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6.2 A1c

Asknadia: Pre-diabetes And How The Glycemic Index Affects My A1c

Asknadia: Pre-diabetes And How The Glycemic Index Affects My A1c

Dear Nadia: I am currently on a “pre-diabetic” watch because of excessive thirst and urination. My current A1c is 5.7. My last fasting glucose at eight hours was 106; at 12 hours 93. After those readings I had a freshly squeezed carrot/apple juice ( two apples, two carrots) drink. An hour later my glucose was 77. I looked a little pale but was feeling OK. Do apples lower glucose even when combined with the sweet carrots? Thank you! Elena Dear Elena: There are several facets to your question. Let me start with your A1C results. Your fasting A1C of 5.7 and your fasting glucose of 106 puts you in the pre-diabetes range. The fasting glucose reading of 93 puts your A1C at 4.9 which boarder’s pre-diabetes. Adding anther layer to these numbers is the variance of plus or minus .5 percent accuracy in the test itself. Your 5.7 A1C test result plus the .5 difference (assuming the test is erring on the higher end of the spectrum) will put your A1C at 6.2. Meaning your average glucose level would be 131 mg/dL, bringing you closer to the 140 mg/dL diabetes diagnosis. The 5.7 and 6.2 A1C would alert your healthcare professional team to recommend a few lifestyle changes. Primarily your diet and exercise. Kudos for knowing your blood sugar level after eating. 77 mg/dL gives you an A1C of 4.3. Hypoglycemia for most people is 70 mg/dL. It goes without saying, everyone is different. Work with your physician to determine your hypoglycemia, low blood sugar range and diet. Apples and or carrots are not categorized as foods that lower your blood sugar. From the exactness of your readings, I can assume that you already have a blood glucose meter and test strips. You obviously are very aware of your numbers and are at a point where you are tracking the possible effects of food and your blo Continue reading >>

To Your Good Health: A1c Is Better Screening Test For Diabetes

To Your Good Health: A1c Is Better Screening Test For Diabetes

Q: My A1c test on blood sugar is always higher (prediabetes) than my fasting glucose test (normal) on the same visit to the doctor. Which result should I believe? My latest test at a doctor’s office showed that my A1c is 6.2 percent, and fasting glucose is 88 mg/dL. The A1c pretty much remained at 6.2 percent level, while the fasting glucose varied between 81 and 88 in the past two years. The test is drawing a blood sample after a 12-hour overnight fast. I am not taking any diabetes medication. Previously, my A1c results were 5.9 percent in August 2016 and 5.5 percent in December 2016. A: Both the A1c test and the glucose tests are blood tests for diabetes. The blood glucose test is a snapshot of an instant in time, while the A1c is a measure of the average value over the past two or three months or so. The A1c looks at the amount of sugar molecules on the large hemoglobin protein of the blood. In general, the A1c is a better screening test for diabetes than a fasting glucose test, because fasting blood sugar is normal for a long time (potentially years) before one shows overt diabetes. In early Type 2 diabetes, the only time the blood sugar gets above normal is after eating (the blood sugar is supposed to go up a bit after eating, but in the early stages of diabetes, it goes higher than it should). The most sensitive test for Type 2 diabetes is a glucose tolerance test, where a fixed amount of sugar is given, and the blood is tested after two hours. An elevated level at two hours is prediabetes or diabetes. However, the A1c, which is affected by both fasting blood glucose levels and those after eating, is nearly as sensitive, and is much easier to do. Both the glucose tolerance test and the A1c usually will diagnose prediabetes and diabetes before the fasting glucose Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that can lead to many complications. When managed properly, diabetes does not have to control your life or ruin your health. Getting tested, especially if you are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, is a proactive measure you can take for yourself and your future. In the early stages of diabetes, there are no symptoms. An early diagnosis helps you get treatment before complications occur. The A1C test is a blood test that checks for type 2 diabetes. It is also used to see how well you are managing your diabetes if you have already been diagnosed. The test provides information about a person’s average levels of blood sugar over a two- to three-month period. The number is reported in the form of a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher your average blood glucose levels are, and the higher your risk for either diabetes or related complications. A1C is one of the primary tests used for diabetes diagnosis and management. It can test for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but it can’t test for gestational diabetes. It can also be used to predict the likelihood that someone will get diabetes. The A1C test measures how much glucose, or sugar, is attached to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells. The more glucose attached, the higher the A1C. This test is groundbreaking, as it 1) doesn’t require fasting, 2) gives a picture of blood sugar levels over a period of days and weeks instead of at just one point in time like fasting sugars, and 3) can be done at any time of day. This makes it easier to administer and easier to make accurate diagnoses. According to the National Institutes of Health, a normal A1C is below 5.7 percent. If your score is between 5.7 and 6.4 percent, the diagnosis is prediabetes. Having prediabetes put Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that blood glucose screening for adults begin at age 45, or sooner if you are overweight and have additional risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. There are several blood tests for prediabetes. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test This test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the test measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. In general: An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal An A1C level between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates type 2 diabetes Certain conditions can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you are pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant). Fasting blood sugar test A blood sample is taken after you fast for at least eight hours or overnight. In general: A fasting blood sugar level below 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — 5.6 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) — is considered normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 7.0 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. This result is sometimes called impaired fasting glucose. A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L) or higher indicates type 2 diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test This test is usually used to diagnose diabetes only during pregnancy. A blood sample is taken after you fast for at least eight hours or overnight. Then you'll drink a sugary solution, and your blood sugar level will be measured again after two hours. In general: A blood sugar level less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmo Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

