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504 Plans: A Guide For Parents

504 Plans: A Guide For Parents

In a perfect world, students with diabetes would attend school without worrying whether someone in the building knows how to inject glucagon in a low blood sugar emergency. They wouldn't be left behind on field trips because the nurse took a vacation day or be told they couldn't try out for the football team because it's too risky. While many children get through school without an issue, too many run into obstacles simply because of their diabetes. The good news: The law is on the students' side. By setting up a 504 plan, parents can make sure the school takes responsibility not only for their children's education but their care, too. Read on for the 411 on 504 plans. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on disability. A 504 plan, then, is a legal document designed to ensure that students with a disability such as diabetes can manage their condition at school and receive the same education as other kids. The plan, which applies to all public schools and any private schools that receive federal funds, uses diabetes management goals developed by a student's health care provider to spell out for the school exactly how the child's diabetes should be managed during the day. All children with diabetes should qualify for services under Section 504, although individual assessment is required. And, according to Crystal Jackson, director of the American Diabetes Association's Safe at School campaign, all qualifying students with diabetes should have a 504 plan in place. Consider a 504 plan like insurancesomething you have for peace of mind, in case of a natural disaster or car accident. It's a good idea to set up a 504 plan as soon as your child is diagnosed with diabetes, even if all is well with the school. "Be Continue reading >>

504 Plans For Type 1 Diabetics

504 Plans For Type 1 Diabetics

Creating a purposeful 504 Plan to adapt with your T1D's needs A 504 Plan for your Type 1 Diabetic will be a vital tool for your student. It's important to have a 504 Plan BEFOREyou need a 504 Plan! The Type 1 Diabetes 504 Plan will be different than most 504 Plans implemented at a school. The best 504 Plan should be personalized for the specific needs of each child. A Type 1 Diabetic's 504 Plan should also adapt and change. A student's age and grade level may impact self-management. Methods of management and equipment may also change mid-year. And most importantly, Extracurricular Activities and Standardized Testing requirements should be added to create a purposeful plan. 504 Plans for Type 1 Diabeticssimplified The 504 Plan for a Type 1 Diabetic is animportant tool for students. The term 504 Plan comes from the legal disability right offered by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. There are manylegal rights that protect Type 1 Diabetic students. 504 accommodations can also be requested through college. However, 504 rights and accommodations at the post-secondary level require self-advocacy. A good 504 Plan takes planning to accommodate the individualizedneeds for a Type 1 Diabetic student. The school's 504 Coordinator will implement the plan butparents should take on the responsibility of managing the plan. Managing the plan means updating it as needed. A good plan adapts with a child or teen through transition years. Parents can also coach teens in understanding the 504 process to self-advocate in college for their legal rights. You need a 504 Plan BEFORE you need a 504 Plan! All Type 1 Diabetic students in public school should implement a 504 Plan. The 504 should also include the details of the Diabetes Medical Management Plan. Standard T1D Accommodations will be differ Continue reading >>

People In The Know: Accommodations For Sats/acts

People In The Know: Accommodations For Sats/acts

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney People in the Know: Accommodations for SATs/ACTs Q: Our daughter will be taking college entrance exams this year. How can we make sure type 1 diabetes wont hinder her performance? A: Every year, thousands of students with diabetes take the SAT, PSAT/NMSQT, ACT, and AP exams right alongside their peers. The College Board and other testing agencies have fairly straightforward rules in place about how to request modifications related to diabetes management (you can find info for the SATs here and for the ACTs here ). However, because the process of obtaining modifications can take several months, its advisable to check requirements and deadlines for each type of test your child plans to take and make requests for modifications as far in advance of your childs testing date as possible. If your daughter is interested in taking the PSAT in the fall of her junior year, for example, you should start the accommodations request process in the spring of sophomore year. What kind of testing modifications should you request? As discussed in the American Diabetes Associations guide, Going to College with Diabetes: A Self-Advocacy Guide for Students , students with diabetes generally receive two types of modifications: permission to have diabetes care supplies with them in the testing area and modifications to the testing schedule. Be aware that testing agencies have very strict requirements on what may be brought into the testing room. With this in mind, you will want to make sure your child has authorization for the following: Access to blood glucose testing supplies, Access to snacks and drinks to treat hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, and Access to the childs insulin pump and/or continuous glucose monitoring system. Testing agencies also ha Continue reading >>

