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5 Stages Of Diabetes

Good Grief: Five Stages Mom-style

Good Grief: Five Stages Mom-style

The doctor said, You will grieve the life you thought he would have. Grief, I thought. Huh? My child had been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, but he was very much alive and sitting right next to me. Were we grieving a malfunctioning internal organ? I stared blankly at my sons new pediatric endocrinologist and thought to myself, Thank you, but I wont be grieving. His little eyes are watching me for how to respond. Bypassing denial, anger, bargaining and depression, I jumped straight to acceptance. And while I was standing strong during the immediate crisis, I was nave to the upcoming loss of normalcy and the permanent state of hyper-vigilance about to swallow our lives. Many Type 1 warriors (and their parents, counselors and doctors) have written about how Elisabeth Kubler-Ross five stages of grief present after a T1D diagnosis. The typical stages, however, didnt resonate with me. I wasnt mad. I didnt try bargaining. And I dont have time to find out if Im depressed. My stages included guilt, obsession, and helplessness, and they were on a loop with rejection and acceptance. Some days I visited all five. Other days just one seduced me, and wed hang out for months. No thank you to the minimum daily prescription of four injections and five bleeding fingers for my child. Unacceptable. Lethal doses of a life-saving medicine in a school backpack? Nope. I am not in denial of the diagnosis, but I do officially reject what it represents. We are living in the 21st century. Certainly a mainstream or alternative treatment exists to make this go away? Googling the cure now. Diet. Nope. Exercise. Nope. Transplant. Nope. Cinnamon. Nope. Okra. Nope. Supplements. Nope. Prayer. Nope. Type 1 diabetes is forever. You have it, and I dont. Im so sorry, my love, for all the ways I did this to Continue reading >>

Stages Of T1d

Stages Of T1d

Type 1 diabetes can now be most accurately understood as a disease that progresses in three distinct stages. TrialNet screening looks for five diabetes-related autoantibodies that signal an increased risk of T1D. The JDRF, ADA and Endocrine Society now classify having two or more of these autoantibodies as early stage T1D. Finding T1D in its earliest stage allows for prompt intervention aiming to change the course of the disease. T1D starts with a genetic predisposition—gene(s) that put you at higher risk. Risk for people in the general population is about 1 in 300. If you have a family member with T1D, your risk is 1 in 20. There are three distinct stages of T1D. The first two stages can be identified by TrialNet screening prior to symptoms. Our goal is to identify the disease in its earliest stage and stop disease progression by preserving beta cell production. Stages of T1D Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes?

Question: What is the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes? Answer: There are several types of diabetes; I'm going to discuss the two main types: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 formerly called juvenile onset diabetes occurs typically before the age of 20. Individuals with type 1 diabetes are usually thin, and the cause of type 1 diabetes is that the pancreas, the organ that secretes insulin, is destroyed by autoantibodies, that's why people with type 1 diabetes always need insulin, either injected or through an insulin pump. Type 1 diabetes occurs in about 10-15 percent of all the diabetics in the country. Now, the most common type of diabetes is what we call type 2, formerly called adult onset. Type 2 diabetics are usually heavy, usually diagnosed after the age of 35. Now, the cause of type 2 diabetes is quite different from type 1. The cause of type 2 diabete is primarily a complicated medical condition called 'insulin resistance.' In fact, in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, there's plenty of insulin around, it just doesn't work well. To treat type 2 diabetes, we typically use lifestyle, and that may work alone -- just diet and exercise -- then we may need oral medications, and it is not uncommon for someone with type 2 diabetes to eventually need insulin, either with or without the oral medications. Now, type 2 diabetes accounts for approximately 85 to 90 percent of all the diabetics in the country. The other important thing that needs to be said is that type 2 diabetes is associated with heart disease, and that's why it's so important to not only treat the glucose levels, but also to attack blood pressure and cholesterol levels as well. We know that type 2 diabetes runs very strongly from generation to generation, and we also know that we can preve Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nephropathy (kidney Disease)

Diabetic Nephropathy (kidney Disease)