The hemoglobin A1c test tells you your average level of blood sugar over the past 2 to 3 months. It's also called HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, and glycohemoglobin. People who have diabetes need this test regularly to see if their levels are staying within range. It can tell if you need to adjust your diabetes medicines. The A1c test is also used to diagnose diabetes. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells. It gives blood its red color, and it’s job is to carry oxygen throughout your body. The sugar in your blood is called glucose. When glucose builds up in your blood, it binds to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. The A1c test measures how much glucose is bound. Red blood cells live for about 3 months, so the test shows the average level of glucose in your blood for the past 3 months. If your glucose levels have been high over recent weeks, your hemoglobin A1c test will be higher. For people without diabetes, the normal range for the hemoglobin A1c level is between 4% and 5.6%. Hemoglobin A1c levels between 5.7% and 6.4% mean you have a higher change of getting of diabetes. Levels of 6.5% or higher mean you have diabetes. The target A1c level for people with diabetes is usually less than 7%. The higher the hemoglobin A1c, the higher your risk of having complications related to diabetes. A combination of diet, exercise, and medication can bring your levels down. People with diabetes should have an A1c test every 3 months to make sure their blood sugar is in their target range. If your diabetes is under good control, you may be able to wait longer between the blood tests. But experts recommend checking at least two times a year. People with diseases affecting hemoglobin, such as anemia, may get misleading results with this test. Other things that can Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

Is An A1c Of 6.2 Bad?

Is An A1c Of 6.2 Bad?

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that blood glucose screening for adults begin at age 45, or sooner if you are overweight and have additional risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. This test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the test measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you’ll have with sugar attached. This test is usually used to diagnose diabetes only during pregnancy. A blood sample is taken after you fast for at least eight hours or overnight. Then you’ll drink a sugary solution, and your blood sugar level will be measured again after two hours. Children who have prediabetes should be tested annually for type 2 diabetes or more often if the child experiences a change in weight or develops signs or symptoms of diabetes, such as increased thirst, increased urination, fatigue or blurred vision. Healthy lifestyle choices can help you bring your blood sugar level back to normal, or at least keep it from rising toward the levels seen in type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Experts Share Ways To Lower Your A1c Levels

