthcare provider will tell you if you have diabetes by looking at your blood and urine tests. Many providers will also try to identify when their patients have prediabetes (also detected with blood tests) so that they can re Continue reading >>

10 Curious Facts About Diabetes

10 Curious Facts About Diabetes

Diabetes is a condition wherein the body is unable to regulate itself, either by producing insufficient amounts of insulin or proving resistant to insulin. It has a laundry list of horrible side effects, not limited to amputations and blindness, and numbers are at an all-time high. Although linked to obesity, diabetes affects people of all body types, many who barely have enough to eat. According to the International Diabetes Federation, around 382 million people in the world are afflicted, a number they estimate will rise to 592 million by 2035. While medications and careful health management can greatly prolong life, in places like sub-Saharan Africa where such resources are limited, 75 percent of diabetes deaths occur in people under the age of 60. 10 Whiskey Diabetes mellitus literally means “sweet urine,” as those with the disease tend to pass a great deal of sugar when they pee. Before modern testing methods, doctors would actually taste a patient’s urine if they suspected the person had diabetes. Luckily, those days have passed, but bizarrely enough, people continue to drink the urine of diabetics. James Gilpin of London produces “Gilpin Family Whiskey,” which takes the urine of elderly diabetes patients and filters it, then adds it to mash. The sugar in the urine begins the fermentation process, and within a few weeks, a perfectly serviceable whiskey is produced—though Gilpin claims it is better if aged awhile in the bottle. Gilpin Family Whiskey is not sold; rather, it is freely distributed as a “public health statement.” 9 Wilford Brimley If anyone could be considered the “face” of diabetes, it would be Wilford Brimley. Known for his portrayals of gruff, stodgy old men, Brimley has been in dozens of films, including The Natural, Cocoon, and Continue reading >>

See: 12 Facts About Diabetes

See: 12 Facts About Diabetes

This World Diabetes Day (14 November 2016) we look at 12 facts about Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes that you may not know. Much of what youve heard about diabetes is probably not true. Dr. May currently works as a fulltime endocrinologist and has been in private practice since 2004. He has a variety of interests, predominantly obesity and diabetes , but also sees patients with osteoporosis, thyroid disorders, men's health disorders, pituitary and adrenal disorders, polycystic ovaries, and disorders of growth. He is a leading member of several obesity and diabetes societies and runs a trial centre for new drugs. Get free advice from our panel of experts The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content. To prevent spam please solve this simple math problem: Continue reading >>

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