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6.7 A1c Equals

Pam Spaulding: July 2012

Pam Spaulding: July 2012

Recovering political junkie, human (and pit bull) rights advocate, and Journey fan...so there. If you ever wanted me to shut up, you're getting your wish... I've been having voice problems off and on for the last few weeks - first it began breaking up (cracking, dropping out words mid-sentence), then a loss of range and clarity, and now it has become painful to talk for extended periods (like in meetings, or even sing to my beloved Journey in the car). I'm hoarse almost all the time. I dug around and on RA Warrior I discovered that it could be vocal cord (cricoarytenoid) arthritis, a result of rheumatoid arthritis attacking the cricoarytenoid joints near your larynx. So, how common is cricoarytenoid Rheumatoid Arthritis? Very. Arthritis materials estimate the rate of cricoarytenoid involvement to be anywhere between 17 and 75%. No wonder people are confused. At least 35% of RAers complain of hoarseness, a common symptom of cricoarytenoid RA. But wait! Post mortem studies range from 45 88%. I have read a couple of journal articles which find autopsy evidence of laryngeal Rheumatoid Arthritis in 87% of patients. An American College of Rheumatology report found that 7 out of 8 RA patients showed histopathologic changes postmortem. They stated, Arthritis of the cricoarytenoid joint occurs much more frequently in patients with rheumatoid disease than has generally been suspected. In the last week it has felt like there is always something in my throat and surrounding neck muscles are hurting. I mostly only speak if spoken to at this point. I stay off of the phone. It's getting scary. I asked my rheumatologist about it and so she's slotting me in this week. Cricoarytenoid arthritis can impede breathing, so ignoring these symptoms isn't a good idea. But it would have been goo Continue reading >>

Can Trilipix Raise Blood Sugar In A Type Ii Diabetic. - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

Can Trilipix Raise Blood Sugar In A Type Ii Diabetic. - Diabetes - Type 2 - Medhelp

Can Trilipix raise blood sugar in a type II diabetic. I am a type II diabetic for 4 years now. I found out when I was at a weight of 295. I went on a diet and lost 35 pounds in about 4 months. I have kept my diabetes under control for the past 4 years by watching what I eat. I had my a1c checked in Dec. and it was 6.7. I very rarely check my blood sugar levels but when I do it is usually between 110-125 in the morning fasting, and 120-130 2 hrs after eating. Almost 5 months ago my Primary care Doc. put me on Crestor for high cholestoral. 1 month later he was not saticfied with the drop in cholestoral so he put me on a fairley new drug called Trilipix. I take 10mg of lisinopril for high blood pressure, 10 mg of crestor, and 145mg of trilipix. After being put on the trilipix I started felling tired and having stomache problems (constipated and cramping). I went back to have my a1c check last week and it was 8.0. I have seen a few post on different web sites with people being put on trilipix having trouble controling there blood sugar levels. I can't eat hardly anything without it raising my sugar levels. For instance I ate a bowl of cherrioes @ 8:30pm and my morning reading fasting was 143. Also 2 hours after dinner (light dinner very little carbs) and a softball game my reading was 178. This has never happened before. I have started a diet to get my levels under control and have been keeping them in the 100-135 fasting and 2 hours after meals. But thats eating very little, i.e grilled chicken or fish and green vegetables.I know diabetes is progressive but can it change like this so fast, or can the meds be doing a number on my diabetes. Has any one had problems with trilipix causing issues with blood sugar levels please help. Sorry about the misspelled stuff. Sorry, I d Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Early Insulin Treatment Equals Better Outcomes