Diabetes Experts Share Ways To Lower Your A1c Levels

Diabetes management at home is an important way of controlling your blood sugar levels without the help of an expert. In that sense, you are in control of your diabetes on a daily basis. However, the American Diabetes Associations’ recommends that a person with diabetes should get their A1C tested by a doctor at least two times a year. The test will give you a picture of your journey with diabetes as a whole. Now, once you do get the numbers, what do you do with that information? If you are on the right track, you will continue doing whatever it is that has been working so far. you feel encouraged! However, if the numbers are not what you and your health care provider were expecting, it is imperative that you embark on the path to lowering them so you can avoid any diabetes related complications in the future. The task can be daunting and overwhelming. We have rounded up 37 experts to share tips and ways that will help you in lowering your A1C levels and keeping them that way. The wisdom they share with us today will help you take those little steps towards a healthier lifestyle. 1. Sharon Castillo In a recent study published by the University of Toronto, it was shown that cinnamon has properties which can reduce blood pressure, especially for those who have prediabetes or type 2-diabetes. Hypertension or high blood pressure is common among those who have prediabetes and type-2 diabetics. High blood glucose levels create oxidative radicals which can damage the arteries. I recommend reading the following articles: The damage to the arteries can result into the scarring of the blood vessels. The scarring builds up plaque which reduces the size of the blood vessel. The reduction in the size of the diameter increases blood pressure. While not all of cinnamon’s mechanism Continue reading >>

Diabetes Simplified: A1c Testing

Diabetes Simplified: A1c Testing

By Wil Dubois “Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who’s the best-controlled of all?” —what the Wicked Queen would have asked if she’d had diabetes instead of vanity issues If you’ve had diabetes for any time at all, you’ve probably heard of the A1C test. Sometimes, it’s also called the HbA1c test, the Hemoglobin A1c test, or the glycated hemoglobin test. They’re all the same thing. This is a lab test that allows your doctor, by consulting with a magic mirror, to determine how well your diabetes has been controlled, night and day, for the last three months. If that’s not black magic, I don’t know what is. Of course, as sci-fi writer Arthur C. Clarke famously said, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” The A1C has become the widely accepted benchmark for diabetes control. It’s used to classify who is in control and who is not, and to quantify the risk levels of those not in-target. The higher the A1C, the greater the risk of complications. The A1C is now also used diagnostically, with A1C scores actually used to diagnose new-onset diabetes. The A1C Test: How Does It Work? Well, like I said, it’s magic: in this case, the magic of biochemistry. The test measures the average blood sugar level for the past three months. It can do this because glucose sticks to red blood cells, just like powdered sugar sticks to freshly-fried doughnut holes. The result of the test is expressed as a percentage: 6.2 percent…7.8 percent…8.3 percent…9.6 percent…12.4 percent…and so on. Most A1C scores are only expressed in tenths of a percent, but some labs report twentieths, as well, so you might see an A1C of 6.79 percent or 8.32 percent. Wait a sec. A percentage of what, exactly? The percentage of hemoglobin in the sample of red Continue reading >>

The Normal A1c Level

The Normal A1c Level

Wow Richard, 70 lbs? I have lost 24 lbs from low carb diet due to SIBO. It also helped my AC1 go down three points from 6.2 and my cholesterol is lower, which surprised me. I can’t afford to lose anymore weight because I was small to begin with. I had noticed much bigger people in the UK over the last 5 years compared to 15-20. Was quite shocking. I thought we had the patent on obesity! I am not diabetic that I know of but I had weird symptoms… Thirst that continued all day and night. My husband called me a camel. Dry eyes, rashes, strange dark discolouration on arm, under the arm to the side, some circulation issues and blurred vision. Eye specialist could not figure out why. Sores in the mouth also. I had observed about three weeks into super low carbs (30 Gms carb/day) that athlete’s foot symptom, sores in mouth and rashes were clearing up. So, lowering carbs for SIBO actually turned out for the best. By the way, I love your final paragraph. Research is what led me to SIBO diagnosis, and I then told the GI what to look for! He was barking up the wrong tree for months. Said I needed to eat more carbs so I don’t lose weight. Well, carbs fed the bacterial overgrowth!!! Dang fool. On Saturday, June 23, 2012, Diabetes Developments wrote: There is a new comment on the post “The Normal A1C Level”. Author: Richard Comment: I think part of the problem is that doctors are trained over many years to treat with pills, not with food. We continue to do what we are trained to do no matter what. I do believe they want to help us but don’t have the nutritional knowledge because that is not their expertise. When you have a hammer, etc. Nutritionist are no better unless they are those involved in research. They just peddle the messages they are told to. Then again, why wo Continue reading >>

