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6.7 A1c Equals

Pam Spaulding: July 2012

Pam Spaulding: July 2012

Recovering political junkie, human (and pit bull) rights advocate, and Journey fan...so there. If you ever wanted me to shut up, you're getting your wish... I've been having voice problems off and on for the last few weeks - first it began breaking up (cracking, dropping out words mid-sentence), then a loss of range and clarity, and now it has become painful to talk for extended periods (like in meetings, or even sing to my beloved Journey in the car). I'm hoarse almost all the time. I dug around and on RA Warrior I discovered that it could be vocal cord (cricoarytenoid) arthritis, a result of rheumatoid arthritis attacking the cricoarytenoid joints near your larynx. So, how common is cricoarytenoid Rheumatoid Arthritis? Very. Arthritis materials estimate the rate of cricoarytenoid involvement to be anywhere between 17 and 75%. No wonder people are confused. At least 35% of RAers complain of hoarseness, a common symptom of cricoarytenoid RA. But wait! Post mortem studies range from 45 88%. I have read a couple of journal articles which find autopsy evidence of laryngeal Rheumatoid Arthritis in 87% of patients. An American College of Rheumatology report found that 7 out of 8 RA patients showed histopathologic changes postmortem. They stated, Arthritis of the cricoarytenoid joint occurs much more frequently in patients with rheumatoid disease than has generally been suspected. In the last week it has felt like there is always something in my throat and surrounding neck muscles are hurting. I mostly only speak if spoken to at this point. I stay off of the phone. It's getting scary. I asked my rheumatologist about it and so she's slotting me in this week. Cricoarytenoid arthritis can impede breathing, so ignoring these symptoms isn't a good idea. But it would have been goo Continue reading >>

Why Raise Your A1c?

Why Raise Your A1c?

Have you been ordered by your doctor to get your A1C (HbA1c) level up? More people are having this confusing experience, as doctors try to implement the 2013 ADA treatment guidelines. Do these orders make sense? Not much, I’d say. What is happening here? In 2012, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) changed the targets doctors should aim for in treating diabetes. They went from a one-size-fits-all target of 7.0% HbA1c to a three-tiered guideline. HbA1c is the test that gives an idea of the average blood glucose level for the previous two months or so. An A1C of 7.0% equals an average blood glucose of around 154 mg/dl, and many people think that number is too high to protect against complications. So there was pressure to lower the guideline. At the same time, many older people found the 7.0% goal too strict. A few studies found an increased risk of falls in older people who run low glucose levels. There was concern about increased risk of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). As Diane Fennell wrote here, many think that aiming for lower A1C levels leads to an increase in low blood glucose episodes. As many readers commented, hypos are dangerous and unpleasant. For many, they are the worst fact of life with diabetes. So the experts finally recognized that one size does not fit all. Unfortunately, their new guidelines have been misunderstood by some doctors, leading to people being told to raise their A1C numbers, even if doing so increases their complication risk. According to the new guidelines, older or sicker people, or those with many hypoglycemic episodes, might shoot for 7.5% to 8.0%. Younger, healthier, people might want to get their A1C below 6.5%, or even lower. People in between on age and health mi Continue reading >>

Differential Effect Of Initiating Moderate Red Wine Consumption On 24-h Blood Pressure By Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genotypes: Randomized Trial In Type 2 Diabetes

Differential Effect Of Initiating Moderate Red Wine Consumption On 24-h Blood Pressure By Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genotypes: Randomized Trial In Type 2 Diabetes

Received 2015 February 25; Revised 2015 April 12; Accepted 2015 July 13. Copyright American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: [email protected] This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Observational studies report inconsistent associations between moderate alcohol intake and blood pressure (BP). In a sub-study of a larger randomized controlled trial, we assessed the effect of initiating moderate red wine consumption on 24-h BP recordings and the effect of a common genetic variant of alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) among patients with type 2 diabetes. Fifty-four type 2 diabetes, alcohol abstainers were randomized to consume 150ml/dinner dry red wine or mineral water. Both groups were guided to adhere to a Mediterranean diet, without caloric restriction. We measured 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) at baseline and after 6 months. Participants (age = 57 years; 85% men; mean 24-h BP = 129/77mm Hg) had 92% 6-month retention. After 6 months of intervention, the average 24-h BP did not differ between the wine and water groups. A transient decrease in BP was observed in the red wine group at midnight (34 hours after wine intake: systolic BP: red wine = 10.6mm Hg vs. mineral water = +2.3mm Hg; P = 0.031) and the following morning at 79 am (red wine: 6.2mm Hg vs. mineral water: +5.6mm Hg; P = 0.014). In a second post hoc sub-analysis among the red wine consumers, individuals who were homozygous for the gene encoding ADH1B*2 variant (Arg48His; rs1229984, TT, fast ethanol metabolizers), exhibited a reduction in mean 24-h systolic BP (8.0mm Hg vs. +3.7mm Hg; P = 0.002) and pulse pressure (3.8mm Hg vs. +1.2mm Hg; P = 0.032) compared to heterozygotes and those homozygous for the ADH1B*1 variant (CC, slow me Continue reading >>

