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2012 Apho Diabetes Prevalence Model

Diabetes: Facts And Stats

Diabetes: Facts And Stats

CONTENTS PART 1: PREVALENCE OF DIABETES 03 Globally UK Diagnosed Undiagnosed Prevalence 04 Type 1 and Type 2 Children with diabetes PART 2: WHO IS AT RISK OF DIABETES? 06 Genes Ethnicity 07 Obesity Deprivation Gestational diabetes PART 3: THE IMPACT OF DIABETES 10 Cardiovascular disease 11 Kidney disease Eye disease 12 Amputation Depression Neuropathy 13 Sexual dysfunction Complications in pregnancy Dementia 14 Life expectancy and mortality Financial costs PART 4: DIABETES CARE 16 Diabetes care PART 5: REFERENCES 18 References DIABETES: FACTS AND STATS 01 CONTENTS FURTHER HELP If you need any more help with your communications or have a question about anything in this document, contact the Clinical team. OF DIABETES PREVALENCE PART ONE DIABETES: FACTS AND STATS 03 PART ONE: HOW COMMON IS DIABETES? GLOBALLY The estimated diabetes prevalence for adults between the ages of 20 and 79 worldwide for 2014 was 387 million and it is expected to affect 592 million people by 2035. It is estimated that 179 million people have undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated that in 2013 five countries had more than 10 million people with diabetes: China, India, the United States of America, Brazil, the Russian Federation. The IDF also reported that in 2013 the ten countries with the highest diabetes prevalence in the adult population were Tokelau (37.5%), Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Cook Islands, Vanuatu, Saudi Arabia, Nauru, Kuwait and Qatar (22.9%). Diabetes affects people in both urban and rural settings worldwide, with 64% of cases in urban areas and 36% in rural1. UK It is estimated that more than one in 16 people in the UK has diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed)2. There are 3.9 million people living with diabetes in the UK. DIAG Continue reading >>

Clinical Review: Type 2 Diabetes

Clinical Review: Type 2 Diabetes

By Professor Iskandar Idris on the 9 June 2017 The diagnosis and management of type 2 diabetes, including criteria for diagnosing diabetes mellitus in patients with and without symptoms, screening and developing a structured care plan. It is estimated that 3.6m people have been diagnosed with diabetes in the UK.1However, using QOF figures with estimates from the Diabetes Prevalence Model 2016 (Public Health England) and 2012 APHO Diabetes Prevalence Model, there are an estimated 4.5 million people with diabetes in the UK. This includes 1 million people with type 2 diabetes who do not know they have it because they have not been diagnosed. This overall figure is projected to reach 5m by 2025. DH data shows that 90% of adults with diabetes in the UK have type 2 diabetes. Current estimates suggest the NHS already spends about 10% of its budget on diabetes (~21bn) and this is expected to rise to 35.6bn in 2035, driven by rising trends in diabetes-specific expenditure associated with treatment costs and acute hospital care.2 Studies in the UK and the US have reported that the age of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes traditionally diagnosed more commonly in older individuals has also decreased over time.3 As such, we are seeing more and more patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes before the age of 40 years. Its prevalence among children in the UK is also rising. Globally, the five countries with the largest numbers of people with diabetes are China, India, the US, Russia and Brazil, according to International Diabetes Federation estimates.4The highest prevalence of diabetes however are seen in Mauritius, countries situated in the western pacific islands and in the middle East. Type 2 diabetes is a heterogeneous disorder caused by a combination of environmental and genetic factor Continue reading >>

