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220 Mg/dl Blood Sugar

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

It takes work to manage your type 2 diabetes. That includes the little things you do every day, such as what you eat and how active you are. Start by avoiding these common mistakes. Your medical team is essential. But you're not in the doctor's office every day. “You are your own doctor 99.9% of the time,” says Andrew Ahmann, MD. He's director of the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University. You’re the one in charge, so it’s up to you to watch your diet, exercise, and take your medication on schedule. You can make better decisions about how to track and manage your diabetes by understanding how the disease works. Sign up for a class or a support group on managing diabetes. “Not enough patients seek them out, and not enough doctors send their patients to them," Ahmann says. "Not only do these resources offer essential information, but they also bring together people who have the same challenges, giving them a place to meet and talk with each other." It's a big step to shift your eating and exercise habits. You need to give it time to see results and for it to feel permanent. “Most people expect something dramatic is going to happen right away,” says UCLA endocrinologist Preethi Srikanthan, MD. “But it has taken them a decade or two to get to this point, and it will take a while for them to even get to that initial 5% to 10% reduction in weight.” To make a lasting change, take small steps, Ahmann says. If you try to do more than you can handle, you might quit. Before you start a new exercise program, talk with your doctor, especially if you aren’t active now. They can help you set goals and plan a routine that’s safe and effective. Continue reading >>

Seeking How To Balance Your Child Blood Glucose

Seeking How To Balance Your Child Blood Glucose

Checking blood glucose levels is the best way to tell how well your child is balancing her insulin, food, and exercise. To make sure your child’s blood glucose level is not too high or too low, your diabetes team will help find a blood glucose target range. For example, a target range for a toddler might be de 110-210 mgr %. If your child’s blood glucose level is 140 mgr%, it is considered normal because it falls inside the range. If it falls above 210 mgr% or below 100mgr%, you may need to adjust your child’s insulin or food intake. Setting the blood glucose target range (type 1) The blood sugar targets change as your child grows and develops. Target ranges are set by your child’s ability and your own ability to understand diabetes, interpret signs and feelings of low blood sugar levels, and act on them. They are worked out with the diabetes team. Everyone on the team should have the same goals. Blood glucose target ranges (type 1 diabetes) Age • Characteristic / ability Acceptable target range (before meals) Infants / toddlers / preschoolers: • Cannot sense or tell you the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar reaction • Eating is not predictable. 110-220 mg /dl (6-12 mmol/L) School-age children and some young adolescents: • Eating is more predictable (meal plan) • Can sense and tell you symptoms of low blood sugar reaction. • Somewhat lacking in judgment. • Depends on others to adjust treatment and plan ahead. 70-180 mg/dl (4-10 mmol/L) Most adolescents and young adults: • Able to follow a meal plan and eat predictably. • Can recognize and treat low blood sugar reactions. • Understands the concept of balance. • Able to plan ahead. 70-145 mg/dl (4-8 mmol/L) For those on insulin pumps, the range may be: Before meals 70-125 mg% After meals Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies, Diagnosis And Clinical Management: Sick-day Rules In Diabetes, Case Studies

Diabetic Emergencies, Diagnosis And Clinical Management: Sick-day Rules In Diabetes, Case Studies

Konstantinos Makrilakis, Nikolaos Katsilambros A 28-year-old man with Type 1 diabetes for 12 years is under treatment with long-lasting insulin (e.g., insulin glargine) 26 IU at bedtime and a rapid-acting insulin analog (e.g., insulin lispro) three times a day before each meal (the dose determined depending on the carbohydrate content of the meal and the preprandial blood glucose level. The usual daily dose of insulin lispro is 22-24 IU). His glycemic control is quite good (recent HbA1c: 6.7%). The patient calls his physician in the morning because he has been vomiting all night, has developed abdominal pains, and has a temperature of 38° C (100.4° F). His blood glucose level in the morning was 312 mg/dl (17.3 mmol/L). He was out at a party the previous night and was not able to hold anything down this morning, not even water. The doctor initially asked the patient to check his urine for ketones with a special urine strip (that the patient had been instructed in the past to have at home) and call him back. A few minutes later the patient informed the doctor that the urine test was positive for ketones (2+). Based on the guidelines analyzed above, the doctor recommended the injection of 10 IU of insulin lispro subcutaneously (20% of the total daily dose) and repeat blood glucose measurement and ketones in 2-3 hours. At the same time he asked the patient to try to sip tea slowly (at least one cup every 30-45 minutes), and to call again if urine ketones persisted after 6 hours (or earlier if they increased) or if blood glucose level was persistently higher than 300 mg/dl (16.7 mmol/L), despite the administration of insulin. Two and a half hours later the patient had a blood glucose level of 230 mg/dl (12.8 mmol/L) and urine ketones had decreased to 1+. The tea had been r Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms

