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5 2 Diet Diabetes Type 1

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting with Type 1 Diabetes If your first reaction to intermittent fasting with type 1 diabetes isOh my gosh, my blood sugar would be so low! I could never do that! then definitely keep reading. In this guide, I will cover everything you need to know about intermittent fasting with type 1 diabetes: Whats the point of intermittent fasting? There are 3 general reasons a person might want to pursue intermittent fasting. Weight-loss: This is the most obvious and most common reason to give it a try. Simplicity: Reducing the number of hours each day that you have to think about food, track food, make decisions around food, and cook food can be really freeing! Instead of frantically and unexpectedly skipping meals because of a hectic schedule, intermittent fasting allows you to properly and methodically skip eating during parts of the time. Energy: Once you get going, and youre no longer freaking out about, How hungry will I feel!?!this approach to eating can actually give you quite a boost of energy because your body will be burning fat for fuel instead of relying on sugar from your blood. Body fat is an endless source of energy. Before we get started: if your blood sugar drops just because you dont eat for a handful of hours, youre taking too much background/basal insulin via pump or injection. Talk to your CDE or primary care doctor about basal testing. (Or check out Gary Scheiners book, Think Like a Pancreas and do the basal testing yourself!) Basal testing literally consists of purposefully skipping a meal (or two) in order to see if your insulin keeps your blood sugar steady, or if your blood sugar significantly rises or falls out of your personal goal range. If it rises, youre not getting enough background/basal insulin. If it falls, then youre clearly ge Continue reading >>

Intermittent Dieting Has More Negatives Than Positives For Weight Loss.

Intermittent Dieting Has More Negatives Than Positives For Weight Loss.

The New Zealand researchers found the risk of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) was increased during the fasting days, as expected, but that the two intermittent fasting plans they tested still managed to produce weight loss and a drop in A1c levels, which is used to assess your risk for diabetes;1 the study is published in Diabetic Medicine. However, three endocrinology experts who reviewed and commented on the study for EndocrineWeb say other approaches are less hazardous and just as, or more effective in producing a healthy weight loss. Evaluating the Research on Intermittent Fasting Researchers from Wellington Hospital and the University of Otago in New Zealand defined intermittent fasting a bit differently than we do here in the US. Participants could eat whatever they wanted five days a week and then they were instructed to fast for the next two days.1 They had to do this for 12 weeks. In this study, the ''fast'' was actually a very low-calorie diet. Men could eat about 600 calories on a fast day and women were limited to 500 calories. At the start, 41 participants who had been living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) for years were randomly assigned to this 5:2 plan, as it is sometimes called. About half of them were instructed to fast for two days in a row during the week; the others were instructed to fast on non-consecutive days. In the consecutive fasting group, the average age was 62 years and their diabetes diagnosis had been made 13 years ago, on average. In the non-consecutive group, the average age was 58 years, and their diagnosis had been made 9 years earlier.1 The men and women were on a variety of medications, including insulin, sulfonylureas, metformin, and oral hypoglycemic agents.1 The researchers made adjustments to their medications in response to lower Continue reading >>

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

I spend a great deal of time in my clinic dealing with the problems of type 2 diabetes. But occasionally, people ask about type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well. The reason why it is so rare for me is that I treat adult patients where T2D outnumbers T1D by at least 9:1. I was looking at a fascinating study that my friend, Ivor Cummins (The Fat Emperor) had alerted me to a few months ago. Dr. Richard Bernstein is a fascinating character. He had developed T1D as a child of twelve and began to have complications by his 30s. He eventually went to medical school in order to learn better how to treat his own disease. Eventually he decided that the proper treatment was a low carb diet. This was in direct contradiction to the prevailing wisdom of the time (1990s), which included treating patients with insulin and a diet high in carbs. Dr. Bernstein opened up a controversial clinic to treat T1D with a low carb diet and also wrote several best selling books discussing the same topic. Over the years, it has proven to be a safe treatment for T1D. While there are few long-term studies, Dr. Bernstein himself is living proof of the low carb T1D paradigm. In many ways, T1D and T2D are exact opposites of each other. T1D typically affects children who are usually quite skinny. T2D typically affects adults who are usually quite obese. This is not absolute, and we are seeing much more T2D in children as their weights have increased. There are also cases of normal or even underweight patients with T2D. But in general, that is the case. T1D is the severe deficiency of insulin where as T2D is the severe excess of insulin. Nevertheless, people often treat both types of diabetes in the same manner. Both are treated with medications or insulin to keep blood glucose in acceptable levels. Wait, you might Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

