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65 Facts About Diabetes

Health Facts: 67 Facts About Health Factslides

Health Facts: 67 Facts About Health Factslides

A lack of exercise is now causing as many deaths as smoking across the world, a study suggests. People who regularly eat dinner or breakfast in restaurants double their risk of becoming obese. Farting helps reduce high blood pressure and is good for your health. Laughing 100 times is equivalent to 15 minutes of exercise on a stationary bicycle. Sitting for more than three hours a day can cut two years off a person's life expectancy. Over 30% of cancer could be prevented by avoiding tobacco and alcohol, having a healthy diet and physical activity. Sleeping less than 7 hours each night reduces your life expectancy. 1 Can of Soda a day increases your chances of getting type 2 diabetes by 22%. There are more skin cancer cases due to indoor tanning than lung cancer cases due to smoking. McDonalds' Caesar salad is more fattening than their hamburger. Exercise, like walking, can reduce breast cancer risk by 25%. A Father's Diet Before Conception Plays a Crucial Role in a Child's Health. Severe Depression can cause us to biologically age more by increasing the aging process in cells. Chicken contains 266% more fat than it did 40 years ago. Heavy marijuana smokers are at risk for some of the same health effects as cigarette smokers, like bronchitis and other respiratory illnesses. Constipation-related health-care costs total US$6.9 billion per year in the U.S. On average, people who complain live longer. Releasing the tension increases immunity and boosts their health. 60% of people needing mental health services in the U.S. don't get it, often because of the stigma of seeking help. The U.S. spends US$30 per American per year of foreign aid on health, which can buy enough measles vaccines for 120 children. The U.S. spends more money per person on healthcare than any other devel Continue reading >>

Diabetes Statistics, Facts And Myths

Diabetes Statistics, Facts And Myths

Statistics from the 2014 USA national diabetes fact sheet from the CDC's National Diabetes Report . 29.1 million US children and adults (9.3% of the population) have diabetes. This is a rise from 25.8 million (8.5%) in 2011. Researchers from the Jefferson School of Population Health (Philadelphia, PA) published a study which estimates that by 2025 there could be 53.1 million people with diabetes . 21 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes (a rise from 18.8 million in 2011). About 8.1 million people with diabetes have not been diagnosed (a rise from 7 million in 2011). This equates to 27.8% of people with diabetes currently being undiagnosed. Diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes among people aged 20 years or older, US, 2012 About 86 million Americans aged 20 years or olderhave prediabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or more were newly diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. 208,000 (0.25%) people younger than 20 years have diabetes. Approximately 1 in every 400 kids and teenagers has diabetes. 12.3% of people aged 20+ years have diabetes; a total of 28.9 million individuals. 25.9% of people aged 65+ years have diabetes; a total of 11.2 million people. 13.6% of men have diabetes; a total of 15.5 million people (a rise from 11.8% in 2010). 11.2% of women have diabetes; a total of 13.4 million people (a rise from 10.8 in 2010). In the United Kingdom there are about 3.8 million people with diabetes, according to the National Health Service. Diabetes UK, a charity, believes this number will jump to 6.2 million by 2035, and the National Health Service will be spending as much as 17% of its health care budget on diabetes by then. Diabetes is rapidly spreading in Southeast Asia as people embrace American fast foods, such as hamburgers, hot dogs, French fries and pizza. M Continue reading >>

Fast Facts

Fast Facts

Each year since 1984, the West Virginia Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System has measured a range of risk factors that can affect our health. This report presents state survey results for the year 2015 as well as county data combined for the latest available five years (2011 through 2015). The survey is conducted by telephone and represents a collaborative effort between the West Virginia Health Statistics Center (WVHSC) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. Standardized survey methods are provided by the CDC. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, and several U.S. territories now participate in the system, known as the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). The information in this document serves as a resource for governments, business leaders, schools, and community groups, all of which are helping to shape the health of West Virginia. ​Health Status West Virginia had the highest prevalence in the nation of adults reporting fair or poor health (25.9%). Approximately 18.6% reported poor physical health for at least 14 days in the past 30 days 15.6% reported poor mental health at least 14 days in the past 30 days. Prediabetes Prevalence of prediabetes – 9.7% (over 1 in 11 or about 119,848 adults) Prevalence of high blood pressure among those with prediabetes – 64.0% Prevalence of overweight or obese among those with prediabetes – 83.1% Prevalence of physical inactivity among those with prediabetes – 35.6% ​Weight Status The prevalence of obesity in West Virginia was 35.6%, the fourth highest in the nation. More than two-thirds (71.1%) of West Virginia adults were either overweight or obese, highest in the U.S. ​​Diabetes More than 1 in 7 West Virginia adults had diabetes (14.5%) which ranked West Virgin Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetes

Facts About Diabetes

Corrections, comments, pictures, ect., click here to email the Website Administrator to help support this website LIONS DIABETES AWARENESS FOUNDATION OF MULTIPLE DISTRICT 35 Data from the 2007 National Diabetes Fact Sheet Total: 23.6 million children and adults in the United States—7.8% of the population—have diabetes. Diagnosed: 17.9 million people Undiagnosed: 5.7 million people Pre-diabetes: 57 million people New Cases: 1.6 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older each year. Total prevalence of diabetes Under 20 years of age 186,300, or 0.22% of all people in this age group have diabetes About 1 in every 400 to 600 children and adolescents has type 1 diabetes About 2 million adolescents aged 12-19 have pre-diabetes Age 20 years or older 23.5 million, or 10.7% of all people in this age group have diabetes Age 60 years or older 12.2 million, or 23.1% of all people in this age group have diabetes Men 12.0 million, or 11.2% of all men aged 20 years or older have diabetes Women 11.5 million, or 10.2% of all women aged 20 years or older have diabetes Race and ethnic differences in prevalence of diagnosed diabetes After adjusting for population age differences, 2004-2006 national survey data for people diagnosed with diabetes, aged 20 years or older include the following prevalence by race/ethnicity: 6.6% of non-Hispanic whites 7.5% of Asian Americans 11.8% of non-Hispanic blacks 10.4% of Hispanics Among Hispanics rates were: 8.2% for Cubans 11.9% for Mexican Americans 12.6% for Puerto Ricans. Morbidity and Mortality Deaths Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death listed on U.S. death certificates in 2006. This ranking is based on the 72,507 death certificates in 2006 in which diabetes was listed as the underlying cause of dea Continue reading >>

10 Facts About Diabetes

10 Facts About Diabetes

There is an emerging global epidemic of diabetes that can be traced back to rapid increases in overweight, obesity and physical inactivity. Total deaths from diabetes are projected to rise by more than 50% in the next 10 years. Most notably, they are projected to increase by over 80% in upper-middle income countries. Continue reading >>

25 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

25 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

Trivia can be fun and interesting, especially when you are learning about something that is close to home. Whether you have diabetes or know someone who does, you might want to learn some interesting facts about this disease. Seeing how greatly treatment has evolved can be empowering. In addition, learning more about diabetes can help to increase your awareness and motivate you to take control. The earliest known written record that likely referred to diabetes was in 1500 B.C in the Egyptian Ebers papyrus. It referred to the symptoms of frequent urination. Diabetes symptoms such as thirst, weight loss, and excess urination were recognized for more than 1200 years before the disease was named. The Greek physician Aretaeus (30-90CE) was credited with coming up with the name "diabetes." He recorded a disease with symptoms such as constant thirst (polydipsia), excessive urination (polyuria) and weight loss. He named the condition "diabetes," meaning "a flowing through." Dr. Thomas Willis (1621-1675) called diabetes the "pissing evil" and described the urine of people with type 2 diabetes as "wonderfully sweet, as if it was imbued with honey or sugar." He was also the first to describe pain and stinging from nerve damage due to diabetes. In ancient times, doctors would test for diabetes by tasting urine to see if it was sweet. People who tasted urine to check for diabetes were called "water tasters." Other diagnostic measures included checking to see if urine attracted ants or flies. In the late 1850's, a French physician named Priorry advised his patients with diabetes to eatlarge quantities of sugar. Obviously, that method of treatment did not last, as sugar increases blood sugars. Back in the day, there were no blood glucose meters. Instead, they tested for blood sugar u Continue reading >>