High Blood Sugar Symptoms

If you’ve had diabetes for any length of time at all, you’ve probably seen lists of the signs and symptoms of high blood glucose dozens of times. Doctors and diabetes educators hand them out. Hundreds of websites reprint them. Most diabetes books list them. You likely know some of the items on the list by heart: thirst, frequent urination, blurry vision, slow healing of cuts, and more. But have you ever stopped to wonder why these symptoms occur? How does high blood glucose cause frequent urination, make your vision go blurry, or cause all of those other things to happen? Here are some answers to explain what’s going on in your body when you have high blood glucose. Setting the stage for high blood glucose High blood glucose (called hyperglycemia by medical professionals) is the defining characteristic of all types of diabetes. It happens when the body can no longer maintain a normal blood glucose level, either because the pancreas is no longer making enough insulin, or because the body’s cells have become so resistant to insulin that the pancreas cannot keep up, and glucose is accumulating in the bloodstream rather than being moved into the cells. What is high blood sugar? Blood glucose is commonly considered too high if it is higher than 130 mg/dl before a meal or higher than 180 mg/dl two hours after the first bite of a meal. However, most of the signs and symptoms of high blood glucose don’t appear until the blood glucose level is higher than 250 mg/dl. Some of the symptoms have a rapid onset, while others require a long period of high blood glucose to set in. It’s important to note that individuals differ in their sensitivity to the effects of high blood glucose: Some people feel symptoms more quickly or more strongly than others. But each sign or sympt Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose And Insulin

Blood Glucose And Insulin

Checking Your Blood Glucose Q: WHY SHOULD I MONITOR MY BLOOD GLUCOSE? A: Checking your blood glucose gives you the information you need to understand how your diabetes treatment plan is working. Check your blood glucose several times per day at specific times, such as before a meal and two hours after. Look at the results from a period of several days or a week. You can see patterns in the times your blood glucose is up or down. You’ll see how your food, a regular walk, a stressful day or the addition of a new medication affects your blood glucose. Q: WHERE DO I BEGIN? A: First, talk with your health care providers to set your blood glucose targets. If your blood glucose is not within your target range most of the time, work with your health care provider, diabetes educator and/or Walgreens pharmacist to review your blood glucose monitoring records. Perhaps a simple change, such as being more physically active or eating different foods, can help you get closer to your targets. Over time, you will learn more about how to keep your blood glucose levels on track. Q: WHAT IS THE A1C TEST? A: Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the A1c test is the most accurate, important and meaningful test for finding out your overall glucose control. A1c shows your average blood glucose for the two months to three months before the test. It also tells you your risk for complications. Research has shown that the closer your A1c is to normal (six percent or less), the less likely you are to develop complications, such as damage to the retina, kidney disease or nerve damage. It’s helpful to compare the A1c test result with your blood glucose monitoring results. Ask yourself if they make sense. If they don’t, you may need to check your blood glucose more often or at different ti Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level

