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155 Glucose Level During Pregnancy

Different Stories About The 1 Hr Glucose Test

Different Stories About The 1 Hr Glucose Test

Different stories about the 1 hr glucose test Okay, I have to post because I am hearing a lot of different stories about everyone's 1 hour glucose test, and I want to see if my doctor is unusual. I have my glucose test tomorrow morning. I was told to fast starting at midnight- that is, no food or drink (except water) for over eight hours. This is my second pregnancy; I had gestational diabetes with my first one. My doctor "believes" that if you fail the one hour test, you probably have gestational diabetes, so he "recommends" not taking the three hour test. I scored a 153 on the one hour test last time, which is obviously "failing" but not as bad as it could have been. I have two friends who scored a 160 and a 198 respectively and still passed the three hour test. What I want to know is, why am I reading so many people who say that their doctors don't make them fast before the one hour test when mine does make us fast, and does anyone else have a doctor that diagnoses you with gestational diabetes if you just fail the first one-hour test? I didn't have to fast prior. I ate a bagel w/ peanut butter. Then drank my drink. I was not allowed to eat or drink anything once I started the drink. (water is fine) if I had failed the 1hr. I would have had to do the 3hr. @newmommy1971 I'm taking my test next week and the doctor told me to fast for 8 hours too. But I get morning sickness still and sick any time of day if I have sugar on an empty stomach. I'm thinking I will still eat a light breakfast a couple of hours before I go or I can guarantee I'll throw it up. Many of my friends doctors didn't make them fast for the first one so I don't see why I have to. @newmommy1971 I was told not to fast, but I failed the test. This is my second pregnancy & with my first I passed. I have Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Causes Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is one of the most common pregnancy complications, and it affects between 2 to 10 percent of all pregnancies. This condition is characterized by high blood sugar that starts ( or is first diagnosed) during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes typically goes away after your baby is born. However, over 50 percent of women who experience gestational diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes later in life. To understand how gestational diabetes develops, you have to understand a few basic principles of how your endocrine system works. When you eat, most of your food breaks down into a type of sugar called glucose, which enters your bloodstream. Insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas) opens your cells so they can use glucose as energy. When you're pregnant, the hormones produced by the placenta inhibits the effects of insulin. As a result, your cells aren't able to respond to insulin as well as they did previously. To compensate for this resistance to insulin, a healthy woman's pancreas will respond by secreting more insulin. You may actually require three times the normal amount of insulin to support a healthy pregnancy. Gestational diabetes occurs when your pancreas can't keep up with the increased insulin demand. When you don't have enough insulin, blood glucose can't leave your bloodstream and be changed into energy. As a result, glucose rises to high levels in your blood – which causes gestational diabetes. Untreated Gestational Diabetes and Your Baby Gestational diabetes usually doesn't begin until the middle half of pregnancy – often around 20 to 24 weeks pregnant. At this stage of pregnancy, your baby's body has already been formed. Because of this fact, gestational diabetes doesn't cause the type of birth defect Continue reading >>

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

I just read Catherine’s piece about a series of pump and insulin failures (It’s great! Read it!), and I had to shake my head in that oh-I-so-feel-you way. I’m going on nearly two decades as a diabetic now, but Friday night was a first for me, and one of the worst blood sugar nights I have ever had. I had been trending insulin resistant for a few days — requiring on average about 22 units of insulin per day rather than the standard 14 or 15. This was not too surprising, as — well, I suppose I meant to write a piece announcing this, but it hasn’t happened yet, so here goes nothing– I’m pregnant, and the hormonal ups and downs lead to periodic changes in insulin requirements. Still, heading into Friday night, my insulin behaved like water, and I was just pumping it in with relatively little return on investment. By the evening, I had used some 25 units for the day. Now, being pregnant, hyperglycemia is my bogeyman. Hyperglycemia is bad bad bad. And not just standard, over 200 hyperglycemia. I now begin to panic when I hit 130 mg/dL. So before bed, when I began to climb to 120, 130, I bolused excessively and walked in circles, trying to bring myself back down. I stayed up for an extra hour, waiting, walking, bolusing. Finally I was closer to 100 mg/dL, and went to bed, annoyed to have had to stay awake longer than desired. To my chagrin, not an hour later, my CGM woke me up with its buzzing: HIGH. I cursed, got out of bed, measured myself. 139 mg/dL. Damn you, diabetes. Under normal, non-pregnant circumstances, I would bolus and go back to bed. Now, the risk of going up is too high, and I want to make sure I go down first. I left the bedroom, and proceeded to walk and bolus and wait and walk and bolus and wait and watch lame Netflix movies. Cursing diabetes Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening And Tolerance Tests During Pregnancy