5-2 Diet & Type 1 | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

5-2 Diet & Type 1 | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Not interested in people's opinion on the diet itself, just wondering if anyone's tried it and if it affected bg Didn't do the 5-2 which sounds like more of a fad derived from intermittent fasting. I am currently doing intermittent fasting with regard to carbs where I fit all my carbs into one or two meals within a 6 hour window so I only have one(or two) blood sugar spikes a day and can rely on my basal to keep my bg steady for the rest of the day. I find it makes it easier to make adjustments to my basal when I'm not having regular spikes from multiple meals. Not really the same thing but posted anyway. It helped keep my HbA1c low since switching from low to high carb. Not interested in people's opinion on the diet itself, just wondering if anyone's tried it and if it affected bg I was doing 5-2 until I was diagnosed, but in the book it states that it's not suitable for T1s...Might keep going with it though and see what happens. I was doing 5-2 until I was diagnosed, but in the book it states that it's not suitable for T1s...Might keep going with it though and see what happens. Its not recommended as initially you would be using less insulin due to less daily carb intake and from what I've heard of the diet you try and hit ketosis(not sure if most people do this) but I would imagine you gain some amount of insulin resistance due to triglycerides present in your blood and their subsequent use for energy. If you have decent insulin management I don't see how it could hurt Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Can You Do A 24h Fast With Type 1 Diabetes?

Can You Do A 24h Fast With Type 1 Diabetes?

Can You Do A 24h Fast With Type 1 Diabetes? Recently, Ive read a lot about fasting, intermittent fasting and how to do it. Intermittent fasting can be done in many ways, depending on your preferences and lifestyle, and basically means to cut down on calories for a limited period of time, to give the body a chance to use its own reserves. This can be especially helpful if youre trying to lose weight, or keep your blood glucose levels more stable. In some cases, these two are interlinked (read: Type 2 Diabetes). What is important to remember is to stilleat enough calories. You just do it within a limited time window.Intermittent fasting makes your body use the energy (food) consumed more efficiently. And no, skipping a meal (or even two) wont send your body into a crisis-starvation mode. That takes a good few days to happen. Intermittent fasting usually has numbers attached to it, depending on how long youre fasting for; 5:2 means youre restricting calories on 2 days of the week, while eating normal the other 5. 20:4 means you fast for 20 hours, eating one or more meals within the remaining 4 hours. 24/36/48/72:0 simply means a 24/36/48/72 hour fast. 16:8 means you eat your meals within an 8 hour time span, fasting the remaining 16 hours. Ive done a 16:8 fast in my daily life for a few months now. For me it works really well, as it enables me to keep my blood glucose levels more stable for a longer period of time (which is really beneficial on so many levels!). And to be honest, in practice it only means skipping breakfast, and eating lunch and dinner as normal. This feels doable for me, and I can easily function without having breakfast every day. But, is a 24 hour possible to do with insulin dependent Type 1 Diabetes as your BFF? I decided to test it out, in the name o Continue reading >>