64 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

64 Interesting Facts About Diabetes

The word “diabetes” is Greek for “siphon,” which refers to the copious urine of uncontrolled diabetes. “Mellitus” is Latin for “honey” or “sweet,” a name added when physicians discovered that the urine from people with diabetes is sweet with glucose.[8] Scientists predict that there may be 30 million new cases of diabetes in China alone by 2025.[1] The earliest recorded mention of a disease that can be recognized as diabetes is found in the Ebers papyrus (1500 B.C.), which includes directions for several mixtures that could “remove the urine, which runs too often.”[1] The name “diabetes” is attributed to the famed Greek physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia who practiced in the first century A.D. He believed that diabetes was caused by snakebite.[1] William Cullen (1710-1790), a professor of chemistry and medicine in Scotland, is responsible for adding the term “mellitus” (“sweet” or “honey-like”) to the word diabetes.[1] Insulin was coined from the Latin insula (“island”) because the hormone is secreted by the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas.[9] In 1889, Oskar Minkowski (1858-191931) discovered the link between diabetes and the pancreas (pan - “all” + kreas - “flesh) when a dog from which he removed the pancreas developed diabetes.[1] Before the discovery of insulin, surgeons rarely operated on diabetic patients with gangrene because the patients typically would not heal and would inevitably die. On occasion, an area of gangrene would “auto-amputate,” meaning it would dry up and fall off.[1] Before the discovery of insulin in 1921, physicians would often put their patients on starvation or semi-starvation diets, recommending they eat only foods such as oatmeal.[1] In 1996, a 16-year-old girl with diabetes died at he Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Facts About Diabetes

5 Surprising Facts About Diabetes

"Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in children after asthma, but the percentage of kids who have it is still relatively low," says Parents advisor Lori Laffel, MD, chief of the pediatric, adolescent, and young-adult section at Harvard's Joslin Diabetes Center. Here are five important truths about this serious illness. Fact: Most Children Who Get Diabetes Aren't Fat Type 2 diabetes, which is usually triggered by obesity, has gotten a lot of press because it used to strike only adults and is now being diagnosed in kids as young as 6, says Dr. Laffel. Alarming as that is, a greater number of kids get type 1, an autoimmune disease that's been rising 4 percent a year since the 1970s -- especially in young kids. Only 3,700 children are diagnosed with type 2 every year compared with 15,000 who develop type 1, according to a large study that provides the first detailed look at diabetes in U.S. kids. In many ways, the two forms of diabetes are very different. In type 1, which has no known cause, the immune system mistakenly destroys healthy cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, the hormone that helps the body get energy from food. To make up for the shortfall, children typically need injections of insulin several times a day. In type 2, the pancreas usually makes plenty of insulin (at least at first), but cells throughout the body have trouble using it -- a condition known as insulin resistance. But no matter what the type, diabetes causes high blood-sugar levels when glucose from food -- the body's equivalent of gasoline for a car -- builds up because it can't get into cells without insulin. Over time, excess blood sugar can damage organs and tissues throughout the body. Fact: White Children Are at the Highest Risk Many people have heard that diabetes is Continue reading >>

2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet

2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Total: 25.8 million people, or 8.3% of the population, have diabetes. Diagnosed and Undiagnosed Diabetes Among People Aged 20 years or older, United States, 2010 Age 20 years or older: 25.6 million, or 11.3% of all people in this age group, have diabetes. Age 65 years or older: 10.9 million, or 26.9% of all people in this age group, have diabetes. Men: 13.0 million, or 11.8% of all men aged 20 years or older, have diabetes. Women: 12.6 million, or 10.8% of all women aged 20 years or older, have diabetes. Non-Hispanic whites: 15.7 million, or 10.2% of all non-Hispanic whites aged 20 years or older, have diabetes. Non-Hispanic blacks: 4.9 million, or 18.7% of all non-Hispanic blacks aged 20 years or older, have diabetes. Diagnosed Diabetes Among People Younger Than 20 Years of Age, United States, 2010 About 215,000 people younger than 20 years have diabetes (type 1 or type 2). This represents 0.26% of all people in this age group. Estimates of undiagnosed diabetes are unavailable for this age group. About one in 400 children and adolescents has diabetes. Diagnosed Diabetes Racial and Ethnic Differences Hispanic/Latino Americans are 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes than non-Hispanic whites. African Americans are 1.8 times more likely to have diabetes than non-Hispanic whites There are 79 million Americans aged 20 years or older with prediabetes. Gestational Diabetes in the United States Prior studies have shown women who have had gestational diabetes are at risk (of up to 60%) for developing diabetes in the next 10 to 20 years. New diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes will increase the proportion of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Using these new diagnostic criteria, an international, multic Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Older Adults

Diabetes In Older Adults

What is the epidemiology and pathogenesis of diabetes in older adults? According to the most recent surveillance data, the prevalence of diabetes among U.S. adults aged ≥65 years varies from 22 to 33%, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fast Facts - Cnn