Glucose Screening And Tolerance Tests During Pregnancy

Glucose screening and tolerance tests during pregnancy Glucose screening and tolerance tests during pregnancy A glucose screening test is a routine test during pregnancy that checks a pregnant woman?s blood glucose (sugar) level. A glucose tolerance test is done if a glucose screening test result is higher than normal. It is used to diagnose Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar ( ) that starts or is found during pregnancy. Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy (OGTT); Glucose challenge test - pregnancy You do not need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose. Your blood will be drawn 1 hour after you drink the glucose solution to check your blood glucose level. If your blood glucose is too high, you will need to come back for a glucose tolerance test. For this test: Do not eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 - 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose. You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again every 30 - 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Eat your normal foods in the days before your test. Ask your health care provider if any of the medicines you take can affect your test results. Most women do not have side effects from the glucose tolerance test. Some may feel nauseated, sweaty, or light-headed after they drink the glucose solution. Serious side effects from this test are very uncommon. Most pregnant women have a glucose screening test between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. This test checks for . The test may be done earlier if you have high glucose levels in your urine during your routine prenatal visits or if you have a high risk f Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Tests

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Tests

Why do I need a glucose screening test during pregnancy? Most healthcare practitioners routinely recommend a glucose screening test (also called a glucose challenge test or GCT) between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy to check for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a high blood sugar condition that some women get during pregnancy. Between 2 and 5 percent of expectant mothers develop this condition, making it one of the most common health problems during pregnancy. And because the condition rarely causes any symptoms, testing is the only way to find out whether you have it. Like any screening test, the GCT won't give you a diagnosis. Instead, it's designed to identify as many women as possible who may have a problem and need more testing to find out. So a positive result doesn't mean that you have gestational diabetes. In fact, only about a third of women who test positive on the glucose screen actually have the condition. If you test positive on the screening, you'll need to take the glucose tolerance test (GTT) – a longer, more definitive test that tells you for sure whether you have gestational diabetes. Your practitioner may want you to be screened earlier than 24 weeks if a routine urine test shows a lot of sugar in your urine or if you're considered high risk. If the results are normal, you'll be screened again at 24 to 28 weeks. Of course, if you were diagnosed with diabetes before pregnancy, you won't need to be screened. Instead, you'll continue to work with your practitioner to manage your condition during pregnancy. How is the glucose screening test done? When you arrive for the test, you're given a sugar solution that contains 50 grams of glucose. The stuff tastes like a very sweet soda pop (it comes in cola, orange, or lime flavor), and you have to Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

During pregnancy, some women develop high blood sugar levels. This condition is known as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). GDM typically develops between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it’s estimated to occur in up to 9.2 percent of pregnancies. If you develop GDM while you’re pregnant, it doesn’t mean that you had diabetes before your pregnancy or will have it afterward. But GDM does raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. If poorly managed, it can also raise your child’s risk of developing diabetes and add other risk factors to you and your baby during pregnancy and delivery. It’s rare for GDM to cause symptoms. If you do experience symptoms, they will likely be mild. They may include: fatigue blurred vision excessive thirst excessive need to urinate The exact cause of GDM is unknown, but hormones likely play a role. When you’re pregnant, your body produces larger amounts of some hormones, including: human placental lactogen estrogen hormones that increase insulin resistance These hormones affect your placenta and help sustain your pregnancy. Over time, the amount of these hormones in your body increases. They may interfere with the action of insulin, the hormone that regulates your blood sugar. Insulin helps move glucose out of your blood into cells, where it’s used for energy. If you don’t have enough insulin, or you have high levels of hormones that prevent insulin from working properly, your blood glucose levels may rise. This can cause GDM. You’re at higher risk of developing GDM if you: are over the age of 25 have high blood pressure have a family history of diabetes were overweight before you became pregnant have previously given birth to a baby weighin Continue reading >>