The 5:2 Fast Diet With Type 1 Diabetes

The 5:2 Fast Diet With Type 1 Diabetes

Against medical advice I am trying the 5:2 diet with Type 1 diabetes. I find it easy to lose weight and I am still working on the best way to avoid hypos. Key to this is whether to alter my background (basal) insulin and this takes trial and error to work out. My typical weight before begining the 5:2 diet was 12 stone, 3 pounds (12:3). Before starting the diet I fasted for a day to see what it was like and my starting weight was 12:1¾ or 169.75 pounds. At the same time I had a diabetes check up which measured my cholesterol, blood pressure and HbA1c. My key aims were: to see if the 5:2 diet reduces my cholesterol enough to prevent the doctors badgering me about statins, To reduce my blood pressure so that I can avoid taking drugs for that, and of course a slimmer profile wouldn’t go amiss. Finally: My cholesterol and blood pressure was measured a long time after the diet had ended but I was still at my target weight. Weight loss did not improve my cholesterol and blood pressure. My Target weight. Initially I wanted to be medium weight for my height and that is 12:7 but as I approached that level I could see that mid weight meant carrying quite a bit of fat. I wondered what it would be like to be less that mid weight. I want to know what it is like to weigh 11 stone and to see what my cholesterol and blood pressure levels would be. So I have set a target weight of 10 stone, 12 pounds (152lb) for the day after fasting. That means with the normal day to day weight variation that you can see in my daily weight graph my typical weight would be 11 stone. The red line (7 day average) should level out at 152lb and be maintained with 6:1 fasting. I record my progress with observations that could be useful for Type 1 diabetics and for medics. You could call it a Diary of a Ty Continue reading >>

The Diabetics Guide To Intermittent Fasting

The Diabetics Guide To Intermittent Fasting

Is IF safe for people with diabetes? Will IF get results for people with diabetes? IF is becoming very popular. There are a wide range of different fasting methods, some of the most popular include: Eat Stop Eat 5:2 Diet (participants limit their calorie intake on two days per week) 16:8 diet 18:6 diet Generally speaking, IF works well for people who are looking to lose body fat, fast-paced individuals who struggle to get the time to eat multiple meals per day and people with diabetes wanting to improve their HBA1C In respect to diabetes management, The typical Intermittent 18 hour fast followed by a 6 hour eating window can help improve HBA1C levels. If you stop eating at 6:00 pm your quick acting insulin is pretty much out of your system by 10:00pm (bedtime). Provided your blood glucose is within target range and your background insulin is dosed correctly, your next 18 hours (until 12:00pm the next day) will sit well inside range. Solid diabetes control means a good HBA1C and less likelihood of complications. Other intermittent fasting methods like the 16 hour (fast)/8 hour (eat) window also work well. If you have a bit of dawn phenomenon you may need a unit or two of quick acting insulin to prevent high blood glucose. How much insulin you need to take is largely based on your calorie needs for your specific goal, stress, level of activity and some trial and error. In respect to fat loss, The latest consensus statement from the ISSN on body comp and diets (which we have reviewed extensively inside the Training Lab) concludes IF has no significant benefits on body composition over other methods that drive a daily calorie deficit. The basic concept of Intermittent fasting is grounded on the limited feeding window of 6 to 8 hours. This narrow eating window makes it harde Continue reading >>

The Fastday Forum 5:2 And Diabetes Type 1

The Fastday Forum 5:2 And Diabetes Type 1

Was very interested to find your post and the associated reply thank you carorees for actually giving a considered answer rather than just saying 'No' to 5:2 for type 1's. It has given me a bit more confidence that what I'm doing is OK. I was first diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the old age of 28 (now 41), and being stubborn, do not like to be told I can't do something because of my condition! So I decided to try 5:2 fasting - but sensibly and in a very controlled manner. I religiously, daily, persistently and successfully manage my diabetes with the DAFNE regime - Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating, I would really recommend you get yourself DAFNE trained first. Its not easy to get on the course, there were waiting lists in my healthcare area, and it was only that I had got to meltdown stage with my diabetes (crashing hypos, mum with 2 young kids, and the more I tried to control hypos without the knowledge and understanding I now have, the worse I made everything) that I managed to get onto the 5 day training course. It was the course that changed my life, I now understand how to adjust my basal insulin and check if I have the dose correct, how to correct highs and lows, and to calculate how much insulin I actually need for whatever I want to eat - and I really can eat anything now without highs or hypos. So, armed with this knowledge, I started fasting around 3 weeks ago. I find that I adjust my basal insulin down by a unit on the night before a fast day, and during the fast day just inject as normal according to my foods carbo content. I check my blood sugars at least 4 times a day as usual and adjust if necessary according to the DAFNE rules. I have lost around 2kgs (I started at 60kgs and my BMI 24) and on the fast days have bags of energy and though still feel p Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes Heres The Science