Section 504 - Accommodations For College Students By Dr. Mike Brown - Wrightslaw

Section 504 - Accommodations For College Students By Dr. Mike Brown - Wrightslaw

Although college students with disabilities are protected from discrimination under Section 504, some professors take a dim view of students who request accommodations. College-bound students need to learn self-advocacy skills - how to present information about their disability and accommodations so professors want to help. When college students master self-advocacy skills, they are more likely to make a successful transition from high school to college. After High School: An Overview for Students - A Q&A on topics related to the law for students who are entering college. College Students and Disability Law - Today, more students with documented disabilities are in higher education than ever before. Although the process has been slow, colleges and universities have made their programs more and more accessible, sometimes in good faith, sometimes due to coercion by federal agencies and courts. Students with Disabilities Preparing for Post secondary Education: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities (U. S. Department of Education). Booklet for students who plan to continue their education after high school; includes questions and answers about admissions, accommodations & academic adjustments, documentation, evaluations, and discrimination under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. In html ADA Q & A: Section 504 & Post secondary Education - Many parents of students with disabilities are familiar with rights and responsibilities under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) . As students and their families prepare for the transition from high school to post secondary education they often find they are less familiar with the protections provided by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act . These frequently asked que Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management At School | Ridgeland, Ms

Diabetes Management At School | Ridgeland, Ms

School personnel including teachers, aides, coaches, school (or district) nurse, bus drivers, principals and counselors The child or teens health care team (doctor, endocrinologist, etc.) It is important to note that it is the parent or guardians responsibility to notify school personnel that their child or teen has diabetes, provide the school with a copy of the doctors orders and supply the necessary diabetes supplies (meter, strips, snacks for low blood sugar, a kit for high blood sugar and a glucagon emergency kit, etc.). It is also important that school personnel understand that snacks and BG testing and treatment are part of the child or teens medical care they are not an option. Schools that adopt a caring attitude, allow the student to test and treat BG in the classroom as needed and provide a supportive environment have the best success with students who have diabetes. Testing blood glucose is one of the most important facets of diabetes management. Regular BG checks, up to several per day, may be ordered by the child or teens diabetes health care team before and after eating snacks and meals or before PE or other physical activity. Students should also be tested if they feel their BG is low or high, or if they display symptoms of high or low blood glucose. In some children and teens, symptoms may be hard to detect: the parent may be able to describe how their child acts when their blood glucose is low or high to give the school diabetes team a better clue as to what a childs personal reaction to highs and lows look like. In-class testing is preferred this prevents lost educational time due to walking down to the office, testing and walking back. Those minutes add up! Testing in class also allows for other students to learn about diabetes management and act as Continue reading >>

College Scholarships For Students With Disabilities

College Scholarships For Students With Disabilities

College Scholarships for Students With Disabilities College Scholarships for Students With Disabilities Students with disabilities often find the transition from high school to college a bit challenging. Unlike secondary school, where accommodations may have been easily accessible, college students must take the initiative to ask for assistance and locate resources. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act , students have many protections, so they should take the time to familiarize themselves with these rights to ensure they receive the help that they need to succeed. One resource some disabled students often neglect to pursue is financial aid . Although they are eligible for merit-based and need-based aid, both federal and institutional, they may also be eligible for many private sources of scholarship aid. Here are just a few examples of scholarships that are currently open to students with learning or physical disabilities. High school seniors with Type 1 diabetes have access to 12 scholarship programs provided by the Diabetes Scholars Foundation. The value of each award varies ($1,000 to $5,000), but students only need to complete one application to be considered for all awards. Deadline: May 15. Disabled students, who are seeking formal training in a particular vocation, academic, athletic or artistic field, may be eligible for this award. The Italian Catholic Federation offers several scholarships, ranging between $200 and $500 each. Students do not have to be Catholic or Italian to apply. Deadline: Rolling.Students with disabilities should also check with organizations related to their specific learning or physical condition, as many offer grants and scholarships to those pursuing a post-secondary education; loca Continue reading >>