Diabetic nephropathy refers to diabetic kidney disease (nehpro=kidneys, pathy=disease). In 2011, diabetes caused nearly 44% of kidney failure cases. This makes diabetic kidney disease the Number One complication of diabetes; one that is likely to affect almost every diabetic to some extent. In nearly half the cases of kidney disease, it could lead to kidney failure as well. Diabetes and Kidney Damage The kidneys filter nearly 200 quarts of our blood every day. Diabetes is a disease of excess sugar in our blood. Read these two sentences together and the link between diabetes and kidneys becomes obvious! Every single day of our lives, the kidneys perform these functions: Remove waste from our body (in the form of urine) Retain whatever proteins, vitamins and other nutrients we can still use Balance the fluids in the body Help maintain proper blood pressure by managing potassium and calcium levels Keep bones healthy Help make red blood cells. Diabetes damages the kidneys and the urinary system in three main ways: Damage to blood vessels in the kidneys: Too much sugar damages the filters in the kidneys Damage to nerves: Fine nerves in the hands, feet, etc. are corroded by the extra sugar in the blood Damage to the urinary tract: Nerves run from our bladder to our brain and let us know when the bladder is full and we need to go. Damage to these nerves could mean we don’t react when our bladder is full. Result: extra pressure on the kidneys. Retained urine can also allow urinary tract infections to grow and migrate back to the kidneys. Diabetes damage to blood vessels inside kidneys: The filtering units of the kidneys are called glomeruli (sing. – glomerulus). They have tiny blood vessels that are easily clogged and damaged by excess sugar in our blood. Damage to these ve Continue reading >>

Stages Of Beta Cell Dysfunction For Diabetes

Stages Of Beta Cell Dysfunction For Diabetes

Stages Of Beta Cell Dysfunction For Diabetes Stages Of Beta Cell Dysfunction For Diabetes I found the following study today and while it is not new, I searched and didn't see it discussed here before. It postulates that there are 5 stages of beta cell dysfunction leading to diabetes and that they can apply to both Type 1 and Type 2. Stage 1 - Compensation - beta cell mass is normal or increased Stage 2 - Stable Adaptation - Impaired glucose tolerance, borderline beta cell mass, fasting 89-130 Stage 3 - Unstable Early Decompensation - beta cell mass borderline, fasting from 130-285 Stage 4 - Stable Decompensation - reduced beta cell mass, fasting 285-350 Stage 5 - Severe Decompensation - severely reduced beta cell mass, insulin required, fasting >350 The authors state that you can move both forward and backward in these stages (from 4 to 2 for example), although stage 5 seems to be the point of no return. I know this isn't perfect, but I like the idea of breaking it down into pieces. A1c - 4/19/13 - 9.2 | 7/26/13 - 5.1 | 10/18/13 - 5.1 | 4/19/14 - 4.8 D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I remember years ago I was what would be stage 4 and 5 that is where orals did nothing for me. D.D. Family Type 2 since Nov.3, 2004 No meds Age 69 I guess I can safely say I am still in stage 2. I've never had a fasting over 120 and it has been years since I have seen that number. Everyone laughs and smiles in the same language. Washington State, Pacific Northwest of United States Stage 1 - Compensation - beta cell mass is normal or increased Stage 2 - Stable Adaptation - Impaired glucose tolerance, borderline beta cell mass, fasting 89-130 Stage 3 - Unstable Early Decompensation - beta cell mass borderline, fasting from 130-285 Stage 4 - Stable Decompensation - reduced beta cell Continue reading >>

The 6 Stages Of Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

The 6 Stages Of Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Author's Perspective: Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease that develops in stages from insulin resistance to glucose intolerance to prediabetes to full-blown diabetes. You didn't go from being a non-diabetic to being a full-blown diabetic in one jump. Similarly, in order to reverse and defeat Type 2 diabetes, it must be done in stages. You can't go from being diabetic to being non-diabetic in one jump! So, if you are diabetic and you're trying to reverse your diabetes by following a specific diabetes book or program, make sure that they explain the stages of their program. If you'e trying to reverse your diabetes on your own, make sure that you've done your homework and understand the science behind the disease, i.e. cell biology, biochemistry, pathophysiology, pathogenesis, glycation, etc.. Most diabetes programs tell you how they're going to take you from being diabetic to reversing your diabetes by making some diet changes and exercising every day. And, 30 to 90 days later, your diabetes is reversed. Well, if it was that simple and straightforward, then, more people would be successful with reversing their diabetes. If you truly want to reverse your diabetes, you must first be able to get the disease under control; and, then, stop the progression of the disease. Once you do that, then, you can reverse the disease. Based on this understanding and how Type 2 diabetes breaks down the human body at the cellular level, I developed a 3-stage reverse diabetes program. Later, after doing more research, I expanded it to a 6-stage reverse diabetes program. During the initial stages, you focus on getting your blood sugar under control, preferably without the use of diabetic medications. Then, in the latter stages, you focus on stabilizing your blood sugar such that your fa Continue reading >>

