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7.3 A1c

A1c Is 7.3 After 1year/good?

A1c Is 7.3 After 1year/good?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I was a bit disappointed in my 7.3 a1c last week. My 1yr diagnosis date is St Patricks day. How long did it take you guys to be in the 6's???? i was diagnosed at 7, and that was 24 years ago, long before carb counting, MDI, and rapid acting insulins.... Still, I would say I have only had A1c's in the 6's consistently as of a few years ago. It takes a lot of work.... but 7.3 is damn good too, so I wouldn't stress over it. Just relax, keep tweaking, and you'll get it eventually! Hi Kel4han! I read your post and my first feeling was that I felt bad for you because I don't want you to feel bad about yourself! 7.3 is a good number! But, in all honesty, I know how you feel - are any of us ever truly, perfectly happy about our numbers? Even when I'm in the 6's, I want a number in the 5's! The chase never ends! I was shocked when my Diabetes Educator told me that some diabetics continually come in with A1C's in the 17 -18 mark! Now THEY should be freakin' out! I've got an appointment with my CDE tonight, though, and she has a meter to check it, so I have my fingers crossed...... Took me two years. I was always disappointed with a1cs in the 7s but at the same time I was a little scared of lows, on protophane (think most here know it as NPH) and not eating that well. I finally saw 6s - LOW 6s even (happy happy!) when I started Lantus, watched my carb intake more carefully, stopped worrying about going low if I was 5 or so (90 mgdl) - in fact, made that my daily 'resting' BG target (the figure I wanted when I had no food and no fast acting insulin me) and dealt to my dawn phenomenon by having just one u Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c definition and facts Hemoglobin A1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells that sugar molecules stick to, usually for the life of the red blood cell (about three months). The higher the level of glucose in the blood, the higher the level of hemoglobin A1c is detectable on red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1c levels correlate with average levels of glucose in the blood over an approximately three-month time period. Normal ranges for hemoglobin A1c in people without diabetes is about 4% to 5.9%. People with diabetes with poor glucose control have hemoglobin A1c levels above 7%. Hemoglobin A1c levels are routinely used to determine blood sugar control over time in people with diabetes. Decreasing hemoglobin A1c levels by 1% may decrease the risk of microvascular complications (for example, diabetic eye, nerve, or kidney disease) by 10%. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be checked, according to the American Diabetic Association, every six months in individuals with stable blood sugar control, and every three months if the person is trying to establish stable blood sugar control. Hemoglobin A1c has many other names such as glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and HbA1c. To explain what hemoglobin A1c is, think in simple terms. Sugar sticks to things, and when it has been stuck to something for a long time it's harder to the get sugar (glucose) off. In the body, sugar sticks too, particularly to proteins. The red blood cells that circulate in the body live for about three months before they die. When sugar (glucose) sticks to these red blood cells by binding to hemoglobin A1c, it gives us an idea of how much glucose has been around in the blood for the preceding three months. Hemoglobin A1c is a minor component of hemoglobin to which gl Continue reading >>

I Wonder If This Might Be A Drug That We Could Use Experimentally With Some Of Our Patients.

I Wonder If This Might Be A Drug That We Could Use Experimentally With Some Of Our Patients.

glucose. There may be some increased insulin sensitivity with its use also. Patients with Type II diabetes have on average dropped 7.7 kg and have had a decrease in hemoglobin A1c of anywhere from 0.7% to 0.85%. The main side effects include a slight increase in urinary tract infections (particularly those with a history of UTIs) and a rate of monilial infections in teenage and adult women of 7%. I did not know if this was a high rate but it turns out that in normal women the rate of monilial infection (yeast vaginitis) is 2%. The drug he was referring to is canagliflozin. I was fascinated with all of these drugs because in theory each one of them might produce improved control. Unfortunately, the improvement in control may not warrant the added expense and effort that these drugs would require. I am sure that there are going to be studies on these drugs over the next few years in pediatrics and I will look forward to seeing what they produce. With many of them there is a drop in weight which many of our teenagers would truly appreciate. Stay tuned because there will be more coming up. I was excited enough about these drugs that I went to the first part of a seminar on new developments with GLP-1 receptor agonists. I could only go to the first three talks because I had more pressing needs at other seminars going on simultaneously. Dr. Kathleen Dungan from Ohio State discussed differentiating current and emerging GLP-1 RA . She felt that in Type II diabetes these drugs are strong hemoglobin A1c lowering agents, they show little weight gain and little hypoglycemia. The main side effect is GI upset as I mentioned. Exenatide is given twice per day, liraglutide is given once per day and exenatide QW can be given weekly although it sounds as though it might be somewhat painfu Continue reading >>