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes Heres The Science

Intermittent fasting could help tackle diabetes heres the science The 5:2 diet consists of long periods of unrestricted eating and short periods of eating very little / Shutterstock There is growing evidence that the fad could actually have health benefits Intermittent fasting is currently all the rage. But dont be fooled: its much more than just the latest fad. Recent studies of this kind of fasting with restricted eating part of the time, but not all of the time have produced a number of successes, but the latest involving diabetes might be the most impressive yet. The idea of intermittent fasting arose after scientists were impressed by the effects of constant calorie restriction. A number of studies in many different animals have shown that restricted eating throughout adulthood leads to dramatic improvements in lifespan and general health. The reasons for these improvements arent yet clear. Part of it seems to be that going without food gives cells in the body a much needed break to perform maintenance and repair. But the lack of food also forces cells to resort to alternative sources of energy. Some of these, such as ketones molecules created in the liver from recycled fat appear to be beneficial. The problem is that constant calorie restriction isnt practical: its easy for scientists to impose upon lab animals, but hard for humans to impose upon themselves in the real world. Fortunately, weve learnt that constant calorie restriction isnt really necessary. Intermittent fasting seems to have many of the same benefits. There are two main types of intermittent fasting. One type, known as time restricted feeding, requires eating only during a few hours of the day say between 10am and 6pm. This approach gives the body a long break from food each night, and also reinfo Continue reading >>

Review: The Fast Diet By Dr Michael Mosley

Review: The Fast Diet By Dr Michael Mosley

Review: The Fast Diet by Dr Michael Mosley I picked up the book The Fast Diet after a lousy day last week, and quickly became engrossed in it. Youve probably heard of the author, Dr Michael Mosley, from his show Trust Me Im a Doctor on SBS (which is an excellent alternative to some of the manufacturedreality showsonat the moment).Michael has a family history of diabetes, and began to explore intermittent fastingsome years ago when his doctor told him he was at risk of developing type 2. Better known as the 5:2 diet, the basic idea is that you eat 500-600 calories for two days of the week, ideally incorporatinga fasting window of 12 hours or more on a fastingday. The remainder of the time, you are allowed to eat normally.Many fans observe that it doesnt feel like a diet, because tomorrow youll be able to eat whatever you want. Its a sustainable way to lose weight and keep it off. Over time, youll better recognise hunger and have less of an appetite for large or unhealthy meals. The book is peppered with plenty of research, facts and statistics supporting the idea of intermittent fasting.Michael explains that people in primitive times did not eat four of five times a day like we do today. They would feast when they came across food, and would often go without for long periods of time inbetween where food was scarce. I found it remarkable that the average time inbetween eating occasions has dropped by an average of an hour in the last 30 years. Thinking about myself alone, I would struggle to last inbetween meals without having something even if its just a coffee. At school and work, I have been engineered to have morning recess and coffee breaks, which inevitably come with the desire for food. Diabetes mags seem to encourage this notion that we have to keep eating to avo Continue reading >>