The 5 Stages Of Diabetes Acceptance

The 5 Stages Of Diabetes Acceptance

Judith Grout, right, and her husband, Daniel W. Grout, traveled through several stages in their diabetes journey. When my husband returned from his semiannual physical, he marched into our kitchen and slammed down papers on the countertop, proclaiming, My doctor tells me I have diabetes. He pulled out a kitchen chair, scraping the feet along my freshly polished floor, slid onto the padded seat, and propped his fist under his chin. The year was 2007. We were both in our mid-60s, enjoying the newfound freedom that came with retirement. During my career as a clinical laboratory professional, Id done it all: hematology, chemistry, and immunologyto name a few of the specialty areas that encompass laboratory analysis of human body fluids. Id just retired from managing a busy clinical laboratory in a bustling hospital environment in Sun City, Ariz. My husband of 40-plus years was winding down his computer consulting career, anxious to join me in exploring new vistas: traveling, gardening, and enduring the challenges of playing more golf. I picked up the pages of his latest blood work results scattered on the counter. Sure enough. There were his elevated fasting blood glucose and A1C test results, standing out on the page with the insulting bold print intentionally intended to draw the eye to the results and a capital H indicating the results were high. Over a hastily organized lunch, we talked about the implications of this shocking revelationhaving type 2 diabetes . What exactly had his physician told him? What was the next step? Where did this come from? I explained the intricacies of what I knew about treatment options and improvements in protocols Id witnessed over the many years of churning out laboratory test results on people with diabetes. At the end of our meal, we b Continue reading >>

7 Stages Of Diabetes Grief

7 Stages Of Diabetes Grief

When you are faced with the news that you or your child has diabetes there is really a wave of emotions you go through. Personally for me at first it seemed like it was no big deal, “Diabetes” okay we can handle this, limit this and that and ta da! It wasn’t until I was face to face with the doctor’s at children’s hospital watching my son lie in the bed unconscious due to DKA, that this wasn’t the “Diabetes” I had pictured. This in fact was something much more serious. I am a believer that with a life changing event such as a diabetes diagnosis that you follow through the stages of grief as you would when you lose someone you love. Think of diabetes this way. The day you or your loved one is diagnosed you are losing something very precious and important to you, the carefree life from before. You may think you have big problems now, and nothing could be worse than these “problems” but then WHAM! Your smacked in the face hard with a diabetes dx. How do those “problems” look now? We lost the carefree, worry-free, childhood of our oldest child. That my friends are something to grieve about. I didn’t know it then but I really did go through the various stages of grief, and I still revisit a few of them from time to time. For more informative articles read the following: Here is what I refer to as the seven stages of Diabetes Grief: 1. Shock & Denial Diagnosis day is when the shock and denial set in. You are shocked this happened to you or your child, seriously you’ve done everything you could to protect yourself and them so why you, why your child? The denial is a difficult part of the first stage because with a diabetes diagnosis there is no room for denial. You cannot think in the back of your brain that you don’t have it or your child doesn Continue reading >>

5 Stages Of Diabetes Acceptance

5 Stages Of Diabetes Acceptance

Home Health and Wellness 5 Stages of Diabetes Acceptance Posted by Naomi Ruperto On January 20, 2015 In Health and Wellness TuDiabetes blogger , Rick Phillips, has lived with type 1 diabetes for more than 40 years, and grew up with a mother and aunt with type 1 diabetes. In this time, hes come to understand that diabetes is as much an emotional journey as a physical one. The emotional journey is often a twisted road with many detours. Rick believes it is one all people with diabetes must undertake in order to maximize life with diabetes. It is generally agreed that there are five stages of grief. Readers might ask how being diagnosed with diabetes equates to grief. Grief occurs anytime we experience loss. Diabetes fits that description very well, because when diagnosed, one often feels a loss of independence or the opportunity to live life on ones own terms. I know, of course, this is not the case, but for a newly diagnosed person with diabetes, they are often overwhelmed with thoughts of all they have lost. Those feelings of loss often initiate the process of grieving, either for the person with diabetes, the family, or both. The first stage of grief that most experience is denial. One simply decides to live as if we are not a person with diabetes. We do not care what happens to us or how to move past the initial shock of the situation. In order to get past this step, one must first take responsibility for their condition. I believe it is important to encourage as much responsibility for the management of diabetes as soon as possible. Of course there are appropriate boundaries, but the sooner a person takes responsibility the better chance of not becoming stuck in this dangerous stage. One may feel their potential has been tampered with, additional restrictions have b Continue reading >>