A1c 7.3 - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

A1c 7.3 - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. 6 months ago my A1C was 6.8. Last check was 7.3:( This is the first time I ever went over 7.0 I was on met 500x2, now the doc upped it to 1000x2 2 weeks ago. How long before I see any real results? Doc said if this dosage doesn't work with diet and exercise, (2 miles a day walking) it might be time for insulin!!! I am not wanting to do that? I see a lot of you take multiple types of meds? Isn't there something in between Metformin and insulin. I know weight loss will bring it down, and I am working on that. I hate to be consistently in the upper 6's for A1C's. Tell us about your diet. A days worth of meals, please. What are your fasting numbers like? Post meal? Should you need to go on insulin, a long acting onece or twice per day long acting insulin such as Lantus or Levemir is very effective and not a life changer. Except for the positive in that you can have great control. 6.8 to 7.3 isn't all that big a jump given the nature of the test. Weight loss is a dream they feed you. Supposed to cure high sugars, back aches, and get you your choice of mates. Didn't happen for me or anyone else I know. My guess is the met may work and you need less carbs and more exercise. English muffin with cheese, bacon or sausage for breakfast. A hand full of strawberries. A couple of hand fulls of peanuts in between. Turkey/swiss sandwich on wheat with mustard. Apple or orange. Diet coke for lunch. Grilled chicken or pork chops for dinner. Salad. Tea or water. Sometimes a small amount of potato's or pasta. (less than a cup) By the way, my fbg is usually between 125-135, and I have seen post meals jump as high Continue reading >>

Diabetes Simplified: A1c Testing

Diabetes Simplified: A1c Testing

By Wil Dubois “Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who’s the best-controlled of all?” —what the Wicked Queen would have asked if she’d had diabetes instead of vanity issues If you’ve had diabetes for any time at all, you’ve probably heard of the A1C test. Sometimes, it’s also called the HbA1c test, the Hemoglobin A1c test, or the glycated hemoglobin test. They’re all the same thing. This is a lab test that allows your doctor, by consulting with a magic mirror, to determine how well your diabetes has been controlled, night and day, for the last three months. If that’s not black magic, I don’t know what is. Of course, as sci-fi writer Arthur C. Clarke famously said, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” The A1C has become the widely accepted benchmark for diabetes control. It’s used to classify who is in control and who is not, and to quantify the risk levels of those not in-target. The higher the A1C, the greater the risk of complications. The A1C is now also used diagnostically, with A1C scores actually used to diagnose new-onset diabetes. The A1C Test: How Does It Work? Well, like I said, it’s magic: in this case, the magic of biochemistry. The test measures the average blood sugar level for the past three months. It can do this because glucose sticks to red blood cells, just like powdered sugar sticks to freshly-fried doughnut holes. The result of the test is expressed as a percentage: 6.2 percent…7.8 percent…8.3 percent…9.6 percent…12.4 percent…and so on. Most A1C scores are only expressed in tenths of a percent, but some labs report twentieths, as well, so you might see an A1C of 6.79 percent or 8.32 percent. Wait a sec. A percentage of what, exactly? The percentage of hemoglobin in the sample of red Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