 References Ian Smith Consulting

References Ian Smith Consulting

The health system in the United Kingdom is mostly delivered by the National Health Service (NHS) and social care mostly by local authorities. In this pamphlet we collectively refer to the two systems as the care system. The Kings Fund (2014) A New Settlement for Health and Social Care interim report tinyurl.com/newsettlement Fernandez, J-L., Snell T., Wistow, G. (2013) Changes in the Patterns of Social Care Provision in England: 2005/6 to 2012/13. tinyurl.com/socialcareprovision Georghiou, T. and Bardsley, M. (2014) Exploring the Cost of Care at the End of Life. tinyurl.com/costeolc Knight Frank (2013) 2013 Care Homes Trading Performance Review. tinyurl.com/carehomesreview Health Select Committee (2013) Public Expenditure on Health and Care Services: Eleventh Report of Session 2012-13 Volume I. tinyurl.com/hscexpenditure Data cited in: Longevity Science Advisory Panel (2012) Life Expectancy past and future variations by socio-economic group in England & Wales tinyurl.com/1948lifeexpectancystats Office for National Statistics (2014) Life Expectancy at Birth and at Age 65 by Local Areas in England and Wales, 2011-13 tinyurl.com/2015lifeexpectancy Forder, J. and Fernandez, J-L. (2012) Analysing the Costs and Benefits of Social Care Funding Arrangements in England: technical report tinyurl.com/socialcarefunding Cited in Nolte, E., Knai, C., McKee, M. (2008) Managing chronic conditions: Experience in eight countries tinyurl.com/whochronic Age UK (2015) Later Life in the United Kingdom tinyurl.com/dementiastats Department of Health (2011) Healthy Lives, Healthy People: a call to action on obesity in England tinyurl.com/govobesity-stats The Information Centre for Health and Social Care (2012) Quality and Outcomes Framework, Achievement, Prevalence and Exceptions Data 2011/12. Continue reading >>

Insulin Controlled Diabetes Can I Get Life Insurance?

Insulin Controlled Diabetes Can I Get Life Insurance?

By clicking Send you give us permission to call you back to discuss your enquiry. You are also giving permission to email you any information relevant to your enquiry. We will not share your contact details outside of Future Proof for marketing purposes, and you can unsubscribe at any time. We were approached by Mr E, a 67 year old non-smoker. He required life insurance to provide financial security for his wife should he pass away. We discussed his outgoings and income and agreed that a level term policy with a sum assured of 35,000 over a 15 year term would meet his expectations. Mr E had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes when he was 48 years of age and has been prescribed Metformin and preventative medication to control blood pressure and cholesterol . In more recent years, he has also been prescribed insulin to help keep the diabetes under control. Until recently, nearly every Insurance Provider would have asked for medical records from the applicants GP once diabetes had been disclosed. As diabetes is more wide spread and the long term effects better understood these days, the insurance underwriting is evolving. A number of insurance companies will now offer immediate cover once an application has been submitted, providing the applicant can provide the latest HbA1c reading. At least two insurance providers offer an insurance policy specific to diabetes. The premium for these policies can actually reduce if the the policyholders control of the condition improves during the term of the policy. We explained to Mr E that a level term policy with a sum assured of 35,000 over a 15 year term is quoted around 35.00 a month. All of the insurance providers advised that they would increase the premium by between 75% and 100% due to his medical history. This would mean an a Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Cases And Costs Predicted To Rise

Diabetes: Cases And Costs Predicted To Rise

The newspaper said that most spending on the condition is due to avoidable complications. Several other newspapers featured similar claims, saying that by 2035 a sixth of NHS funding will be spent on the disease. These bold claims are based on a UK study which reported that the annual NHS cost of the direct treatment of diabetes in the UK will increase from £9.8 billion to £16.9 billion over the next 25 years. The predicted rise would equate to the NHS spending 17% of its entire budget on the condition, up from about 10% today. The study also reported that the cost of treating diabetes complications (including kidney failure, nerve damage, stroke, blindness and amputation) is expected to almost double from £7.7 billion currently to £13.5 billion by 2035/36. These projections are estimates based on current data. While this doesn’t mean they are unreliable or unrealistic, predicting future trends involves a lot of uncertainty and assumptions, and many things can change by 2035. The study does highlight the major challenges many nations face in preventing and treating diabetes and the need to address the disease through measures such as improved education, diagnosis and management. The newspaper headlines that suggest the costs of diabetes treatment will ‘bankrupt’ the NHS are misleading as this is not likely to happen. The study did not look at the wider spending of the NHS in detail. However, it is clear that diabetes is a major condition in the UK, and there is a need to examine the financial, personal and societal impacts of the condition to prevent people being needlessly affected by it and its complications. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the York Health Economic Consortium and was funded by Sanofi, a healthcare Continue reading >>

The Association Of Public Health Observatories (apho) Diabetes Prevalence Model: Estimates Of Total Diabetes Prevalence For England, 2010-2030.