Tag Archives: Normal Blood Sugar During Pregnancy

Tag Archives: Normal Blood Sugar During Pregnancy

Ever heard of gestational diabetes? It’s when a when a woman develops diabetes during pregnancy. It usually goes away soon after the baby is born. All pregnancies are characterized by some degree of insulin resistance and high insulin levels: they are necessary for the baby. Nevertheless, healthy pregnant women run blood sugars 20% lower than when they are not pregnant. In the U.S., gestational diabetes occurs in 5% of pregnancies, affecting more than 240,000 births annually. Compared to caucasians, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) occurs more often in blacks, native Americans, Asians, and Latinos. So What’s the Big Deal? Numerous problems are associated with GDM, for both the mother and the baby: dangerously high blood pressure (preeclampsia) excessive amount of amniotic fluid (the baby in the uterus floats in this fluid) delivery requiring an operation early or premature delivery death of the baby birth trauma, such as broken bones or nerve injury metabolic problems in the baby (low blood sugar, for example) abnormally large baby (macrosomia, a major problem) Diabetic ketoacidosis—a life-threatening complication of diabetes—is rare in GDM. How Is GDM Diagnosed? (section updated December 28, 2013) Most women should undergo a screening test around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. Screen earlier if undiagnosed type 2 diabetes is suspected or if risk factors for diabetes are present. The American Diabetes Association (2014 guidelines) recommends either one of two screening tests. “One-step test.” It’s a morning oral glucose tolerance test after at least eight hours of fasting. Fasting blood sugar is tested then he woman drinks 75 grams oral of glucose. Blood sugar is tested again one and two hours later. This blood sample is obtained by a needle in a v Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy: Twice As Important

Diabetes And Pregnancy: Twice As Important

Pregnancy is a wondrous and exciting time. It’s a time of change, both physically and emotionally. With the proper attention and prenatal medical care, most women with diabetes can enjoy their pregnancies and welcome a healthy baby into their lives. Why Tight Blood Sugar Control Is Critically Important Blood sugar control is important from the first week of pregnancy all the way until delivery. Organogenesis takes place in the first trimester. Uncontrolled blood sugar during the early weeks of pregnancy increases the risk of miscarriage, and birth defects. (Women don’t develop gestational diabetes until later in pregnancy, which means they don’t share these early pregnancy risks.) Later in the pregnancy, uncontrolled blood sugar levels can cause fetal macrosomia, which may lead to shoulder dystocia, fractures, and the need for Cesarean section deliveries. Very high blood sugar levels can increase the risk of stillbirth. Maternal hyperglycemia can stimulate fetal hyperinsulinemia, and lead to neonatal hypoglycemia when the glucose supply (umbilical cord) is cut. Because of all these increased risks, home deliveries are not typically recommended for women with any form of diabetes. As many as two thirds of all women with diabetes have unplanned pregnancies and most women don’t realize that they’re pregnant until six or more weeks into the pregnancy. That’s why it’s critically important for women who have diabetes to use contraception and achieve tight blood sugar control prior to conception. Many health-care providers suggest at least three to six months of stable blood sugar control prior to attempting to conceive. Hemoglobin A1c should be within 1 percentage point above the lab normal, which means striving for a HbA1c of less than 7 percent. Women using or Continue reading >>

Glucose Test During Pregnancy For Gestational Diabetes

Glucose Test During Pregnancy For Gestational Diabetes

Congratulations! A baby is on the way. Your nine months will be filled with preparations, from decorating the nursery to stocking up on bibs and booties to going for regular checkups to ensure that you and your baby are as healthy as possible. One of the tests that you’ll have during this time is to check for gestational diabetes. A few weeks ago, we looked at Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes, which is growing more common among pregnant women, will be our focus this week. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes, or GDM for short, is diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. In fact, it only occurs during pregnancy. (Gestational diabetes is not the same as diabetes in women who have existing diabetes and become pregnant). Diabetes, as most of you know, is a condition in which blood glucose levels go too high. High blood glucose levels can be harmful to you and, in the case of pregnancy, to your unborn child. Fortunately, blood glucose, or sugar, levels can be controlled during pregnancy, and in most instances, high blood sugar levels return to normal after the baby is delivered. According to the National Institutes of Health, up to 10% of pregnant women in the United States have gestational diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? A lot of changes occur in the body during pregnancy, many of them occurring due to widely fluctuating hormone levels. The placenta, which is what connects the baby to the mother’s uterine lining, makes various hormones, and while this is a good thing, these hormones can sometimes make it hard for the body’s insulin to work properly (a condition called insulin resistance). As a result, blood sugar levels can start to climb in women who cannot produce enough insulin to deal with the insulin resistance. How do you Continue reading >>