Diabetes: Early Insulin Treatment Equals Better Outcomes

A recent Type 2 diabetes study found early insulin therapy to be as effective as 15 months of oral therapy, and it may improve the body's ability to produce insulin, according to a news release . Researchers from Ohio University and Western University of Health Sciences ' College of Osteopathic Medicine conducted a pilot study of 23 adults who were newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, and who were had early oral therapy. By the end of their study, the researchers saw significant improvements. The first step in Type 2 treatment is to have oral therapy, which suppresses glucose production by the liver. This is necessary because insulin, the hormone normally produced by the pancreas, is not produced in Type 2 patients, and is a vital part of the digestive system that allows the body to utilize glucose from carbohydrates in the food that you eat and it controls blood sugar levels. If diagnosed, patients can receive early insulin treatments, which may have less metabolic side effects. The pilot study was conducted in a series of successful cases which were completed at The Ohio University Diabetes Institute . In a controlled trial, the insulin-treated group's A1C levels decreased from 10.1 percent to 6.7 percent after 15 months, according to the researchers. TheA1Ctest is a common blood test used to diagnose Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and also to gauge how a patient is managing their diabetes. The group that received intensive oral therapy saw that their A1C levels dropped from 9.9 percent to 6.8 percent at 15 months. The researchers found that the intensive oral therapy group gained weight and the insulin-treated group lost an average of five pounds. "While the improvement in glucose was relatively comparable between the two groups, our findings support the idea that the Continue reading >>

A1c Test

A1c Test

Print Overview The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well you're managing your diabetes. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications. Why it's done An international committee of experts from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the International Diabetes Federation, recommend that the A1C test be the primary test used to diagnose prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. After a diabetes diagnosis, the A1C test is used to monitor your diabetes treatment plan. Since the A1C test measures your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months instead of your blood sugar level at a specific point in time, it is a better reflection of how well your diabetes treatment plan is working overall. Your doctor will likely use the A1C test when you're first diagnosed with diabetes. This also helps establish a baseline A1C level. The test may then need to be repeated while you're learning to control your blood sugar. Later, how often you need the A1C test depends on the type of diabetes you have, your treatment plan and how well you're managing your blood sugar. For example, the A1C test may be recommended: Once every year if you have prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes Twice a year if Continue reading >>

Hba1c And Diabetes – Glycated Hemoglobin (a1c) Explained

Hba1c And Diabetes – Glycated Hemoglobin (a1c) Explained

Diabetes and its complications remain a major cause of early disease and death worldwide. The diagnosis of diabetes is to a large extent based on detecting elevated levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a laboratory measure frequently used for this purpose. The test is also useful to monitor treatment in patients with established diabetes. Approximately 8 percent of the US populations suffer from type 2 diabetes, with as many as 40 percent of those undiagnosed (1). Worldwide, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is estimated at 6.4 percent in adults but varies somewhat among countries with the rate of undetected diabetes as high as 50 percent in some areas (2). The term diabetes describes several disorders of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism that are characterized by high levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia). Diabetes is associated with a relative or absolute impairment in insulin secretion, along with varying degrees of peripheral resistance to the action of insulin (3). The Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes The prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes continues to increase worldwide, with type 2 diabetes much more common and accounting for over 90 percent of patients with diabetes. Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile onset or insulin-dependent diabetes because it often presents in childhood and it is characterized by the inability of the pancreas to produce the insulin. Insulin is necessary for the cells of the body to be able to utilize glucose for energy production. Without insulin, glucose accumulates in the blood leading to hyperglycemia. Due to the absence of insulin, most patients with type 1 diabetes need to be treated with insulin. Conversely, type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset or non-insulin-depend Continue reading >>

My A1c Test Showed My Number At 6.7, Can I Improve My Number With Diet And Exercise? I Do Not Want To Take Medication

My A1c Test Showed My Number At 6.7, Can I Improve My Number With Diet And Exercise? I Do Not Want To Take Medication

Please visit the new WebMD Message Boards to find answers and get support. My A1C test showed my number at 6.7, can I improve my number with diet and exercise? I do not want to take medication For someone who doesn't have diabetes, a normal A1C level can range from 4.5 to 6 percent. Someone who's had uncontrolled diabetes for a long time might have an A1C level above 8 percent. When the A1C test is used to diagnose diabetes, an A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. For most people who have previously diagnosed diabetes, an A1C level of 7 percent or less is a common treatment target. Higher targets may be chosen in some individuals. If your A1C level is above your target, your doctor may recommend a change in your diabetes treatment plan. Remember, the higher your A1C level, the higher your risk of diabetes complications. If this dose not show blue, just copy into google to the www. To open and read. PS yes get exercising and look up what to eat to get back on track, try googling the diabetes diet, you should find all the help you need. Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD User-generated content areas like communities, reviews, ratings, blogs, or WebMD Answers are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products th Continue reading >>