Additional Customer Testimonials

Additional Customer Testimonials

The only chiropractor I will go to. My first experience with a chiropractor was painful. My husband convinced me to come to Dr. Mike, I explained how painful my first experience with a different chiropractor was. Dr. Mike listened to my concerns and used appropriate pain-free methods on me. My husband and I travel an hour and a half to come to Dr. Mike because he and his awesome staff are great at what they do. He also showed my husband some things to do to help me between visits, knowing we travel so far, that were easy to perform and very effective in helping my lower back pain. I definitely recommend Dr. Mike and staff. Theyre caring, supportive, and affordable! This was my first time to do The Standard Process 21-Day Purification Program. I had a hard time at first, I called the office of Dr. Mike and got lots of support and information. I learned about myself and about all the fruits and vegetables and how to eat healthy. It truly was a great learning experience for me. I am happy to say that my A1C went from 7.2 to 6.7, I am very happy about that. I want to thank Kathy, Liane and Dr. Mike for all their help and support during this process, without them I couldnt have made it. Thank You!!!!! - Brian Foust - Dr. Mike was referred to me by my wife about 14 years ago when we relocated to Columbus from Chicago. Ive had on and off again back pain since I was a teenager due to scoliosis. (not to mention a recent car accident that made things worse). Ive seen Chiropractors in N. Ohio, N. California, and Chicago. I believe Dr. Mike is not only the best Chiropractor Ive ever been to but a great person. He genuinely cares about each patient. More importantly, he produces positive results. His staff led by Cathy is always friendly, professional, and willing to help. I would Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Score On The A1c Diabetes Test?

What Is A Good Score On The A1c Diabetes Test?

Normal A1C level can range from 4.5 to 6 percent. Someone who's had uncontrolled diabetes for a long time can have an A1C level above 9 percent. A1C test is used to diagnose diabetes, an A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate dates indicates diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which is high risk of developing diabetes. For most people who have previously diagnosed diabetes, an A1C level of 7 percent or less is a common treatment target. Higher targets may be chosen in some individuals. If your A1C level is above your target, your doctor may recommend a change in your diabetes treatment plan. Remember, the higher your A1C level, the higher your risk of diabetes complications. A good score on the A1C test depends on whether you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes. For those who do not have diabetes, a score of less than 5.7% is considered normal, while 5.7% to 6.4% indicates prediabetes and 6.5% or higher means you have diabetes. If you already have diabetes, a score of 7% or lower is desired. You and your doctor can decide what score is best for you. The A1C diabetes test is a way to get an average of how well your blood sugar has been controlled for the past three months. The standard A1C goal for most people with diabetes is less than 7%. However, the goal may be individualized or may be different for some people, especially older adults, people with heart disease or those who are prone to frequent low blood glucose. It's a good idea to find out what your A1C goal should be from your healthcare provider and then use that as a benchmark for your A1C results. No one quite agrees on where your A1C score should be, but we all agree on where it shouldn’t be. The scale does not look anything like the BGL numbers you are used Continue reading >>