The hemoglobin A1c test tells you your average level of blood sugar over the past 2 to 3 months. It's also called HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, and glycohemoglobin. People who have diabetes need this test regularly to see if their levels are staying within range. It can tell if you need to adjust your diabetes medicines. The A1c test is also used to diagnose diabetes. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells. It gives blood its red color, and it’s job is to carry oxygen throughout your body. The sugar in your blood is called glucose. When glucose builds up in your blood, it binds to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. The A1c test measures how much glucose is bound. Red blood cells live for about 3 months, so the test shows the average level of glucose in your blood for the past 3 months. If your glucose levels have been high over recent weeks, your hemoglobin A1c test will be higher. For people without diabetes, the normal range for the hemoglobin A1c level is between 4% and 5.6%. Hemoglobin A1c levels between 5.7% and 6.4% mean you have a higher change of getting of diabetes. Levels of 6.5% or higher mean you have diabetes. The target A1c level for people with diabetes is usually less than 7%. The higher the hemoglobin A1c, the higher your risk of having complications related to diabetes. A combination of diet, exercise, and medication can bring your levels down. People with diabetes should have an A1c test every 3 months to make sure their blood sugar is in their target range. If your diabetes is under good control, you may be able to wait longer between the blood tests. But experts recommend checking at least two times a year. People with diseases affecting hemoglobin, such as anemia, may get misleading results with this test. Other things that can Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

Unplanned Pregnancy With A Starting A1c Of 7.2

Unplanned Pregnancy With A Starting A1c Of 7.2

Unplanned pregnancy with a starting A1C of 7.2 I just found out Im Pregnant (approximately 5 weeks) and my last a1c was 7.2. I am on a Medtronic pump and CGM and am working to get my a1c down, but in my 27 years of being T1 its never been below 7. I havent been able to get in to see my endo or a high risk specialty OB yet (due to awful government health insurance). A lot of the discussions Ive been ready are all with lower levels and healthy pregnancy. Im not lazy by any means and work really hard to keep my numbers in check, but I also work 2 very fast paced hectic jobs so its hard For me to keep my bg so low to maintain under a 6 That I wont drop into hypos while working. Is it possible to have a healthy pregnancy and baby with an a1c around 7? Hi @Amber.marie welcome to TuDiabetes! Weve had a lot of women post here about pregnancy with a1cs not exactly where theyd like it to be and things turned out fine. I did a search of "unplanned pregnancy and heres what came up I am 8 weeks pregnant now, but my a1c is 7.3. I live in Japan, so maybe my doctors have different expectations, but my Endo said this was fine. Of course I dont want it to go higher either. My last pregnancy my a1c wasnt ideal either, and of course all the changing insulin needs added challenges. My baby was 10lb 4 oz, vaginal delivery, NO epidural. I wouldnt want to do that again, but now I have a perfectly healthy and happy toddler. Try not to worry too much, that wont help either. Do what you can, and enjoy your pregnancy! Congratulations! Continue reading >>

My Hba1c Is 7.3 Is It Normal Or Not If Not Then What I Have To Do Suggest Some Advice

My Hba1c Is 7.3 Is It Normal Or Not If Not Then What I Have To Do Suggest Some Advice

my HBA1C is 7.3 is it normal or not if not then what I have to do suggest some advice my HBA1C is 7.3 is it normal or not if not then what I have to do suggest some advice My HBA1C is 7.3 is it normal or not if not then what I have to do Moderator Type1 - Minimed 640G - Enlite CGM You need to make an appointment to see your GP. Did your doctor not discuss the results of your A1C when you received this? D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 No it is high. Possibly cut carbohydrates from your diet and do a fair bit of exercise. My wife did and lowered her A1c from 6.2% to 5.5% (which is still not normal but a lot better). My HBA1C is 7.3 is it normal or not if not then what I have to do If your doctor gave you this A1c, which is above the generally accepted >6.5 diabetic level, it should have come with an explanation and direction. Most of us take a good look at our diet to address carb intake, and exercise to help use insulin/glucose more efficiently. Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy Your number would be considered above normal. Contact your medical team for guidelines to address the problem. Be mindful that a "Healthy Diet" is not always a good Way of Eating for a diabetic. Foods made with grans (even whole grain) are very high in carbohydrates. Develop a schedule for testing your Blood Glucose Levels several times a day. A 7.3 A1C is definitely high, but is this a repeated high reading or a 1st reading in the diabetic range. These are things to be discussed with your Medical Professional. DIABETES DAILY is a fantastic source of support and information about Diabetes. There are folks here who have over 50 years of experience dealing with their own Diabetes, and do not mind sharing their knowledge of and experiences of Diabetes. A1C--- Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Score On The A1c Diabetes Test?