B!g Data - What It Means For Our Health And The Future Of Medical Research - 2012 Summer - Stanford Medicine Magazine - Stanford University School Of Medicine

B!g Data - What It Means For Our Health And The Future Of Medical Research - 2012 Summer - Stanford Medicine Magazine - Stanford University School Of Medicine

What it means for our health and the future of medical research What it means for our health and the future of medical research I think Im getting sick, says Michael Snyder, PhD, cheerfully, unbuttoning his shirt cuff and rolling up his sleeve to show me the inside of his elbow. A ball of white cotton puffs out from under the white tape used to cover the site of a blood draw. Snyder, 57, a lean, intense-looking man who chairs Stanfords genetics department, doesnt sound at all upset about his impending illness. In fact, he sounds positively satisfied. Its a viral illness; one of the hazards of having young children, I guess, he says, smiling. So far Im only a little sniffly. But it does give me another sample. I sat in a chair in his small office, pondering the handshakes we had exchanged moments earlier and surreptitiously wiping my palm on my jeans. Blood samples are nothing new to any of us. Theyre a routine part of medical checkups and give vital information to clinicians about our cholesterol and blood sugar levels, the function of our immune systems, and our production of hormones and other metabolites. The fleeting pinch of discomfort is a small price to pay for such a peek inside our own bodies. But Snyders recently obtained blood sample was destined for a different fate. It was also what had brought me to his office on an unseasonably warm afternoon in February. While the standard blood test panel recommended during routine checkups assesses the presence and levels of only a few variables, such as the total numbers of red and white blood cells, hemoglobin and cholesterol levels, Snyders would undergo a much more intense analysis yielding millions of bits of data for an ultra-high-definition portrait of health and disease. The unprecedented study, termed an inte Continue reading >>

Onglyza(tm) (saxagliptin) Demonstrated Significant Improvements Across Key Measures Of Glucose Control When Added To A Sulfonylurea Or Thiazolidinedione In People With Inadequately Controlled Type 2 Diabetes

Onglyza(tm) (saxagliptin) Demonstrated Significant Improvements Across Key Measures Of Glucose Control When Added To A Sulfonylurea Or Thiazolidinedione In People With Inadequately Controlled Type 2 Diabetes

ONGLYZA(TM) (saxagliptin) Demonstrated Significant Improvements Across Key Measures of Glucose Control When Added to a Sulfonylurea or Thiazolidinedione in People With Inadequately Controlled Type 2 Diabetes ROME--( BUSINESS WIRE )--Results from two 24-week Phase III studies presented at the 44th European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting demonstrated that ONGLYZA (saxagliptin), an investigational selective inhibitor with extended binding to the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme in development by Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE: BMY) and AstraZeneca (NYSE: AZN), produced significant reductions across all key measures of glucose control studied [glycosylated hemoglobin level (A1C), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and postprandial glucose (PPG)] when added to a sulfonylurea (SU) or a thiazolidinedione (TZD) in people with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes, compared to placebo added to either an increased dose of SU or a stable dose of TZD. The addition of saxagliptin to SU or TZD was well tolerated over the course of the studies, and significantly more people were able to achieve target A1C of less than 7 percent versus the comparators. The companies submitted a New Drug Application to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) on June 30, which has been officially filed by the FDA, and a Marketing Authorization Application to the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) on July 1, which has been accepted for review by the Agency. The submissions are based on data from a comprehensive clinical trial program conducted in addition to standard therapies, as well as in treatment nave patients as a monotherapy. The clinical trial program included studies that evaluated the drug at up to 80 times the proposed usual clinical dose of 5 mg, once daily. The six Continue reading >>