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Diabetes that begins during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. This condition affects 5 to 9 percent of all pregnancies in the United States, and it is becoming more common, according to a July 2009 article in "American Family Physician." Pregnancy also aggravates preexisting type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Blood sugar levels that are consistently too high during pregnancy can cause problems for both mother and infant. Video of the Day Diabetes during pregnancy increases the likelihood of congenital malformations, or birth defects, in infants, particularly if your blood glucose is poorly controlled for the first 10 weeks of pregnancy. High blood sugars also contribute to excessive fetal growth, which makes labor and delivery difficult and increases the likelihood of infant fractures or nerve injuries. Large infants are more likely to be delivered via cesarean section. Newborns of diabetic mothers are at risk for respiratory distress, jaundice and dangerously low blood calcium or glucose levels. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugars exceed specified levels following two glucose tolerance tests. The first test, usually performed between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy, involves drinking 50 g of a sugar solution and checking your blood glucose one hour later. If your level is above 130 mg/dL, your doctor will probably order a second glucose tolerance test that measures your blood glucose when you are fasting and then each hour for 2 to 3 hours after the test. A fasting glucose higher than 95 mg/dL, a one-hour level above 180 mg/dL, a two-hour level over 155 mg/dL or a three-hour measurement over 140 mg/dL is diagnostic of gestational diabetes. For pregnant women without diabetes, average fasting glucose levels vary between 69 mg/dL and 75 mg/ Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Almost two million women of reproductive age have diabetes, and these numbers continue to rise, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is extremely important for women with diabetes to achieve normal blood glucose levels before they become pregnant, because if women have poorly controlled diabetes going into a pregnancy, they are at much higher risk for serious fetal complications. This improved control can be accomplished with education and medical management. Women with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes are also at higher risk for: Large birth weight babies, resulting in more Cesarean deliveries and increased complications during delivery Premature births or fetal death Pre-eclampsia: a dangerous surge in blood pressure associated with protein in the urine Diabetic retinopathy: damage to the retina caused by high glucose levels Diabetic kidney disease Severe hypoglycemia: episodes of low blood glucose levels that can result in confusion or unconsciousness Ensuring a healthy pregnancy The good news is that women with uncomplicated diabetes who keep their blood glucose levels in a normal range before and during pregnancy have about the same chance of having a successful pregnancy as women without diabetes. The Joslin-Beth Israel Deaconess Pregnancy Program recommends the following blood glucose goals and medical assessments before pregnancy: Fasting and pre-meal blood glucose: 80-110 mg/dl Blood glucose one hour after meal: 100-155 mg/dl A1C, a blood test that measures average blood glucose over two to three months: less than 7 percent and as close to 6% as possible without hypoglycemia Review of diabetes and obstetrical history Eye evaluations to screen for and discuss risks of diabetic retinopathy Renal, thyroid, gynecological and sometimes c Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy; OGTT - pregnancy; Glucose challenge test - pregnancy; Gestational diabetes - glucose screening A glucose screening test is a routine test during pregnancy that checks a pregnant woman's blood glucose (sugar) level. Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar (diabetes) that starts or is found during pregnancy. TWO-STEP TESTING During the first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose. Your blood will be drawn 1 hour after you drink the glucose solution to check your blood glucose level. If your blood glucose from the first step is too high, you will need to come back for a 3-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose, 100 grams (g) . You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 3 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 3 hours for this test. ONE-STEP TESTING You need to go to the lab one time for a 2-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose (75 g). You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 2 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 2 hours for this test. For either the two-step test or one-step test, eat your normal food in the days before your tes Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Screening In Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes And Screening In Pregnancy