The Association Of Public Health Observatories (apho) Diabetes Prevalence Model: Estimates Of Total Diabetes Prevalence For England, 2010-2030.

The Association of Public Health Observatories (APHO) Diabetes Prevalence Model: estimates of total diabetes prevalence for England, 2010-2030. Diabetes Health Intelligence, Yorkshire and Humber Public Health Observatory, University of York, Heslington, York, UK. [email protected] Diabet Med. 2011 May;28(5):575-82. doi: 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2010.03216.x. AIM: To provide robust estimates of the total prevalence of diabetes (including undiagnosed) in England to support effective planning and delivery of services. METHODS: Age- and sex-specific prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes in people aged 16 years and older [based on HbA(1c) of 6.5% (48 mmol/mol) or greater] were taken from the Health Survey for England 2006. Data from the Health Survey for England 2004 were used to adjust for ethnic difference in prevalence. A deprivation adjustment refined the geographical distribution of diabetes prevalence. Projected diabetes prevalence was calculated using trends in overweight and obesity prevalence from the Health Surveys for England 2003 to 2008. RESULTS: In 2010 there were an estimated 3.1 million (7.4%) people aged 16 years and older with diabetes in England. Comparisons between the 2008/2009 Quality and Outcomes Framework data and estimates for 2009 suggest that that 27.1% of the total number of people with diabetes are not included on general practice diabetes registers. The total number of adults with diabetes is projected to rise to 4.6 million or 9.5% by 2030. Approximately half of this increase is attributable to the changing age and ethnic group structure of the population and half is because of the rising prevalence of obesity. CONCLUSIONS: This model estimates that the prevalence of total diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed) in England is higher than pre Continue reading >>

Apho Diabetes Prevalence Model - Aol Search Results

Apho Diabetes Prevalence Model - Aol Search Results

APHO Diabetes Prevalence Model - Diabetes UK, UK Diabetes ... www.diabetes.co.uk/.../apho-diabetes-prevalence-model.html APHO Diabetes Prevalence Model. March 21, 2011. These series of models covers the prevalence of diabetes in England, Scotland and Wales. They estimate the total (diagnosed and undiagnosed) diabetes prevalence for people aged 16 years and older for 2009, 2010, 2015, 2020, 2025 and 2030. Read more APHO Diabetes Prevalence Model: Key Findings for England www.diabetes.co.uk/.../apho-diabetes-prevelance-model.html APHO Diabetes Prevalence Model: Key Findings for England was published in June 2010 by Diabetes Health Intelligence (Yorkshire and Humber Public Health Observatory). Diabetes Prevalence 2016 (November 2016) | Diabetes UK www.diabetes.org.uk/.../Statistics/Diabetes-prevalence-2016 Using QOF figures with estimates from the Diabetes Prevalence Model 2016 (Public Health England) and 2012 APHO Diabetes Prevalence Model, there are an estimated 4.5 million people with diabetes in the UK. This includes 1 million people with Type 2 diabetes who dont know they have it because they havent been diagnosed. Diabetes prevalence estimates for local populations - GOV.UK www.gov.uk/government/publications/diabetes-prevalence... Diabetes prevalence estimates for local populations ... The diabetes prevalence model does not make a ... summary analysis of estimates of diabetes prevalence ... The Association of Public Health Observatories (APHO ... onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1464-5491.2010.03216.x/abstract Methods Age- and sex-specific prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes in people aged 16 years and older [based on HbA 1c of 6.5% (48 mmol/mol) or greater] were taken from the Health Survey for England 2006. The Association of Public Health Observ Continue reading >>