Five Stages Of Evolving Beta-cell Dysfunction During Progression To Diabetes

Five Stages Of Evolving Beta-cell Dysfunction During Progression To Diabetes

This article proposes five stages in the progression of diabetes, each of which is characterized by different changes in β-cell mass, phenotype, and function. Stage 1 is compensation: insulin secretion increases to maintain normoglycemia in the face of insulin resistance and/or decreasing β-cell mass. This stage is characterized by maintenance of differentiated function with intact acute glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Stage 2 occurs when glucose levels start to rise, reaching ∼5.0–6.5 mmol/l; this is a stable state of β-cell adaptation with loss of β-cell mass and disruption of function as evidenced by diminished GSIS and β-cell dedifferentiation. Stage 3 is a transient unstable period of early decompensation in which glucose levels rise relatively rapidly to the frank diabetes of stage 4, which is characterized as stable decompensation with more severe β-cell dedifferentiation. Finally, stage 5 is characterized by severe decompensation representing a profound reduction in β-cell mass with progression to ketosis. Movement across stages 1–4 can be in either direction. For example, individuals with treated type 2 diabetes can move from stage 4 to stage 1 or stage 2. For type 1 diabetes, as remission develops, progression from stage 4 to stage 2 is typically found. Delineation of these stages provides insight into the pathophysiology of both progression and remission of diabetes. STAGE 1: COMPENSATION The most common example of compensation is found with the insulin resistance due to obesity, which is accompanied by higher overall rates of insulin secretion (2) and increased acute glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) following an intravenous glucose challenge (3). Much of the increase in insulin secretion undoubtedly results from an increa Continue reading >>

Coping With Diagnosis - Emotional Impact And 5 Stages Of Grief

Coping With Diagnosis - Emotional Impact And 5 Stages Of Grief

Coping With Your Diagnosis: Emotional impact and grief Diabetes diagnosis can bring about feelings of grief The memory of the moment of the diabetes diagnosis is a profound one. Psychologists call it a 'flashbulb' memory, in which you can recall all the exact elements of the moment heard the news, with startling clarity. Dealing with the diabetes diagnosis has been compared to the experience of grief. This is the first psychological guide from Dr Jen Nash and is designed to help people to come to terms with their diabetes diagnosis. There are 3 parts to this guide on coping with diabetes diagnosis: Part 1: Emotional impact of diagnosis and grief Part 3: Using cognitive behavioural therapy The diabetes diagnosis can cause a grieving for your lost health, in the same way as you may grieve for a lost loved one. It is a natural human tendency to live life rarely thinking about our health or mortality. And why should we, until something life-changing happens, such as being diagnosed with a chronic health problem such as diabetes . Suddenly, you are hyper-aware that no life is without its limits. Below is an outline of the stages of grief - do you recognise any of these descriptions in your feelings towards diabetes? Below is an outline of the stages of grief - do you recognise any of the descriptions in your feelings towards diabetes? You may not have experienced all of these emotions towards diabetes, or in this particular order. However, Im sure you can see the similarities between these thoughts about diagnosis, and thoughts you may have when faced when you lose someone close to you. In fact many people fluctuate between these different stages for many years, getting stuck at denial, or between anger, bargaining and depression , perhaps with small acceptances along the w Continue reading >>