What Is A Good Score On The A1c Diabetes Test?

Normal A1C level can range from 4.5 to 6 percent. Someone who's had uncontrolled diabetes for a long time can have an A1C level above 9 percent. A1C test is used to diagnose diabetes, an A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate dates indicates diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which is high risk of developing diabetes. For most people who have previously diagnosed diabetes, an A1C level of 7 percent or less is a common treatment target. Higher targets may be chosen in some individuals. If your A1C level is above your target, your doctor may recommend a change in your diabetes treatment plan. Remember, the higher your A1C level, the higher your risk of diabetes complications. A good score on the A1C test depends on whether you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes. For those who do not have diabetes, a score of less than 5.7% is considered normal, while 5.7% to 6.4% indicates prediabetes and 6.5% or higher means you have diabetes. If you already have diabetes, a score of 7% or lower is desired. You and your doctor can decide what score is best for you. The A1C diabetes test is a way to get an average of how well your blood sugar has been controlled for the past three months. The standard A1C goal for most people with diabetes is less than 7%. However, the goal may be individualized or may be different for some people, especially older adults, people with heart disease or those who are prone to frequent low blood glucose. It's a good idea to find out what your A1C goal should be from your healthcare provider and then use that as a benchmark for your A1C results. No one quite agrees on where your A1C score should be, but we all agree on where it shouldn’t be. The scale does not look anything like the BGL numbers you are used Continue reading >>

Translating A1c To A Blood Sugar Level

Translating A1c To A Blood Sugar Level

In the USA, doctors recommend that you have your Hemoglobin A1c measured at least twice per year. This simple blood test will tell you an approximation of your blood sugar control for the past 3 months based on the amount of Advanced Glycogenated End-Products (AGEs) that have accumulated in your blood. The higher your blood sugar levels are, the more AGEs are present. AGEs are also responsible for the development of complications such as retinopathy and neuropathy, because that accumulation will build and irritate crucial nerve-endings. To help people with diabetes understanding their A1C in real day-to-day terms, the medical world has developed the eAG measurement. Estimated Average Glucose.Your eAG will give your A1C reading in a blood sugar level of milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) just like youre used to seeing on your glucose meter. The American Diabetes Association has this easy calculator, allowing you to enter and translate your latest A1C to your eAG . What can you do with that information? It is recommended that people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes achieve an A1C of 7.0 percent or lower for optimal health, and the prevention of complications. This translates to an average blood sugar before and between meals around 70 to 130 mg/dL. And after meals, under 180 mg/dL. For pregnancy with diabetes, an A1C lower than 6.5 percent is imperative for the healthy development of your baby, and your own health and safety. Post-meal blood sugars for pregnant women is suggested at lower than 120 mg/dL. A non-diabetics A1C is typically around 5.0 percent. Adjust your medications!Talk to your doctor about your insulin doses or oral medications . If your A1C is higher than 7.0 percent, chances are your body needs more insulin at certain times of the day. This can be achieved Continue reading >>

Misunderstanding Ukpds - 7% Is Not A Good A1c.

Misunderstanding Ukpds - 7% Is Not A Good A1c.