5:2 Fasting Diet

5:2 Fasting Diet

Tweet The 5:2 intermittent fasting (IF) diet, more commonly referred to simply as the 5:2 diet, has become one of the more popular diet plan in recent years. Studies have shown that the diet helps with weight loss and may also reduce insulin resistance, both of which are of particular interest for many people with type 2 diabetes or borderline diabetes. One reason for the popularity of the diet is that it allows a certain amount of flexibility, in comparison to low calorie diets, on most days of the week. Theory behind the diet The idea of the diet is that short periods of fasting prompt the body to repair damage but not enter a starvation mode of conserving energy. Whilst the theory has yet to be conclusively proved, clinical studies have shown promising results for the diet, however it has only been examined over relatively short time spans, of less than a year. How the 5:2 diet works The 5:2 intermittent fasting diet is based on a simple idea. 5 days a week you stick to meeting the daily calorie intake advised for people of a healthy weight, that being: 2,500 kcal per day for men 2,000 kcal per day for women For the other 2 days each week, the diet stipulates that you have only around 25% of the values above, which is equal to: 600 kcal on these days for men 500 kcal on these days for women The fasting days can be taken at any time during the week as long as you do not take 2 fasting days consecutively. Benefits of the 5:2 diet Clinical studies have shown that the benefits of intermittent fasting are largely similar to those of a calorie restricted diets. The most commonly reported benefits among people from following the 5:2 diet: Research has shown that periods of fasting can help to improve life expectancy and decrease risks of diseases including nerve disorders, Continue reading >>

5:2 Diet - Total Diabetes Care

5:2 Diet - Total Diabetes Care

You would think with all the cycling I have been doing I would be fading away, but the truth is that weight loss is 80 to 90% about the food you eat. There are countless diet approaches out there, some are nutritionally sound while others are not. The trick is to find the right (nutritionally sound) one for you. The CSIRO diet works for some, others swear by the Mediterranean diet, while others have had great success with the traditional just eat less everyday approach. For me, because my social life revolves around catching up with friends for a coffee or a meal, its intermittent energy restriction. The 5:2 fast diet, a form of intermittent energy restriction, became all the craze a few years ago after Michael Mosely, a UK based medical reporter, was featured on the ABC Catalyst program. The 5:2 fast diet involves lowering your food intake to 500 calories a day for women and 600 calories a day for men, 2 days a week, and then eating to appetite the rest of the week. Enough of the people I see were interested in trying this diet that I joined with colleagues at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and The University of Sydney to conduct a pilot study to see if intermittent fasting was safe for people with diabetes. We hope to present our results at this years American Scientific Meeting in San Diego. So far we have had good success with intermittent fasting, in both people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but it is important to work with your diabetes team if you want to follow this diet. You will probably need your diabetes medication adjusted. You will also need to keep a closer eye on your blood glucose levels, although these two things are true of any change in your diet. Let me know if you would like to know more about the 5:2 fasting approach or if you want help find Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

I’m sure that at least a few of you have heard or read about the latest trend in weight loss called “intermittent fasting.” The very word “fasting” is probably less than appealing, as it pretty much means you don’t eat or drink anything (except perhaps water) for a specified amount of time. Starvation is not exactly recommended among health professionals. But intermittent fasting is different. Is it something you should try? What is intermittent fasting, anyway? Intermittent fasting has been the talk of the town, so to speak, thanks to two recent books to hit the market: The Fast Diet by Dr. Michael Mosley and Mimi Spencer, and The Overnight Diet by Caroline Apovian, MD. Intermittent fasting essentially means that you skip a meal or severely restrict calories on certain days of the week with the intention of losing weight, controlling blood glucose, and/or decreasing heart disease risk. But on the other days of the week, you can pretty much eat what you want (within reason, of course). For many people, this concept sounds appealing. Limiting calories for a couple days a week doesn’t sound that bad if you can eat what you want the rest of the time. The Fast Diet, also called the The 5:2 Diet has you eat between 500 and 600 calories (women get 500 calories, men get 600 calories) for two days out of the week, spread over two meals of about 250 to 300 calories. These fast days should not be right in a row, and your food choices ideally should be more plant-based and emphasize protein. The premise is that after several hours of fasting, the body burns up its carbohydrate stores and shifts to burning fat for fuel. Many claim that intermittent fasting also helps to blunt appetite. The Overnight Diet emphasizes getting enough sleep; a lack of sleep can disrupt met Continue reading >>

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