Blood Sugar Level

The fluctuation of blood sugar (red) and the sugar-lowering hormone insulin (blue) in humans during the course of a day with three meals. One of the effects of a sugar-rich vs a starch-rich meal is highlighted.[1] The blood sugar level, blood sugar concentration, or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose present in the blood of humans and other animals. Glucose is a simple sugar and approximately 4 grams of glucose are present in the blood of humans at all times.[2] The body tightly regulates blood glucose levels as a part of metabolic homeostasis.[2] Glucose is stored in skeletal muscle and liver cells in the form of glycogen;[2] in fasted individuals, blood glucose is maintained at a constant level at the expense of glycogen stores in the liver and skeletal muscle.[2] In humans, glucose is the primary source of energy, and is critical for normal function, in a number of tissues,[2] particularly the human brain which consumes approximately 60% of blood glucose in fasted, sedentary individuals.[2] Glucose can be transported from the intestines or liver to other tissues in the body via the bloodstream.[2] Cellular glucose uptake is primarily regulated by insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas.[2] Glucose levels are usually lowest in the morning, before the first meal of the day, and rise after meals for an hour or two by a few millimoles. Blood sugar levels outside the normal range may be an indicator of a medical condition. A persistently high level is referred to as hyperglycemia; low levels are referred to as hypoglycemia. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by persistent hyperglycemia from any of several causes, and is the most prominent disease related to failure of blood sugar regulation. There are different methods of testing and measuring blood sugar le Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 220 mg/dl after eating? (or 12.21mmol/l) Blood sugar 220 mg/dl (12.21mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 220 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 80mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones s Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Nerve damage, nerve pain and numbness or tingling in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy) Individuals with diabetes are not able to convert blood sugar into energy either because on insufficient levels of insulin or because their insulin is simply not functioning correctly. This means that glucose stays in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Diabetes takes two distinct forms: Type 1 and type 2. Diagnosing hyperglycemia is done by assessing symptoms and performing a simple blood glucose test. Depending on the severity of the condition and which type of diabetes the patient is diagnosed with, insulin and a variety of medication may be prescribed to help the person keep their blood sugar under control. Insulin comes in short, long and fast-acting forms, and a person suffering from type 1 diabetes is likely to be prescribed some combination of these. Individuals who are either diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or are considered at risk for the disease are recommended to make alterations to their diet, lifestyle habits and exercise routine in order to lower blood sugar and keep it under control. These changes generally help to improve blood glucose control, individuals with type 2 diabetes may require medication eventually. These can include glitazones, acarbose, glucophage or sulphonylureas. Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 220 mg/dl after eating? (or 12.21mmol/l) Blood sugar 220 mg/dl (12.21mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 220 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 80mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones s Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

We took my daughter to the doctor because she had been cold for a couple months. When the temperature was 85 degrees and humid, she was huddled under a blanket. She is 3 years old and weighs 35 pounds. They tested her metabolites because my wife and mother-in-law both have problems with the thyroid and take Synthroid. My daughter's blood glucose was 377 mg/dl [20.9 mmol/L]. They called us to say she had type 1 diabetes and that we needed to check a fasting blood sugar the following morning and start insulin right after. Her fasting blood sugar the following morning was 109 mg/dl [6.1 mmol/L] and was 97 mg/dl [5.4 mmol/L] two hours later when we were in the diabetic educator's office. The A1c was 220 mg/dl [12.2 mmol/L] (the average from the last two to three months, I was told). Two hours after eating a small bag of Cheetos, my daughter's blood sugar was 340 mg/dl [18.9 mmol/L]. We started her on two units of Lantus that night, with a sliding scale of.5 units per serving of carbohydrates (about 15 to 20 grams) with each meal the following day. That weekend, we had problems keeping her readings above 100 mg/dl [5.6 mmol/L], which is the lowest end of the range they prescribed (100 to 200 mg/dl [5.6 to 11.1 mmol/L]). We decided to give less insulin than was prescribed because she was running so low. We called and made an appointment with a pediatric endocrinologist for Tuesday. With the low numbers, she took her off the NovoLog with meals and left her on Lantus. We gradually decreased the amount of Lantus over the next three days due to lows, eventually eliminating it for two weeks, although my daughter's blood sugar would rise to 250 to 300 mg/dl [13.9 to 16.7 mmol/L] after meals. During this time, her blood sugars were 60 to 70 mg/dl [3.3 to 3.9 mmol/L] before meals an Continue reading >>

Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels

Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels

What are the dangerous levels for blood sugar? What is a dangerously high blood sugar level? How low a blood glucose reading is dangerous? I understand that all the above questions are huge problems for the diabetic mind and health. Don’t worry. Relax. Remember: stress is your enemy in your fight against diabetes. Why? During stress, your body produces some hormones that increase the blood sugar levels, and at the same time, they inhibit the insulin function. No Charge Glucose Meter - OneTouch Verio Flex® Meter Ad Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch Learn more As a consequence, you’ll have high blood sugar levels, which will help you face your “stress situation”. On the other hand, these levels can reach the highest peak (uncontrollable), and then, they are considered as dangerous high blood glucose level. What are the dangerously high blood sugar levels? Normally, in a diabetic, blood sugar levels will always stay high. During stress, more “sugar” is added to your blood, which then, turn to “become” dangerous. This is because your body will find it hard to bring them normal again. Furthermore, persistent high blood glucose level will cause many problems to all your body cells. How to recognize and distinguish these dangerous levels? All you need to do is to regularly check your glucose level. In case your blood sugar level is more than 200 mg/dl, persisting for more than two days, then this is considered as dangerous level, and you need further evaluation. Then, if you check your blood sugar, and have results higher than 300 mg/dl, together with urine incontinence, dry and cracked tongue, all these figures show you the danger of your situation too. Therefore, it’s time to search for specialist help. When you Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Nerve damage, nerve pain and numbness or tingling in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy) Individuals with diabetes are not able to convert blood sugar into energy either because on insufficient levels of insulin or because their insulin is simply not functioning correctly. This means that glucose stays in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Diabetes takes two distinct forms: Type 1 and type 2. Diagnosing hyperglycemia is done by assessing symptoms and performing a simple blood glucose test. Depending on the severity of the condition and which type of diabetes the patient is diagnosed with, insulin and a variety of medication may be prescribed to help the person keep their blood sugar under control. Insulin comes in short, long and fast-acting forms, and a person suffering from type 1 diabetes is likely to be prescribed some combination of these. Individuals who are either diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or are considered at risk for the disease are recommended to make alterations to their diet, lifestyle habits and exercise routine in order to lower blood sugar and keep it under control. These changes generally help to improve blood glucose control, individuals with type 2 diabetes may require medication eventually. These can include glitazones, acarbose, glucophage or sulphonylureas. Continue reading >>

Tailoring Your Dose To Raise Blood Glucose

Tailoring Your Dose To Raise Blood Glucose

This table takes body weight and blood glucose level into consideration to show you how many grams of carbohydrate youll need to raise your blood glucose level to about 120 mg/dl. Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 60s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 60s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 60s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 60s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 60s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 50s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 50s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 50s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 50s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 50s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 40s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 40s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 40s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 40s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 40s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 30s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 30s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 30s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 30s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 30s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 20s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 20s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 20s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 20s Starting blood glucose level (mg/dl): 20s Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Diabetes is an ancient disease, but the first effective drug therapy was not available until 1922, when insulin revolutionized the management of the disorder. Insulin is administered by injection, but treatment took another great leap forward in 1956, when the first oral diabetic drug was introduced. Since then, dozens of new medications have been developed, but scientists are still learning how best to use them. And new studies are prompting doctors to re-examine a fundamental therapeutic question: what level of blood sugar is best? Normal metabolism To understand diabetes, you should first understand how your body handles glucose, the sugar that fuels your metabolism. After you eat, your digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates into simple sugars that are small enough to be absorbed into your bloodstream. Glucose is far and away the most important of these sugars, and it's an indispensable source of energy for your body's cells. But to provide that energy, it must travel from your blood into your cells. Insulin is the hormone that unlocks the door to your cells. When your blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the beta cells of your pancreas spring into action, pouring insulin into your blood. If you produce enough insulin and your cells respond normally, your blood sugar level drops as glucose enters the cells, where it is burned for energy or stored for future use in your liver as glycogen. Insulin also helps your body turn amino acids into proteins and fatty acids into body fat. The net effect is to allow your body to turn food into energy and to store excess energy to keep your engine running if fuel becomes scarce in the future. A diabetes primer Diabetes is a single name for a group of disorders. All forms of the disease develop when the pancreas is unable to Continue reading >>

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