The Five Stages Of Grieving Diabetes

The Five Stages Of Grieving Diabetes

Grieving usually is associated with the death of someone or something, a dream, a loved one, a precious item. There are five stages of grieving: denial, anger, depression, bargaining, and acceptance. Everyone handles it differently. Everyone goes through the phases in some form or another, but we have to go through it to fully move on. People with diabetes usually experience these phases when they are first diagnosed. We grieve for our life of normalcy, our life before insulin injections and carb counting. In order to accept our disease and new lifestyle we have to mourn the life we used to know. The first phase I experienced was depression. I remember when I was first diagnosed with diabetes sitting in the exam room and apologizing to my doctor because I was balling my eyes out. Then, calling my mom and having a complete break down. It felt so surreal, I knew about the disease, but I didnt know anything about it. I went home and did what I usually do when I feel the world around me is out of control. I cleaned the house with tears streaming down my face. My best friend at the time came over right after I called her to comfort me; I think she may have even brought me flowers. I remember drying the dishes and telling her everything the doctor said. I felt complete guilt, how did this happen? Could I have done something different to prevent this? Why me? It was the most depressing thing for me at the time. I had just moved away from home to a new town, a new apartment, and a new life. I didnt know how I was going to handle this new condition. Then anger set in. I remember looking at every food label for the first time. Everything had carbs in it! I was so upset; I didnt know what to eat other than water and vegetables. And at that time in my life Id rather go hungry. Luc Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Disease (stages 1-4)

Diabetes And Kidney Disease (stages 1-4)

What is diabetes? Diabetes happens when your body does not make enough insulin or cannot use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone. It controls how much sugar is in your blood. A high level of sugar in your blood can cause problems in many parts of your body, including your heart, kidneys, eyes, and brain. Over time, this can lead to kidney disease and kidney failure. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes generally begins when people are young. In this case, the body does not make enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes is usually found in adults over 40, but is becoming more common in younger people. It is usually associated with being overweight and tends to run in families. In type 2 diabetes, the body makes insulin, but cannot use it well. What is chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Your kidneys are important because they keep the rest of your body in balance. They: Remove waste products from the body Balance the body’s fluids Help keep blood pressure under control Keep bones healthy Help make red blood cells. When you have kidney disease, it means that the kidneys have been damaged. Kidneys can get damaged from a disease like diabetes. Once your kidneys are damaged, they cannot filter your blood nor do other jobs as well as they should. When diabetes is not well controlled, the sugar level in your blood goes up. This is called hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) can cause damage to many parts of your body, especially the kidneys, heart, blood vessels, eyes, feet, nerves. Diabetes can harm the kidneys by causing damage to: Blood vessels inside your kidneys. The filtering units of the kidney are filled with tiny blood vessels. Over time, high sugar levels in the blood can cause these vessels to become narrow and clogged. Without enough blood, the kid Continue reading >>

Five Stages Of Diabetes: Pick Up High Insulin And Blood Sugar Levels Early

Five Stages Of Diabetes: Pick Up High Insulin And Blood Sugar Levels Early

FIVE STAGES OF DIABETES: BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS & INSULIN DYSFUNCTION Did you know there are 5 stages of blood sugar and insulin dysfunction leading to full blown diabetes, Most, walk around without knowing their blood sugar levels are high. Upon the diagnosis of diabetes there is a typical sense of shock or disbelief, yet at the same time it represents an estimated 13 year losing battle for the pancreas as food choice triggers excess insulin release and the pancreas loses function. Prevention and intervention should focus on stage 1, the earliest point of dysfunction which is insulin resistance. Unfortunately because clinicians focus on blood sugar and not insulin as a standard test, years are lost and treatment typically begins at stage 3 when high blood sugar levels are present. The Stages of Diabetes Stage 1, insulin resistance: Blood sugar levels seem normal because the pancreas balances high blood sugar by releasing higher amounts of insulin. Stage 2, blood sugar levels rise (pre-diabetes): The pancreas has difficulty keeping up with the demand of producing more insulin to maintain normal levels of blood sugar. The pancreas becomes fatigued from overworking and it puts out less insulin, blood sugar levels begin to rise. Stage 3, high blood sugar levels (diabetes): Damage to the pancreas begins, insulin output cannot cover the rise in blood sugar levels rise more quickly. Stage 4, damage to the pancreas (diabetes): An elevation in blood sugar level is the result of years of the pancreas overworking. The pancreas works excessively to lower blood sugar. Stage 5, Failed pancreas (diabetes): The pancreas produces too little insulin, or none . Need insulin injections to survive. Early DETECTION: Before Blood Sugar Levels Rise There may not be any symptoms, or symptoms may n Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

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