The Normal A1c Level

The Normal A1c Level

You want to control your diabetes as much as possible. You wouldn’t be reading this if you didn’t. So you regularly check your A1C level. This is the best measurement of our blood glucose control that we have now. It tells us what percentage of our hemoglobin – the protein in our red blood cells that carry oxygen – has glucose sticking to it. The less glucose that remains in our bloodstream rather than going to work in the cells that need it the better we feel now and the better our health will continue to be. Less glucose in the bloodstream over time leads to lower A1C values. As we are able to control our diabetes better and better, the reasonable goal is to bring our A1C levels down to normal – the A1C level that people who don’t have diabetes have. But before we can even set that goal, we have to know what the target is. The trouble with setting that target is that different experts tell us that quite different A1C levels are “normal.” They tell us that different levels are normal – but I have never heard of actual studies of normal A1C levels among people without diabetes – until now. The major laboratories that test our levels often say that the normal range is 4.0 to 6.0. They base that range on an old standard chemistry text, Tietz Fundamentals of Clinical Chemistry. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial or DCCT, one of the two largest and most important studies of people with diabetes, said that 6.0 was a normal level. But the other key study, the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study or UKPDS, which compared conventional and intensive therapy in more than 5,000 newly diagnosed people with type 2 diabetes, said that 6.2 is the normal level. Those levels, while unsubstantiated, are close. But then comes along one of my heroes, Dr. Continue reading >>

Patient Comments: Hemoglobin A1c Test - High Results

Patient Comments: Hemoglobin A1c Test - High Results

I have been doing a lot of research on CIN1. I was 26 when my doctor told me I have cervical dysplasia (CIN1), January of 20017. I didn't think anything of it. But then she told me I have HPV high risk E6/E7 mRNA. One day I was looking through my medical records online and discovered I had CIN1 3 years ago July of 2014 and my doctor never told me. Now I am stressing over it because my periods are irregular and when I do have them they are strange. Also the year of 2014 I told my doctor I was having clots the size of 2 half dollars put together and she didn't say anything either. I get pelvic pain sometimes. She did a biopsy and I was positive for CIN1 and high risk HPV and ascus. I don't know what I should do, maybe I should get a new doctor. In May 2015 I was really tired, lethargic and bloated all the time. I was so constipated and miserable. I had been gluten free for 4 years by self-diagnosis. Finally, I went to a gastroenterologist. My blood work came back positive for Helicobacter pylori. The doctor said that H. pylori causes similar symptoms as gluten allergies. I had an endoscopy and colonoscopy which showed all of the internal inflammation and prior damage from the bacteria. It seemed to be dormant so there was no need for eradication, however the prescription acid reflux pills made me sick so I stopped that. Now I take probiotics and manuka honey and feel great. Try to avoid the prescription drugs. I have to go back for a check up to see if the bacteria is gone. I just had a laparoscopy 2 days ago and other than feeling full and bloated from the gas and a soreness around the incisions, I feel pretty good. The day of the surgery when I came home, I was very sleepy and slept for almost 2 days with getting up, except here and there to use the bathroom and eat. My Continue reading >>

A1c Is Better Screening Test For Diabetes

A1c Is Better Screening Test For Diabetes

Dear Dr. Roach • My A1c test on blood sugar is always higher (prediabetes) than my fasting glucose test (normal) on the same visit to the doctor. Which result should I believe? My latest test at a doctor’s office showed that my A1c is 6.2 percent, and fasting glucose is 88 mg/dL. The A1c pretty much remained at 6.2 percent level, while the fasting glucose varied between 81 and 88 in the past two years. The test is drawing a blood sample after a 12-hour overnight fast. I am not taking any diabetes medication. Previously, my A1c results were 5.9 percent in August 2016 and 5.5 percent in December 2016. — K.H. Answer • Both the A1c test and the glucose tests are blood tests for diabetes. The blood glucose test is a snapshot of an instant in time, while the A1c is a measure of the average value over the past two or three months or so. The A1c looks at the amount of sugar molecules on the large hemoglobin protein of the blood. In general, the A1c is a better screening test for diabetes than a fasting glucose test, because fasting blood sugar is normal for a long time (potentially years) before one shows overt diabetes. In early Type 2 diabetes, the only time the blood sugar gets above normal is after eating (the blood sugar is supposed to go up a bit after eating, but in the early stages of diabetes, it goes higher than it should). The most sensitive test for Type 2 diabetes is a glucose tolerance test, where a fixed amount of sugar is given, and the blood is tested after two hours. An elevated level at two hours is prediabetes or diabetes. However, the A1c, which is affected by both fasting blood glucose levels and those after eating, is nearly as sensitive, and is much easier to do. Both the glucose tolerance test and the A1c usually will diagnose prediabetes and di Continue reading >>