Blog Archives - The Diabetic Cyclist

Blog Archives - The Diabetic Cyclist

With a brisk wind and the temperature at 50 this afternoon, going for a run didn't sound to appealing. I'm definitely a hot and humid weather athlete, sweating and suffering is more appealing to me than the cold and wind. As my blood sugar started to creep up slowly after work I became more interested in running, with rain forecast for the next two days, today would be my last chance to get in a decent run. The plan was to run five miles at a relaxed pace, I need to run a relaxed first seven miles of my half marathon this Sunday. This afternoon I wanted to run at a 9 minute pace, Sunday my goal is to be at mile seven at the one hour mark. As my run began this afternoon my blood sugar was at 150 and trending up, I felt great and had an extra confidence boost knowing my blood sugar would be ok. The first half of my run was horrible, I felt good but a very cold head wind for almost three miles was painful. As I made the turn the wind was at my back and I felt amazing. I was relaxed and enjoying every step. As I hit the four mile mark I peaked at my watch and noticed I was running for 33 minutes. I would finish my run in 40 minutes, I really pushed the last mile which was mostly uphill. I felt great and wanted to test myself, I have had a tough time finishing strong when it comes to races. I was happy to see my blood sugar at 104 when I returned home, I grabbed a small protein snack and took some insulin before preparing my dinner. I'm happy with how well everything went this afternoon, the race Sunday is at 8am so none of what I did with my diabetes today will be used race day but I do have a ton of confidence heading in to the race. As far as running goes, I feel great, I feel strong and I'm very confident that I will be able to stick to my running plan and hopefully PR Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Metabolic Syndrome Beverly Thomassian

Diabetes Mellitus And Metabolic Syndrome Beverly Thomassian

39C H A P T E R 872 OVERVIEW OF DIABETES The global epidemic of diabetes will challenge our generation to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat this life long condi- tion. Every 10 seconds, two people develop diabetes and one per- son dies from diabetes-related causes. In 2007, 246 million peo- ple worldwide had diabetes. That number is expected to climb to 380 million by 2030.1 In most developed countries, diabetes is the fourth or fifth leading cause of death and there is concern that it will become an epidemic in many developing and newly indus- trialized nations. City dwellers are at especially high risk since they tend to be less physically active and are more likely to be obese as compared to their rural counterparts.2 Heart disease is the leading cause of death for all people with diabetes.1 Heart disease, coupled with the other long-term complications including kidney, eye, and nerve disease, results in disability, reduced life expectancy, and enor- mous hearth burdens for virtually every society.2 In 2007, the United Nations General Assembly recognized that diabetes “poses a severe risk for the families, Member States and the entire world†and passed a resolution declaring November 14 World Diabetes Day.3 In spite of this emerging epidemic, there is abundant evidence that diabetes can be prevented and its complications avoided. The challenge faced by health care providers is to increase awareness re- garding diabetes risk factors, promote early identification, and pro- vide treatment aimed at preventing complications and improving quality of life. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss (1) the natural history and pathophysiology of types 1 and 2 diabetes, (2) the relationship between insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease (CVD), (3) Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Early Insulin Treatment Equals Better Outcomes

Diabetes: Early Insulin Treatment Equals Better Outcomes

A recent Type 2 diabetes study found early insulin therapy to be as effective as 15 months of oral therapy, and it may improve the body's ability to produce insulin, according to a news release . Researchers from Ohio University and Western University of Health Sciences ' College of Osteopathic Medicine conducted a pilot study of 23 adults who were newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, and who were had early oral therapy. By the end of their study, the researchers saw significant improvements. The first step in Type 2 treatment is to have oral therapy, which suppresses glucose production by the liver. This is necessary because insulin, the hormone normally produced by the pancreas, is not produced in Type 2 patients, and is a vital part of the digestive system that allows the body to utilize glucose from carbohydrates in the food that you eat and it controls blood sugar levels. If diagnosed, patients can receive early insulin treatments, which may have less metabolic side effects. The pilot study was conducted in a series of successful cases which were completed at The Ohio University Diabetes Institute . In a controlled trial, the insulin-treated group's A1C levels decreased from 10.1 percent to 6.7 percent after 15 months, according to the researchers. TheA1Ctest is a common blood test used to diagnose Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and also to gauge how a patient is managing their diabetes. The group that received intensive oral therapy saw that their A1C levels dropped from 9.9 percent to 6.8 percent at 15 months. The researchers found that the intensive oral therapy group gained weight and the insulin-treated group lost an average of five pounds. "While the improvement in glucose was relatively comparable between the two groups, our findings support the idea that the Continue reading >>