Section 504 Plan: American Diabetes Association

Section 504 Plan: American Diabetes Association

The term "504 Plan" refers to a plan developed to meet the requirements of a federal law that prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (commonly referred to as "Section 504"). A 504 Plan sets out the actions the school will take to make sure the student with diabetes is medically safe, has the same access to education as other children, and is treated fairly. It is a tool that can be used to make sure that students, parents/guardians, and school staff understand their responsibilities and to minimize misunderstandings. Take a look at our sample 504 Plan available below. It lists a broad range of services and modifications that are often needed by students with diabetes, ranging from kindergarteners to high school seniors. All plans should specify that school staff must be trained to recognize hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia and to respond in accordance with the child's Diabetes Medical Management Plan. However, each plan should be individualized to the specific needs, abilities, and medical condition of the individual student. It is important to only include provisions that are relevant to the specific child. For example, a section on self-management probably would not be included in a kindergartener's plan. But the ability to bring in a blood glucose meter during an exam is critical for a high school student. Some school districts prefer to use their own 504 Plan form. This is perfectly fine as long as it contains language to appropriately meet all of the student's diabetes care needs at school. The content is what matters. Multiple staff members are trained to check blood glucose levels and administer insulin and glucagon. All school staffincluding teachers, coaches and bus driverswho interact regularly w Continue reading >>

504 Plans In Missouri

504 Plans In Missouri

Watch short & fun videos Start Your Free Trial Today Missouri schools must make 504 plans available to qualified students who have disabilities. Learn about what these plans include, how they are developed, and where to find resources that may help educators who implement them. What Are 504 Plans for Missouri Students? In Missouri, 504 plans exist to ensure that students who have disabilities receive the accommodations necessary to have fair and equal access to educational services. These 504 plans are required in Missouri, and across the country, under Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973. They typically are created for students who have disabilities that affect their ability to fully access classroom instruction or school activities, but are not in special education programs. Any school that receives funding from the federal government must comply with this legislation. For background information and a quick overview of 504 plans and federal regulations, check out this short lesson: What are Section 504 Regulations and Accommodations in Public Schools? Missouri students who are enrolled in a school that receives federal funding are entitled to accommodations under a 504 plan if they have a disability - either physical or psychological - that inhibits a critical life activity or if they have been treated as having a disability within the school system. Disabilities that qualify students for 504 plans include: Short-term injuries or illnesses that impact life activities Educators in Missouri should note that parents of students enrolled in a school that receives federal funding are also covered under Section 504. Therefore, schools must provide accommodations to parents with disabilities to ensure they have access to events and activities at their chil Continue reading >>

Advocacy | College Diabetes Network

Advocacy | College Diabetes Network

Check out the following resources to for even more information and support: 5 Calls is an open source app that lets you select an issue that you care about, then will give you the number of your representative and a sample script to make a call in less than 5 minutes. Comes highly recommend by CDN Staff and partners! The Advocacy Guide is a comprehensive explanation of what rights you are entitled to on campus and how to register for those rights. It also touches on your rights in the workplace. Feel free to read the entire guide, or check out highlights below. The Diabetes Hands Foundation offers this comprehensive pdf to help advocates identify their target issues and a plan to influence decision makers. This fantastic app from Diabetes Patient Advocacy Coalition allows you to contact your representatives about issues affecting people living with diabetes at the touch of a button. A must have! This video via Access Better Coverage and the Diabetes Hands Foundation is a great primer for the confusing world of health insurance. Continue reading >>