The ADA board is full of people with A1c test results over 7% whose doctors tell them they are doing fine. They aren't. The doctors who tell them this are as irresponsible as if they told them not to worry about a "touch of cancer." My guess is that uneducated doctors think an A1c near 7% is "fine" because they've only read the one line summary of the findings of the UKPDS. That "25 words or less" version is that people with Type 2 Diabetes who attained A1cs of 7% reduced the incidence of complications. What this summary statement ignores, is that UKPDS also showed that, while the rate of complications in the population with A1cs of 7% was better than that in the population with A1cs of 9%, people with those 7% A1cs still developed microvascular complications at a very significant rate, and, even more importantly, they had not decreased their likelihood of dying from a heart attack or stroke. Here's what the actual findings published in the British Medical Journal said: Each 1% reduction in updated mean HbA1c was associated with reductions in risk of 21% for any end point related to diabetes . . . No threshold of risk was observed for any end point. [i.e. this stayed true as the A1cs continued to drop] . . .Any reduction in HbA1c is likely to reduce the risk of complications, with the lowest risk being in those with HbA1c values in the normal range (<6.0%)." Does this sound to you like 7% is a good A1c? I don't think so. Even more significant is that other studies show that to decrease the incidence of cardiovascular "incidents" i.e. heart attack and stroke, you need to lower A1c far below 7%. The chart below, derived from the huge EPIC-Norfolk study makes it very clear that the risk of heart attack DEATH has already doubled at an A1c 6%. (from Medscape New Avenues for Continue reading >>

A1c Calculator*

A1c Calculator*

Average blood glucose and the A1C test Your A1C test result (also known as HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) can be a good general gauge of your diabetes control, because it provides an average blood glucose level over the past few months. Unlike daily blood glucose test results, which are reported as mg/dL, A1C is reported as a percentage. This can make it difficult to understand the relationship between the two. For example, if you check blood glucose 100 times in a month, and your average result is 190 mg/dL this would lead to an A1C of approximately 8.2%, which is above the target of 7% or lower recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for many adults who are not pregnant. For some people, a tighter goal of 6.5% may be appropriate, and for others, a less stringent goal such as 8% may be better.1 Talk to your doctor about the right goal for you. GET YOURS FREE The calculation below is provided to illustrate the relationship between A1C and average blood glucose levels. This calculation is not meant to replace an actual lab A1C result, but to help you better understand the relationship between your test results and your A1C. Use this information to become more familiar with the relationship between average blood glucose levels and A1C—never as a basis for changing your disease management. See how average daily blood sugar may correlate to A1C levels.2 Enter your average blood sugar reading and click Calculate. *Please discuss this additional information with your healthcare provider to gain a better understanding of your overall diabetes management plan. The calculation should not be used to make therapy decisions or changes. What is A1C? Performed by your doctor during your regular visits, your A1C test measures your average blood sugar levels by taking a Continue reading >>

Elderly A1c Targets: Should Older People Have More Relaxed Glucose Goals?

Elderly A1c Targets: Should Older People Have More Relaxed Glucose Goals?

You may have read that the lower your A1C level, the better. For best health, people with diabetes should aim for glucose as close to normal as possible. But some new research shows this may not be true for older people. According to these studies, seniors could decide not to shoot for tight control of blood sugar or cholesterol. One study from Japan showed that lower HbA1c levels (a measure of average glucose control over the previous 2–3 months) were actually linked with an increased the risk of frailty in older adults. Frailty was measured in the study as how much help a person needs in living, and how poorly he or she recovers from an illness or injury. Toshihiko Yanase, MD, PhD of Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Japan, reported, “The risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as high blood glucose, obesity, high cholesterol, and hypertension, in middle age may shift from an unfavorable risk to favorable factors in old age.” The study was published in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation and reported by the online site Healio.com. Yanase and colleagues analyzed data from 132 adults aged at least 65 years with Type 2 diabetes Average age was 78. The subjects had had diabetes for an average of 17 years and their mean A1C was 7.3%. The subjects were categorized as frail or not on a 9-point clinical frailty scale (CFS). The CFS goes from 1 (very fit) to 9 (terminally ill). People who rated 5 or higher were classed as frail. Seventy-seven were not frail; 55 were. In those with higher frailty scores, HbA1c levels were found to be significantly lower. The causes of frailty are not well understood. In men, frailty is strongly associated with loss of muscle mass. As you get weaker and thinner, you become more fragile. The same is probably true of women, although Continue reading >>

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