Diabetes Fast Facts - Cnn

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. Here's a look at diabetes, a disease that affects millions of people around the world. Diabetes is characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. The disease can lead to serious complications such as blindness, kidney damage, cardiovascular disease, limb amputations and premature death. There are several types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. Prediabetes occurs when blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Before developing Type 2 diabetes, people almost always have prediabetes. Research has shown that some long-term damage to the body may occur during prediabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops when the body's immune system destroys pancreatic beta cells, the only cells in the body that make insulin. This form of diabetes usually strikes children and young adults. Only 5-10% of people with diabetes have Type 1. Risk factors for Type 1 diabetes may be autoimmune, genetic or environmental. There is no known way to prevent Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells do not use insulin properly. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and in adults, it accounts for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. It is associated with older age, obesity, family history, physical inactivity and race/ethnicity. It is more common in African Americans, Latino Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, although still rare, is being diagnosed more frequently. Gestational diabetes is a form Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or olderwith diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of theseven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Why are people with diabetes at increased risk for CVD? Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. That's because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes,may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles. Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides Patients with diabetes often have unhealthy cholesterol levels including high LDL ("bad") cholesterol, low HDL ("good") cholesterol, and high triglycerides. This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia in those patients with diabetes. Learn more about cholesterol abnormalities as they relate to diabetes. Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has been strongly associated with insulin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

About Diabetes

About Diabetes

Diabetes in the United States | Race for a Cure | Medical Expenditures Attributed to Diabetes Indirect Costs of Diabetes Total: 29.1 million people - 9.3 percent of the population--have diabetes. Of those with diabetes, approximately 21 million are diagnosed while 8.1 million remain undiagnosed. Type 1 Diabetes (Body cannot produce insulin): 5 percent of cases. Type 2 Diabetes (Body fails to use insulin properly): 90-95 percent of cases. In 2012, about 208,000 people younger than 20 years have diagnosed diabetes (type 1 or type 2). This represents 0.25 percent of all people in this age group. During 2008–2009, an estimated 18,436 people younger than 20 years in the United States were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes annually, and 5,089 people younger than 20 years were newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes annually. Compared with other groups, non-Hispanic white children and adolescents had the highest rate of new cases of type 1 diabetes. In 2012, 1.7 million new diabetes cases were reported for people 20 years and older. From 2009-2012, 37 percent of U.S. adults aged 20 years or older had prediabetes (51 perecent of those aged 65 years or older). Applying this percentage to the entire U.S. population in 2012 yields an estimated 86 million Americans aged 20 years or older with prediabetes. The rates of diagnosed diabetes by race/ethnic background are: 7.6 percent of non-Hispanic whites; 9 percent of Asian Americans; 12.8 percent of Hispanics; 13.2 percent of non-Hispanic blacks; 15.9 percent of American Indians/Alaskan Natives. In 2012 alone, an estimated $245 billion was spent on the direct (medical) and indirect (loss of productivity) costs of diabetes. Every 17 seconds, another individual is diagnosed with diabetes. Each day approximately 5,082 people are diagn Continue reading >>

6 Surprising Facts About Diabetes & Heart Disease

6 Surprising Facts About Diabetes & Heart Disease

6 Surprising Facts About Diabetes & Heart Disease Heart disease and type 2 diabetes are two of the most prevalent chronic health conditions in adult Americans. Many of my patients at Phoenix Heart Center have been diagnosed with both of these health problems. The good news is that heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes can be managed with the help of your physician. 6 Facts About Diabetes & Cardiovascular Disease Heart diseases and stroke are the 1 causes of death and disability among people with type 2 diabetes. In fact, at least 65 percent of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke. American Heart Association Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease or a stroke than adults without diabetes. American Heart Association High blood glucose in adults with diabetesincreasesthe risk for heartattack, stroke, angina, andcoronary artery disease. National Diabetes Education Program Smoking doubles the risk of heart disease in people with diabetes. National Diabetes Education Program A large NIH-sponsored study, the Diabetes Prevention Program, and other studies have proven that modest weight reduction and a 30-minute exercise routine five days a week can reduce the development of type 2 diabetes over three years by more than 50 percent. Joslin Diabetes Center Optimal control of LDL-cholesterol (the so-called bad cholesterol) and blood pressure can prevent adverse cardiovascular outcomes by 30 to 50 percent. Joslin Diabetes Center You Have the Ability to Change Your Course. As you can see from many of these facts, diabetes and heart disease can oftentimes be managed. Making lifestyle changes like dieting, exercise, and choosing not to smoke may prolong your lifespan and change your outcome. Are you concerne Continue reading >>

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