Payingtoomuch.com Blog - Get A 40% Discount On Life Insurance For Diabetics

Payingtoomuch.com Blog - Get A 40% Discount On Life Insurance For Diabetics

Get a 40% Discount on Life Insurance for Diabetics PayingTooMuch.com can now offer Life Insurance rates with up to a 40% discount for diabetics, with an underwriting decision in less than an hour! Royal London has launched its long-awaited life insurance for people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, and PayingTooMuch.com is delighted to be one of just a small number of companies that have been chosen to offer this revolutionary product before it is rolled out nationally. The policy has the flexibility to reduce premiums by up to 40% depending on how well you are managing your diabetes, by sharing your HbA1c test results on an annual basis. If you provide annual results which show the diabetes has improved, the premium could be reduced. Premiums are guaranteed never to rise higher than the starting premium. We will ask some initial qualifying questions to assess whether Royal London can offer cover, then some additional questions will be asked about the diabetes and any other conditions before giving an automatic decision. If youre happy to proceed with the premium offered, you will simply be asked to produce evidence of your HbA1c within three months of the application being completed. Using a real time robo-underwriting process it is now possible to get cover within as little as an hour, rather than the traditional underwriting process which can take up to several weeks to complete. The cover will commence immediately at the price quoted but in certain cases, the insurer will need to then ask for further medical evidence. If they do find further complications however, you will have the option to reduce the sum assured rather than increasing the premium. Controlling diabetes can be difficult because changes need to be made to your lifestyle including a healthy diet, givin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence Estimates For Local Populations

Diabetes Prevalence Estimates For Local Populations

Healthcare professionals can use the estimates to understand: the estimated total number of people in their area with diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed) the estimated proportion of people in their area that have been diagnosed with diabetes This can help with planning services that address rising levels of diabetes and tracking progress towards closing the gap between diagnoses and the total number of cases. The estimates take into account the age, sex, and ethnic group distribution, and deprivation of the area. The diabetes prevalence model does not make a distinction between the types of diabetes. The estimates use data from the Health Survey for England (2012, 2013 and 2014), which looks at the changes in health and lifestyles across the country. Population data are from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) and GP registered populations. The documents that accompany the estimates include: estimates by CCG tool for the impact of obesity on diabetes summary analysis of estimates of diabetes prevalence across England technical document explaining how the estimates are created Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Cases And Costs Predicted To Rise

Diabetes: Cases And Costs Predicted To Rise

“Diabetes could ‘bankrupt’ the NHS in 20 years,” the Daily Mail has reported. The newspaper said that most spending on the condition is due to avoidable complications. Several other newspapers featured similar claims, saying that by 2035 a sixth of NHS funding will be spent on the disease. These bold claims are based on a UK study which reported that the annual NHS cost of the direct treatment of diabetes in the UK will increase from £9.8 billion to £16.9 billion over the next 25 years. The predicted rise would equate to the NHS spending 17% of its entire budget on the condition, up from about 10% today. The study also reported that the cost of treating diabetes complications (including kidney failure, nerve damage, stroke, blindness and amputation) is expected to almost double from £7.7 billion currently to £13.5 billion by 2035/36. These projections are estimates based on current data. While this doesn't mean they are unreliable or unrealistic, predicting future trends involves a lot of uncertainty and assumptions, and many things can change by 2035. The study does highlight the major challenges many nations face in preventing and treating diabetes and the need to address the disease through measures such as improved education, diagnosis and management. The newspaper headlines that suggest the costs of diabetes treatment will ‘bankrupt’ the NHS are misleading as this is not likely to happen. The study did not look at the wider spending of the NHS in detail. However, it is clear that diabetes is a major condition in the UK, and there is a need to examine the financial, personal and societal impacts of the condition to prevent people being needlessly affected by it and its complications. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researc Continue reading >>

Prof Elizabeth Goyder Publications - Publications - Profiles - Staff - Public Health - Sections - Scharr - The University Of Sheffield

Prof Elizabeth Goyder Publications - Publications - Profiles - Staff - Public Health - Sections - Scharr - The University Of Sheffield