Convert Hba1c To Average Blood Sugar Level

Convert Hba1c To Average Blood Sugar Level

Tweet Use this calculator to convert HbA1c to Average Blood Sugar Level. The HbA1c level in your blood indicates what your average blood glucose level has been in the past 2 to 3 months. Everyone, whether non-diabetic, pre-diabetic, type 1 diabetic or type 2 diabetic has some degree of sugar in their blood. To convert between mg/dl and mmol/L, use our blood sugar converter. You can then convert average blood glucose levels back to HbA1c units with the calculator below. mmol/L Recommended HbA1c ranges The recommended HbA1c range for most with diabetes is to keep the value under 48 mmols/mol (under 6.5% in the old percentage units). People at risk of hypoglycemia, or for whom such tight blood glucose regulation is not advised, may be advised to keep their HbA1c below 59 mmols/mol (under 7.5% in the old percentage units). Because the two tests measure two different things, the calculator can only give an estimate and therefore there will always be some discrepancy between the value provided by the calculator and actual lab test results. How accurate are the results? The calculator looks to provide an estimate of what your HbA1c value may be based upon your average blood glucose results and vice versa. It’s important to note that HbA1c and blood glucose tests measure different things. Blood glucose tests measure the concentration of glucose molecules in the blood at a single point in time. The HbA1c test measures the proportion of haemoglobin molecules in the blood that have become chemically bonded with glucose over a period of up to 3 months. However, the calculator serves as a useful guide which can give you a close indication of what your HbA1c result might be based on your blood glucose results? What can I learn from converting my average blood glucose level to HbA1c Continue reading >>

My A1c Test Showed My Number At 6.7, Can I Improve My Number With Diet And Exercise? I Do Not Want To Take Medication

My A1c Test Showed My Number At 6.7, Can I Improve My Number With Diet And Exercise? I Do Not Want To Take Medication

Please visit the new WebMD Message Boards to find answers and get support. My A1C test showed my number at 6.7, can I improve my number with diet and exercise? I do not want to take medication For someone who doesn't have diabetes, a normal A1C level can range from 4.5 to 6 percent. Someone who's had uncontrolled diabetes for a long time might have an A1C level above 8 percent. When the A1C test is used to diagnose diabetes, an A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. For most people who have previously diagnosed diabetes, an A1C level of 7 percent or less is a common treatment target. Higher targets may be chosen in some individuals. If your A1C level is above your target, your doctor may recommend a change in your diabetes treatment plan. Remember, the higher your A1C level, the higher your risk of diabetes complications. If this dose not show blue, just copy into google to the www. To open and read. PS yes get exercising and look up what to eat to get back on track, try googling the diabetes diet, you should find all the help you need. Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD User-generated content areas like communities, reviews, ratings, blogs, or WebMD Answers are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products th Continue reading >>

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

The A1C blood test is a simple test that analyzes your glucose (blood sugar) levels by measuring the amount of glycated hemoglobin in your blood. Hemoglobin is a protein in your red blood cells; when glucose enters the blood, it attaches to the hemoglobin. The result is glycated hemoglobin. The more glucose in your blood, the higher your glycated hemoglobin. The A1C is a valuable indicator of how well your diabetes management plan is working. While your individual A1C goal will depend on factors including your age and your personal medical profile, most people with diabetes aim to keep their A1C below 7 percent. By keeping your A1C number within your target range, you can reduce the risk of diabetes complications. While it is important to develop a long-term diabetes management plan with your physician, there are several steps you can take right away to help reduce your A1C. Small changes add up, so consider trying some of these strategies to lower your A1C this week. 1. Try Short Sessions of High Intensity Exercise According to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2015, type 2 diabetes patients who did 10 minutes of exercise three times a day, five days a week at 85 percent of their target heart rate had a twofold improvement in A1C levels compared to patients who exercised for 30 minutes a day at 65 percent of their target heart rate. Be sure to check with your doctor before trying high intensity exercise, and wear a heart rate monitor so you don’t overdo it. 2. Shrink Your Dinner Plate Instead of a large dinner plate for your meals, use a smaller salad plate. This simple swap can trick your eyes and brain into thinking you’re eating more than you really are, and you’ll feel satisfied with less food. It’s especially helpfu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The A1c Test: What Does It Tell You?

Diabetes And The A1c Test: What Does It Tell You?