Blog Archives - The Diabetic Cyclist

Blog Archives - The Diabetic Cyclist

With a brisk wind and the temperature at 50 this afternoon, going for a run didn't sound to appealing. I'm definitely a hot and humid weather athlete, sweating and suffering is more appealing to me than the cold and wind. As my blood sugar started to creep up slowly after work I became more interested in running, with rain forecast for the next two days, today would be my last chance to get in a decent run. The plan was to run five miles at a relaxed pace, I need to run a relaxed first seven miles of my half marathon this Sunday. This afternoon I wanted to run at a 9 minute pace, Sunday my goal is to be at mile seven at the one hour mark. As my run began this afternoon my blood sugar was at 150 and trending up, I felt great and had an extra confidence boost knowing my blood sugar would be ok. The first half of my run was horrible, I felt good but a very cold head wind for almost three miles was painful. As I made the turn the wind was at my back and I felt amazing. I was relaxed and enjoying every step. As I hit the four mile mark I peaked at my watch and noticed I was running for 33 minutes. I would finish my run in 40 minutes, I really pushed the last mile which was mostly uphill. I felt great and wanted to test myself, I have had a tough time finishing strong when it comes to races. I was happy to see my blood sugar at 104 when I returned home, I grabbed a small protein snack and took some insulin before preparing my dinner. I'm happy with how well everything went this afternoon, the race Sunday is at 8am so none of what I did with my diabetes today will be used race day but I do have a ton of confidence heading in to the race. As far as running goes, I feel great, I feel strong and I'm very confident that I will be able to stick to my running plan and hopefully PR Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Lower A1c For Patients With Type 1 Diabetes?

Can Metformin Lower A1c For Patients With Type 1 Diabetes?

Home / Conditions / Obesity / Can Metformin Lower A1c For Patients With Type 1 Diabetes? Can Metformin Lower A1c For Patients With Type 1 Diabetes? Insulin resistance has been proposed as one of the causes of poor glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes who have excess weight or obesity. To compare the effect of metformin vs. placebo on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), total daily dose (TDD) of insulin, and other parameters in youth with T1D who have excess weight or obesity they did a 9-mo randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of metformin and placebo in 28 subjects (13m/15) of ages 10-20 years (y), with HbA1c >8% (64 mmol/mol), BMI >85%, and T1D > 12 months and was conducted at a university outpatient facility. The metformin group consisted of 15 subjects (8 m/ 7f), of age 15.0 2.5 y; while the control group was made up of 13 subjects (5m/ 8f), of age 14.5 3.1y. All participants employed a self-directed treat-to-target insulin regimen based on a titration algorithm of (-2)-0-(+2) units to adjust their long-acting insulin dose every 3rd day from -3 mo through +9 mo to maintain fasting plasma glucose (FPG) between 90-120 mg/dL (5.0-6.7 mmol/L). Pubertal maturation was determined by Tanner stage. It was assumed that the metformin therapy will improve glycemic control in youth with T1D and excess weight or obesity, similar to those with type 2 diabetes. Youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who have excess weight or obesity often have suboptimal glycemic control. Though insulin resistance has been proposed as one of the causes of this poor glycemic control, the role of adjunctive metformin, an insulin sensitizer, on glycemic control in these patients is unclear. Metformin is a biguanide, which acts principally by increasing insulin sensitivity in the liver by inhib Continue reading >>