People In The Know: T1d At College

People In The Know: T1d At College

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney Q: Our daughter has started receiving college acceptance letters; should diabetes factor into her choice of school at all? What rights do students with diabetes have at college? A: The transition from high school to college is almost always a big one, for both students and parents. As you consider which college or university is the best fit for your child with type 1 diabetes, it can be helpful to understand how her educational rights will change in this new setting. Two important federal laws that you may already be familiar with at this point in your childs educational life the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) also serve to protect most college students with type 1 diabetes. The ADA applies to all state-run and private colleges, except those operated by religious institutions. Section 504 applies to all colleges that receive federal funds, including those that are religiously affiliated. Only a very few colleges are not subject to either the ADA or Section 504 protections. Another federal law your child with diabetes may have received services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) does not apply to postsecondary education. Under applicable law, college students with diabetes have the right to appropriate modifications related to their condition, such as being able to check blood sugar levels or eat or drink as needed during exams, reschedule exams without penalty if blood sugar is out of target range, and have kitchen and/or food access if the child lives in dorm housing provided by the college. The process for putting these kinds of modifications in place, however, may be vastly different from how you and your childs school worked tog Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes Accommodations For Exams

Understanding Diabetes Accommodations For Exams

Understanding Diabetes Accommodations for Exams The years leading up to college include taking major exams, which influence students' college choices. Of course, this can lead to stress and blood glucose fluctuations.Therefore, when preparing for college board exams, families of students with diabetes need to take steps to obtain exam accommodations. Here is some information on how to do so. SAT, SAT Subject Tests, PSAT/NMSQT, or AP Exams A request for accommodations must be sent and approved by Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD). In general, students approved by SSD for College Board testing accommodations meet the following criteria: 1. A Documented Disability. A letter from the physician treating the student with diabetes outlining that they treat the individual, when they were diagnosed and when the last office visit took place can be included. 2. Participation in a College Board Exam Is Impacted. The letter should also include a brief description of the individuals treatment regimen and that stress can cause fluctuations in blood glucose levels, leading to Only One Request Needed. Once approved by the College Board, accommodations can be used on all of these exams: 3. Requested Accommodation Is Needed. The most common requests with diabetes: Stop the clock testing to allow the individual to treat any flucutations in blood glucose (this requires a separate proctor, meaning the individual will be in a separate room than everyone else). This is not a required accommodation. I do have several patients who only request that they are allowed to bring their diabetes supplies into the exam with them. Allowing all diabetes supplies (including food to treat hypoglycemia) to be available during the exam. 4. Accommodation Is Received on School Tests. With few excep Continue reading >>

College Concerns For People With Diabetes: American Diabetes Association

College Concerns For People With Diabetes: American Diabetes Association

All students with diabetes have the right to be treated fairly, no matter their age. However, it is important to understand the differences between legal protections for students in K-12 education and post-secondary students. A few important differences include: In K-12 education, it is primarily the parent's responsibility to advocate for the needs of their child. In contrast, college is the time when students must take over this responsibility for themselves. K-12 public schools have an affirmative obligation to provide students with a "free appropriate public education" or FAPE. Colleges have no such obligation to provide an education to any particular person. However, they must not discriminate against otherwise qualified students. K-12 public schools also must identify children with disabilities. In contrast, it is the student's job to disclose their disability and request accommodations if needed. Finally, while many high schools create an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Section 504 Plan for students with diabetes, colleges typically do not. While colleges should provide written documentation of any modifications agreed to, this documentation typically will not be called a "Section 504 Plan." Below are resources to help ensure that post-secondary studentsincluding community college students, liberal arts college students, and graduate and professional school studentswith diabetes understand their rights and are treated fairly: Going to College with Diabetes: A Self Advocacy Guide for Students . This guide includes chapters on admissions, working with your disability services office, tips for internships and jobs, resolving disagreements, and standardized exams. It also includes helpful sample accommodations request forms. Know Your Rights for College St Continue reading >>