Abouammoh NA, Barnes S & Goyder E (2016) Providing lifestyle advice to people with type 2 diabetes from different cultures: A qualitative investigation. Homer CV, Tod AM, Thompson AR, Allmark P & Goyder E (2016) Expectations and patients experiences of obesity prior to bariatric surgery: a qualitative study . Baxter S, Johnson M, Payne N, Buckley-Woods H, Blank L, Hock E, Daley A, Taylor A, Pavey T, Mountain G & Goyder E (2016) Promoting and maintaining physical activity in the transition to retirement: a systematic review of interventions for adults around retirement age . International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Baxter SK, Blank L, Woods HB, Payne N, Rimmer M & Goyder E (2014) Using logic model methods in systematic review synthesis: describing complex pathways in referral management interventions. . Goyder E, Hind D, Breckon J, Dimairo M, Minton J, Everson-Hock E, Read S, Copeland R, Crank H, Horspool K, Humphreys L, Hutchison A, Kesterton S, Latimer N, Scott E, Swaile P, Walters SJ, Wood R, Collins K & Cooper C (2014) A randomised controlled trial and cost-effectiveness evaluation of 'booster' interventions to sustain increases in physical activity in middle-aged adults in deprived urban neighbourhoods . Tunnicliff SA, Piercy H, Bowman CA, Hughes C & Goyder EC (2013) The contribution of the HIV specialist nurse to HIV care: a scoping review. . Goyder EC, Strong M, Green A, Holmes MW, Miles G, Reddington O, Lawson R, Lee A & Basran G (2013) Is a large scale community programme as effective as a community rehabilitation programme delivered in the setting of a clinical trial? . Lee ACK, Blank L, Payne N, McShane M & Goyder E (2013) Demand management: misguided solutions? . Booth A, Norman P, Harris P, Goyder E & Campbell M (2013) Using the t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Central Bedfordshire Jsna

Diabetes Mellitus - Central Bedfordshire Jsna

In Bedford Hospital, 110 and in Lutonand Dunstable Hospital (L and D) 121 Children and Young People (CYP) were using the diabetic services in 2013/14. In Central Bedfordshire the prevalence of diagnosed adult diabetes aged 17 years and older was 5.9% (13,188, 2014) which is statistically lower than Bedfordshire CCG (6.2%), see Figure 1. This could either be an accurate reflection of the levels of diabetes in Central Bedfordshire or poor case finding. Figure 1 Prevalence for diabetes mellitus aged 17 or over, 2013/14 Source: QOF , 2013/14 In Bedfordshire CCG about 90% of people have Type 2 diabetes and 10% have Type 1. Prevalence of diabetes overall is higher in people aged over 60. Child obesity is a recognised risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes as an adult. For 2013/14 National Child Measurement Programme, Central Bedfordshire had lower levels of obesity in Year 6 pupils (15.9%) compared to England (19.1%) which is not significantly different. However, pockets within Central Bedfordshire are higher than the England average. Projected future position if no action taken In 2012, the diabetes prevalence model estimated the total proportion (diagnosed and undiagnosed) of people with diabetes in Central Bedfordshire was thought to be 6.5%. Estimates are adjusted for the age, sex, ethnic group and deprivation pattern of the local population. This suggested that there are approximately 2,200 undiagnosed people in Central Bedfordshire. If current trends in the size of population and levels of obesity continue the total prevalence of diabetes is expected to rise to 7.3% by 2020 and 8.3% by 2030, see Figure 2. Figure 2 A prediction of the estimated total (diagnosed and undiagnosed) diabetes prevalence in adults, 2012-2030 Source: QOF 2009_2010 and APHO prevalence model Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence In Sweden At Present And Projections For Year 2050