Hacking Diabetes

Hacking Diabetes

NOTE: The top part of this post is background and basics. If you are a diabetic who wants the advanced techniques, they are further down a bit. Being a Type 1 diabetic sucks. But, if you know anyone who is diabetic then you likely already know that. Over the last twenty years I've tried many different drugs, diets, techniques, and hacks all meant to keep me alive as long as possible. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, liver failure, kidney failure and a bunch of other stuff that also sucks. It would be really awesome to die of regular old age rather than some complication of diabetes. Every few months a diabetic should get a blood test call an hA1c that is a measure of long term blood sugar control. A normal person's A1C is between 4% and 6% which roughly corresponds to a 3 month average blood sugar of between 70 and 120mg/dl, which is great. My A1c has been around 6.0 to 6.7 which is under the American Diabetes Association's recommendation for Type 1 diabetics of 7.0, but not as low as I'd like it. Related Reading I recently redoubled my efforts and lost about 30lbs, started working out more and removed more carbohydrates by implementing a relaxed paleo diet. This, combined with some medical equipment changes that I discuss below have resulted in my latest A1c - just in last week - of 5.7%. That means for the first time in nearly 20 years I have maintained near-normal blood sugar for at least 3 months. Basics A Type 1 diabetic doesn't produce any insulin, and insulin is required to process sugar and deliver it to the cells. Without insulin, you'd die rather quickly. There's no diet, no amount of yoga, green tea or black, herbs or spices that will keep a Type 1 diabetic alive and healthy. Type 1 diabetes is NOT Type 2 diabetes, so I'm not interested in your jui Continue reading >>

Insulin Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes: Rescue, Augmentation, And Replacement Of Beta-cell Function

Insulin Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes: Rescue, Augmentation, And Replacement Of Beta-cell Function

Type 2 diabetes is characterized by progressive beta-cell failure. Indications for exogenous insulin therapy in patients with this condition include acute illness or surgery, pregnancy, glucose toxicity, contraindications to or failure to achieve goals with oral antidiabetic medications, and a need for flexible therapy. Augmentation therapy with basal insulin is useful if some beta-cell function remains. Replacement therapy with basal-bolus insulin is required for beta-cell exhaustion. Rescue therapy using replacement regimens for several weeks may reverse glucose toxicity. Replacement insulin therapy should mimic normal release patterns. Basal insulin, using long-acting insulins (i.e., neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], ultralente, glargine) is injected once or twice a day and continued on sick days. Bolus (or mealtime) insulin, using short-acting or rapid-acting insulins (i.e., regular, aspart, lispro) covers mealtime carbohydrates and corrects the current glucose level. The starting dose of 0.15 units per kg per day for augmentation or 0.5 units per kg per day for replacement can be increased several times as needed. About 50 to 60 percent of the total daily insulin requirement should be a basal type, and 40 to 50 percent should be a bolus type. The mealtime dose is the sum of the corrective dose plus the anticipated requirements for the meal and exercise. Adjustments should be made systematically, starting with the fasting, then the preprandial and, finally, the postprandial glucose levels. Basal therapy with glargine insulin provides similar to lower A1C levels with less hypoglycemia than NPH insulin. Insulin aspart and insulin lispro provide similar A1C levels and quality of life, but lower postprandial glucose levels than regular insulin. Twenty-seven percent of p Continue reading >>

Prevalence And Risk Factors Hemoglobin A1c, Serum Magnesium, Lipids, And Microalbuminuria For Diabetic Retinopathy: A Rural Hospital-based Study Phadnis P, Kamble Ma, Daigavane S, Tidke P, Gautam S - J Datta Meghe Inst Med Sci Univ

Prevalence And Risk Factors Hemoglobin A1c, Serum Magnesium, Lipids, And Microalbuminuria For Diabetic Retinopathy: A Rural Hospital-based Study Phadnis P, Kamble Ma, Daigavane S, Tidke P, Gautam S - J Datta Meghe Inst Med Sci Univ