When it comes to the 40 weeks spent carrying baby, the body goes through dramatic changes. Some of these changes are perfectly in sync with carrying and developing the fetus, other changes are harmful the baby and to mom’s body. One such change is the development of gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes carries the same symptoms and problems as other forms of diabetes not associated with pregnancy. The body loses the ability to handle food sugars and insulin development when pregnant. The onset of gestational diabetes can lead to hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and complications with fetal growth and birth. Glucose Screening and Mom At your first visit your doctor will find out if you are at risk for diabetes. If, for example, there is a family history then you will usually get tested foir diabetes right away. Without risks, then diabetes screening will often occur during the 26th to 28th week of gestation. This preliminary glucose screening, called the glucose challenge screening test, will involve mom drinking a special liquid full of glucose. After 1 hour, mom will have blood drawn and the levels of glucose in the blood will be recorded. Blood glucose levels will most often be the highest 1 hour after consuming a high sugar meal or drink. A level below 140 mg/dL is usually considered normal A level above 140 mg/dL is usually considered elevated Some doctors consider levels above 130-135 mg/dL elevated About 15-25% of pregnant women will have an elevated glucose level on the 1 hour glucose test. If this preliminary test is passed, the pregnant mom will be cleared of having any likelihood of gestational diabetes unless urine testing shows some sign of glucose in the urine farther into the pregnancy. If this preliminary test is failed, mom will have to undergo a 3-Ho Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels During

Blood Sugar Levels During

Pregnancy By Susan M. Callahan, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist Related Links: What Causes Spotting During Pregnancy-Top 10 RemediesNormal Fasting Blood SugarIdeal Breakfast for DiabeticsFoods That Lower Blood SugarBeat the Lows-Ideal Breakfasts for HypoglycemiaExercises That Lower Blood SugarIdeal Dinner for DiabeticsDirectory of Sugar Content in FoodsIdeal Diet for Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During PregnancyHigh Blood Pressure During Your Pregnancy?-10 Natural RemediesTired During Pregnancy?-Causes and Cures Ideal Breakfast for Heart Health Why Americans Read In Bathrooms-The Hidden Epidemic of Constipation Bowels -3 Keys to Normal Bowels Break Through Your Diet Plateau How Many Calories Do I Burn Fiber Rich Foods Quinoa-The New Superfood? Fish Oil Benefits-Let Me Count the Ways My Heart Attack-personal stories from survivors Fat-It's Alive! Foods That Reduce Your Blood Pressure Waist Size Matters Six Pack Abs Step by Step Americans Are Dangerously Sleep Deprived Uncontrolled blood sugar levels are dangerous to both your health and the health of your unborn baby. The risk is especially high in the first trimester, when your baby is developing rapidly. During this stage, abnormally high blood sugar levels increase the risk of miscarriage and birth defects. According to a 2009 study of 23,000 women from 9 countries led by Northwestern University and funded by the National Institutes of Health, sugar levels high enough to qualify as diabetic occurs in 5% of all pregnancies. Even slightly higher than normal blood sugar levels puts the mother at significantly higher risk for Ceasarean delivery, for preeclampsia, a potentially fatal disease, and for shoulder dystocia, a condition in which the baby's shoulder becomes in the mothers body, preventing natural Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Share: What is Gestational Diabetes? During pregnancy, hormonal changes may cause impaired glucose tolerance and higher insulin needs. If the pancreas in a pregnant woman cannot keep up with the insulin needs, the blood glucose levels will rise above desired levels. Higher than normal blood glucose levels are harmful to the woman and her fetus. About 1 in 15 women develop gestational diabetes when pregnant. How is it Diagnosed? Most women have an oral glucose tolerance test at week 24-28 in the pregnancy, the second trimester. A high blood glucose test earlier in the pregnancy would alert the doctor to investigate sooner. The glucose challenge screening test consists of consuming 50 of glucose and then testing blood sugars at the beginning and at one hour. The one hour blood glucose should be less than 140 mg/dL. If higher, a glucose tolerance test may be ordered. A glucose tolerance diagnostic test for gestational diabetes consists of drinking 100g of glucose and testing blood glucose fasting and every hour for 3 hours. The trends in the rise of blood glucose define the diagnosis. If two or more of these values are exceeded in the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), the diagnosis is positive. Fasting _> 95 mg/dl, 1 hour _>180 mg/dl, 2 hours _> 155 mg/dl, and 3 hours _> 140 mg/dl. What is the Concern? The developing baby is affected by the high blood sugars in utero. In early pregnancy, high blood sugars in the mother can cause birth defects and increased rate of miscarriages. During the second and third trimesters of the pregnancy, the mother can gain excessive weight, as well as the baby. A large baby is at increased risk during labor and delivery. The baby, which may have high blood glucose before birth, will have a severe drop in blood glucose at birth, and must be Continue reading >>

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