Tips For Parents Of College-bound Students

Tips For Parents Of College-bound Students

Tips for Parents of College-Bound Students Parents of students headed off to college have to navigate the waters of separation. That job only intensifies when their children have diabetes. Mary Burke-Roth, RN, an oncology nurse, knows this all too wellshe went through it when she moved her daughter, Christina Roth, to the University of MassachusettsAmherst six years ago. "It was difficult," Burke-Roth recalls. "I'm a nurse and it was still difficult. Luckily, she was very independent so she kind of helped prepare me." Getting a young adult with diabetes ready for college is a process for both parents and students. Here are some tips to make that move easier. It's important to talk before students leave the nest about issues that might arise at school. Christina Roth, who is now CEO and founder of the College Diabetes Network, a nonprofit organization supporting college students with diabetes and their parents, says laying the groundwork ahead of time can make taking the step toward college easier. "Start fostering independence," she says. Encourage your young adult child to talk about unfamiliar situations he or she may face, such as new schedules, foods, exposure to alcohol, and late nights. Besides carrying glucose to treat lows, students need to check blood glucose frequently to see how they react to such changes. Most college students are 18 or olderso they're legally adults and must make legal decisions about their health themselves, unless they sign forms saying their parents can still be involved in their health care decisions. But that doesn't mean they have to manage health without support. Crystal Jackson, director of the American Diabetes Association's Safe at School program (and mother of a recent college grad with diabetes), says it's important for student Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Sample 504 And Iep Plans

Children With Diabetes - Sample 504 And Iep Plans

Review of The Laws: Section 504 and the IDEA Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 According to this law, parents of qualifying children have the right to develop a Section 504 plan with their child's school. To qualify for protection under Section 504, a child must have a record of such impairment, or be regarded as having such impairment. Schools can lose federal funding if they do not comply with this law. Parents can use these laws to ensure that, while at school, their children with diabetes can fully participate in all school activities, while at the same time caring for their medical needs. This means that the school cannot refuse to allow a child to be on the honor roll, deny credit to a student whose absenteeism is related to diabetes, refuse to administer medication (a school cannot require parents to waive liability as a condition of giving medicine), and determine sports/extracurricular participation without regard to the student's diabetes. Any school that receives Federal funding must comply with IDEA and Section 504 laws. A child need not require special education to be protected. This law prohibits all schools and day care centers, except those run by religious organizations, from discriminating against children with disabilities, including diabetes. Protection under is this law is the same as that for Section 504. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) IDEA mandates the federal government to provides funding to education agencies, state and local, to provide free and appropriate education to qualifying students with disabilities. This includes children who have diabetes. As with the other two laws you must show that diabetes can, at times, adversely affect educational performance. The school is then required to develop an Individual Continue reading >>

College Advice For Students With A 504 Plan

College Advice For Students With A 504 Plan

College Advice For Students With A 504 Plan College Advice For Students With A 504 Plan Find out how to get your 504 plan accommodations in college. A 504 plan comes from Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which outlaws excluding people with disabilities from the opportunity to participate equally in federally funded activities, including college. Section 504 seeks to equalize opportunities for students with a disability, who may be otherwise inhibited from performing at the same level as fellow students. The term disability refers to a physical or mental impairment that may hinder a persons ability to perform major life activities. A 504 plan differs from an individualized educational program (IEP), in that only certain types of disabilities qualify for an IEP, but many that require assistance (and dont qualify for an IEP) are eligible for a 504 plan. A 504 can include physical hindrances, such as injuries, diseases, allergies or asthma. It can also include blood sugar monitoring for diabetics or even a gluten-free lunch option. A 504 can also apply to learning problems, such as ADD, and include educational aids such as a note taker. Remember, a student with a 504 plan is not in special education, the aim of a 504 is to empower a student to perform at the same level as his or her peers. A 504 plan covers students through high school, but the requirements of post-secondary institutions are different. If you are planning on applying for a 504 plan in college, you will have more responsibility than in high school. Your parents may not be very involved in the process, and you will need to be prepared to advocate for your own needs. While a high school is required to identify your requirements and provide free appropriate p Continue reading >>

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