Objective: To study the risk factors responsible for diabetic retinopathy (DR). Material and Methods: One hundred and six cases of DR were included for the study. Detailed history including age and sex of the patient, duration of diabetes, anterior segment, and detailed fundus examination was carried out. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), postmeal blood sugar (PMBS), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), serum magnesium, lipid profile, and microalbuminuria were performed. Results: Of 106 patients of DR, 69.81% were males and 30.18% females. Average duration of diabetes was 7.67 years. Average age was 57.16 years. Nonproliferative DR (NPDR) was present in 87.73% and proliferative DR (PDR) in 12.26%. Raised FBS was present in 78.30%, raised PMBS in 69.81%, raised HbA1c in 77.35%, hypomagnesemia in 22.64%, and microalbuminuria in 7.55% patients. Raised low-density lipoprotein was present in 32.11% NPDR, 3.67% PDR, 19.81% clinically significant macular edema (CSME). Raised triglycerides were present in 37.74% NPDR, 1.88% PDR, and 21.70% CSME. Raised total cholesterol was present in 28.30% NPDR, 1.88% PDR, and 18.87% CSME. Conclusion: Risk factors for developing DR were duration of diabetes, uncontrolled blood sugar, raised HbA1c, hypomagnesemia, presence of microalbuminuria, and raised serum lipids. Therefore, good glycemic control with early diagnosis and management is required to prevent DR. Keywords:Diabetic retinopathy, hypomagnesemia, microalbuminuria, serum lipids Phadnis P, Kamble MA, Daigavane S, Tidke P, Gautam S. Prevalence and risk factors Hemoglobin A1c, serum magnesium, lipids, and microalbuminuria for diabetic retinopathy: A rural Hospital-based study. J Datta Meghe Inst Med Sci Univ 2017;12:121-32 Phadnis P, Kamble MA, Daigavane S, Tidke P, Gautam S. Prevalence and risk factors Continue reading >>

Why Raise Your A1c?

Why Raise Your A1c?

Have you been ordered by your doctor to get your A1C (HbA1c) level up? More people are having this confusing experience, as doctors try to implement the 2013 ADA treatment guidelines. Do these orders make sense? Not much, I’d say. What is happening here? In 2012, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) changed the targets doctors should aim for in treating diabetes. They went from a one-size-fits-all target of 7.0% HbA1c to a three-tiered guideline. HbA1c is the test that gives an idea of the average blood glucose level for the previous two months or so. An A1C of 7.0% equals an average blood glucose of around 154 mg/dl, and many people think that number is too high to protect against complications. So there was pressure to lower the guideline. At the same time, many older people found the 7.0% goal too strict. A few studies found an increased risk of falls in older people who run low glucose levels. There was concern about increased risk of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). As Diane Fennell wrote here, many think that aiming for lower A1C levels leads to an increase in low blood glucose episodes. As many readers commented, hypos are dangerous and unpleasant. For many, they are the worst fact of life with diabetes. So the experts finally recognized that one size does not fit all. Unfortunately, their new guidelines have been misunderstood by some doctors, leading to people being told to raise their A1C numbers, even if doing so increases their complication risk. According to the new guidelines, older or sicker people, or those with many hypoglycemic episodes, might shoot for 7.5% to 8.0%. Younger, healthier, people might want to get their A1C below 6.5%, or even lower. People in between on age and health mi Continue reading >>

All Categories - Bootcamp For Betics

All Categories - Bootcamp For Betics

If your family is anything like mine, youll have ample opportunity to completely skyrocket your blood sugar levels tomorrow. When I was younger, heres what my Thanksgiving Day experience looked like: My family starts Thanksgiving day drinking mimosas and eating something luxurious like quiche with fruit while wearing our pajamas. Then, after breakfast, we munch on the pre-thanksgiving appetizers. Theres usually a cheese & cracker tray, a relish tray, cookies, at least three different kinds of chips, dip, salsa, pigs in a blanket, and, well, you know the drill. By the time Thanksgiving dinner is ready, Im usually too full to eat anything, but that doesnt stop me from eating a full plate of food or two, after which Im so exhausted and stuffed that I have to lay down and go to sleep. An hour or two later, I wake up and eat some pie. And ice cream. By this time, one of two things happens. Either my blood sugar goes extremely LOW because I took way too much insulin for all the food I ate, or, my blood sugar goes extremely HIGH because, even though I took the correct amount of insulin, the insulin just cant catch up with all the food Im eating. Now, over the last few years, Ive figured out how to protect my blood sugar from imminent annihilation by employing blood sugar stabilization techniques that Ive compiled into my new Thanksgiving Survival Guide. These techniques will work whether you take insulin or not. Photo credit: Continue reading >>

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