Translating A1c To A Blood Sugar Level

Translating A1c To A Blood Sugar Level

In the USA, doctors recommend that you have your Hemoglobin A1c measured at least twice per year. This simple blood test will tell you an approximation of your blood sugar control for the past 3 months based on the amount of Advanced Glycogenated End-Products (AGEs) that have accumulated in your blood. The higher your blood sugar levels are, the more AGEs are present. AGEs are also responsible for the development of complications such as retinopathy and neuropathy, because that accumulation will build and irritate crucial nerve-endings. Now, let’s get back to your A1C: To help people with diabetes understanding their A1C in real day-to-day terms, the medical world has developed the “eAG” measurement. Estimated Average Glucose. Your eAG will give your A1C reading in a blood sugar level of milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) just like you’re used to seeing on your glucose meter. The American Diabetes Association has this easy calculator, allowing you to enter and translate your latest A1C to your eAG. 12% = 298 mg/dL (240 – 347) 11% = 269 mg/dL (217 – 314) 10% = 240 mg/dL (193 – 282) 9% = 212 mg/dL (170 –249) 8% = 183 mg/dL (147 – 217) 7% = 154 mg/dL (123 – 185) 6% = 126 mg/dL (100 – 152) What can you do with that information? It is recommended that people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes achieve an A1C of 7.0 percent or lower for optimal health, and the prevention of complications. This translates to an average blood sugar before and between meals around 70 to 130 mg/dL. And after meals, under 180 mg/dL. For pregnancy with diabetes, an A1C lower than 6.5 percent is imperative for the healthy development of your baby, and your own health and safety. Post-meal blood sugars for pregnant women is suggested at lower than 120 mg/dL. A non-diabetic’s A1C is Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes With A1c Level Of 6.2%

Gestational Diabetes With A1c Level Of 6.2%

Gestational Diabetes with A1C Level of 6.2% I am 32 yrs old and 32 weeks pregnant, on 28th weeks of pregnany doctor took oral glucose tolerence test (50gm of glucose after 1 hr)it was 6.2 mmol/l this week (32). Again the doctor took the fasting Blood glucose,pp and hba1c test and the test result is BGF is 3.5mmol/l ,PP is 4.9,mmol/land A1c is 6.2% Is it normal or i am in risk of gestational diabetes? I am worried about it because HbA1c is 6.2%? First of all, I want to tranquilize you and say to keep calm. Nothing good comes from being stressed. On contrary, you will increase chances to become ill. Now, coming to your concern. From what you are saying, I do not think you have gestational diabetes . The control of blood sugar your doctor asked and performed to you is to assure whether you are or/and have the chances to a diabetic or not. It is like a routine test set while following-up a pregnant woman during her pregnancy. According to the ADA recommendations for 2011, if you had the following results - 92 mg/dL (5.1 mmol/L) at baseline; or 180 mg/dL (9.9 mmol/L) after 1 hour; or 153 mg/dL (8.4 mmol/L) after 2 hours; then, we can say that you are a diabetic. As you may see yourself, your blood sugar readings are far away from that of a diabetic; therefore, you should not be worried about that. Just try to relax and think that you are going to have your baby in your arms very soon:) With regards to your A1C level , I could say that you should not worried about that too. This is because an A1C level of 0.2 points more than the normal level is not something to be worried out. Usually, such little points we do not count. However, such oscillations of blood sugar during the last 3 months is explained with your increased needs for nutrients and energy for the baby-in-come. So Continue reading >>

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