Diabetes Prevalence In Sweden At Present And Projections For Year 2050

Abstract Data on the future diabetes burden in Scandinavia is limited. Our aim was to project the future burden of diabetes in Sweden by modelling data on incidence, prevalence, mortality, and demographic factors. To project the future burden of diabetes we used information on the prevalence of diabetes from the national drug prescription registry (adults ≥20 years), previously published data on relative mortality in people with diabetes, and population demographics and projections from Statistics Sweden. Alternative scenarios were created based on different assumptions regarding the future incidence of diabetes. Between 2007 and 2013 the prevalence of diabetes rose from 5.8 to 6.8% in Sweden but incidence remained constant at 4.4 per 1000 (2013). With constant incidence and continued improvement in relative survival, prevalence will increase to 10.4% by year 2050 and the number of afflicted individuals will increase to 940 000. Of this rise, 30% is accounted for by changes in the age structure of the population and 14% by improved relative survival in people with diabetes. A hypothesized 1% annual rise in incidence will result in a prevalence of 12.6% and 1 136 000 cases. Even with decreasing incidence at 1% per year, prevalence of diabetes will continue to increase. We can expect diabetes prevalence to rise substantially in Sweden over the next 35 years as a result of demographic changes and improved survival among people with diabetes. A dramatic reduction in incidence is required to prevent this development. Figures Citation: Andersson T, Ahlbom A, Carlsson S (2015) Diabetes Prevalence in Sweden at Present and Projections for Year 2050. PLoS ONE 10(11): e0143084. Editor: Andrea Icks, Heinrich-Heine University, Faculty of Medicine, GERMANY Received: March 11, 2015; Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Bathnes

Diabetes | Bathnes

There are 7,460 (2012/13 financial year) people 17 years and over registered with diabetes mellitus in GP practises in Bath and North East Somerset The prevalence rate in B&NES is significantly lower than the South West and England This prevalence is expected to increase by approximately 150-200 per year, or approximately 34% from 2005 to 2025. Diabetes is a lifelong condition thatcauses a person's blood sugar level to become too high. It is also known as diabetes mellitus. The amount of sugar in the blood is usually controlled by the hormone insulin, which is produced by the pancreas. Those with diabetes are unable to break down glucose into energy because there is either not enough insulin to move the glucose, or the insulin produced does not work properly. The main symptoms of diabetes are: feeling verythirsty, urinating frequently, particularly at night, feeling very tired, weight loss and loss of muscle bulk. The two main types of diabetes are: type 1 andtype 2.In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin. As no insulin is produced, your glucose levels increase, which canseriously damage the body's organs. Type 1 diabetes is often knownas insulin-dependent diabetes or asjuvenile diabetes or early-onset diabetes because it usually develops before the age of 40, often during teenage years. Type 2 diabetes is where the body does not produce enoughinsulin, or the body's cells do not react to insulin. This is known asinsulin resistance.Type 2 diabetesis often associated withobesity. Obesity-related diabetes is sometimes referred to as maturity-onset diabetes because it is more common in older people. During pregnancy, some women have such high levels of blood glucose their body is unable toproduce enough insulin to ab Continue reading >>

Yhpho - Mortality Among Inpatients With Diabetes

Yhpho - Mortality Among Inpatients With Diabetes

YHPHO has become part of Public Health England , joining its Knowledge and Intelligence Team (Northern and Yorkshire). For access to over 100 data and analytical tools from across Public Health England, please visit the PHE Data and knowledge gateway At the request of Dr Rowan Hillson MBE, former National Clinical Director for Diabetes, an analysis of mortality among inpatients with diabetes has been conducted. The study used data on over 10 million hospital admissions between April 2010 and March 2012 to assess case-mix and risk factors for inpatient mortality and identify trust level variation in the risk of an inpatient with diabetes dying. Key finding: After adjustment for case-mix, inpatients with diabetes are 6.4% more likely to die than those without diabetes. This study shows that people with diabetes are significantly more likely to die in hospital than those without the condition. There are multiple potential reasons for this, including the fact that diabetes can cause dangerous complications. It is possible that some of these deaths could have been prevented. I ask every hospital to review their own data to see if lessons could be learned in their own hospital to save lives in the future.Dr Rowan Hillson, National Clinical Director for Diabetes Continue reading >>

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