The A1C test (also known as HbA1C, glycated hemoglobin or glycosylated hemoglobin) is a good general measure of diabetes care. While conventional home glucose monitoring measures a person’s blood sugar at a given moment, A1C levels indicate a person’s average blood glucose level over the past few months. Understanding A1C Numbers For a person without diabetes, a typical A1C level is about 5 percent. For someone with diabetes, experts disagree somewhat on what the A1C target should be. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends an A1C target of less than or equal to 7 percent. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists recommends a level of 6.5 percent or below. The ADA also emphasizes that A1C goals should be individualized. Those with diabetes should check with a healthcare professional to learn what their A1C targets should be. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) says that, in general, every percentage point drop in an A1C blood test results (e.g., from 8 percent to 7 percent) reduces the risk of eye, kidney and nerve disease by 40 percent. The chart below shows what the A1C means in terms of average blood glucose levels. An average blood glucose of 150 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter) translates into an A1C of about 7 percent. This is above normal, given that a diagnosis of diabetes is usually given when blood sugar levels reach about 126 mg/dL. Note that the A1C is not the same as the estimated average glucose (eAG), which is the two to three-month average in mg/dL, but the A1C directly correlates to the eAG. When you are testing your blood sugars daily, the numbers you see on your monitor are also measured in mg/dL. They reflect a moment in time and are not the same as your eAG. A1c to eAG Conversion Chart HbA1c or A1c eAG % mg/dl mmol/l Continue reading >>

A1c Test

A1c Test

Print Overview The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well you're managing your diabetes. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications. Why it's done An international committee of experts from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the International Diabetes Federation, recommend that the A1C test be the primary test used to diagnose prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. After a diabetes diagnosis, the A1C test is used to monitor your diabetes treatment plan. Since the A1C test measures your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months instead of your blood sugar level at a specific point in time, it is a better reflection of how well your diabetes treatment plan is working overall. Your doctor will likely use the A1C test when you're first diagnosed with diabetes. This also helps establish a baseline A1C level. The test may then need to be repeated while you're learning to control your blood sugar. Later, how often you need the A1C test depends on the type of diabetes you have, your treatment plan and how well you're managing your blood sugar. For example, the A1C test may be recommended: Once every year if you have prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes Twice a year if Continue reading >>

Understanding The New Hba1c Units For The Diagnosis Of Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding The New Hba1c Units For The Diagnosis Of Type 2 Diabetes

In the absence of overt symptoms of hyperglycaemia, the diagnosis of diabetes has been based on plasma glucose concentrations that are associated with an increased risk of its specific microvascular complications, in particular retinopathy.1,2 The precise criteria have always been determined by consensus among experts and are based principally on several large observational cohort studies. The criteria have been repeatedly modified over time as more high quality data have become available. Most recently many international diabetes societies have adopted the measurement of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) as a legitimate diagnostic test for the diagnosis of diabetes using a “cut point” for the diagnosis of ≥6.5%.3–5 Recently there has been a change in the reporting units for HbA1c from percent to mmol/mol that has been driven by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) and is linked to the standardisation of routine assays for HbA1c to a new reference method.6 The validity of the process has been accepted by many international diabetes societies (American Diabetes Association, Canadian Diabetes Society, European Association for the Study of Diabetes and International Diabetes Federation) as well as by the New Zealand Society for the Study of Diabetes (NZSSD).7 A NZSSD Working Party, made up of members representing clinicians, academics, laboratory staff, general practitioners and population health experts, has developed and now published a new position statement for the diagnosis of diabetes.7 This article explains the changes in use of HbA1c recommended in that statement and expands on the evidence behind these modifications. New units All methods used to measure HbA1c in New Zealand are now standardised through traceability to the IFCC reference me Continue reading >>

All Categories - Bootcamp For Betics

All Categories - Bootcamp For Betics

If your family is anything like mine, youll have ample opportunity to completely skyrocket your blood sugar levels tomorrow. When I was younger, heres what my Thanksgiving Day experience looked like: My family starts Thanksgiving day drinking mimosas and eating something luxurious like quiche with fruit while wearing our pajamas. Then, after breakfast, we munch on the pre-thanksgiving appetizers. Theres usually a cheese & cracker tray, a relish tray, cookies, at least three different kinds of chips, dip, salsa, pigs in a blanket, and, well, you know the drill. By the time Thanksgiving dinner is ready, Im usually too full to eat anything, but that doesnt stop me from eating a full plate of food or two, after which Im so exhausted and stuffed that I have to lay down and go to sleep. An hour or two later, I wake up and eat some pie. And ice cream. By this time, one of two things happens. Either my blood sugar goes extremely LOW because I took way too much insulin for all the food I ate, or, my blood sugar goes extremely HIGH because, even though I took the correct amount of insulin, the insulin just cant catch up with all the food Im eating. Now, over the last few years, Ive figured out how to protect my blood sugar from imminent annihilation by employing blood sugar stabilization techniques that Ive compiled into my new Thanksgiving Survival Guide. These techniques will work whether you take insulin or not. Photo credit: Continue reading >>

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