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13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Treating Type 1 Diabetes

Treating Type 1 Diabetes

en espaolEl tratamiento de la diabetes tipo 1 If your child or teen has been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes , the next step is to create a diabetes management plan to help him or her manage the condition and stay healthy and active. Treatment plans for type 1 diabetes are based on each child's needs and the suggestions of the diabetes health care team . Treatment approaches differ in, among other things, the types of insulin given and the schedules for giving insulin given each day. The advantages and disadvantages of a plan should be considered for each child. The blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood. Glucose is the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each cell through the bloodstream. The hormone insulin allows the glucose to get into the cells. In type 1 diabetes, the body can no longer make insulin, so the glucose can't get into the body's cells. This makes the blood glucose level rise. Treatment goals for kids with diabetes are to control the condition in a way that minimizes symptoms; prevents short- and long-term health problems; and helps them to have normal physical, mental, emotional, and social growth and development. To do this, parents and kids should aim for the goal of keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. In general, kids with type 1 diabetes need to: eat a healthy, balanced diet, paying special attention to the amount of carbohydrates in each meal and the diabetes meal plan check blood sugar levels several times a day Following the treatment plan helps kids stay healthy, but treating diabetes isn't the same as curing it. Right now, there's no cure for diabetes, so kids with type 1 diabetes will need treatment for the rest of their lives. But with proper care, they should look and feel h Continue reading >>

Care Of Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

Care Of Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

A statement of the American Diabetes Association ADA, American Diabetes Association AER, albumin excretion rate CVD, cardiovascular disease DCCT, Diabetes Control and Complications Trial DKA, diabetic ketoacidosis EDIC, Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications EMA, endomysial autoantibody MDI, multiple daily insulin injection NCEP, National Cholesterol Education Program NCEP-Peds, National Cholesterol Education Program for Pediatrics SMBG, self-monitoring of blood glucose tTG, tissue transglutaminase During recent years, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has published detailed guidelines and recommendations for the management of diabetes in the form of technical reviews, position statements, and consensus statements. Recommendations regarding children and adolescents have generally been included as only a minor portion of these documents. For example, the most recent ADA position statement on “Standards of Medical Care for Patients With Diabetes Mellitus” (last revised October 2003) included “special considerations” for children and adolescents (1). Other position statements included age-specific recommendations for screening for nephropathy (2) and retinopathy (3) in children with diabetes. In addition, the ADA has published guidelines pertaining to certain aspects of diabetes that apply exclusively to children and adolescents, including care of children with diabetes at school (4) and camp (5) and a consensus statement on type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents (6). The purpose of this document is to provide a single resource on current standards of care pertaining specifically to children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. It is not meant to be an exhaustive compendium on all aspects of the management of pediatric diabetes. Howeve Continue reading >>

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes | Diabetes And Teacher

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes | Diabetes And Teacher

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes 13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes - Type 1 diabetes is one of those diseases that teachers can often see signs of in the classroom, so its important to know what to look for. You need to live a precautionary lifestyle as a diabetic. You are to practice habits that onl What It's Like To Live With Type 1 Diabetes Type I diabetes is a very severe disease. The average life-span of a type 1 diabetic is years shorter than an average person. One of the most common diseases nowadays is type 2 diabetes and it has been estimated that one in every four American children and adults are suffering from this health condition. 9 Things a Mom of a Type 1 Diabetes Child Wont Tell You or Maybe She Would 9 Things a Mom of a Type 1 Diabetes Child Wont Tell You I like child DOES live a very normal life Teaching my child with type 1 diabetes to live with it and be healthy and confident will be my greatest accomplishment and give me peace. Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy. 12 Clever Teacher Sayings to Help Kids Mind Their Own Business Essay on donating books to public library include a public library link for books I write about; I also re-donate a portion of Brain Pickings donations to the New. The Big Diabetes Lie Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms - Doctors at the International Council for Truth in Medicine are revealing the truth about diabetes that has been suppressed for over 21 years. The 504 Plan for Students with Type 1 Diabetes Summary: This is a sample email to notify new teachers at the beginning of the sch Continue reading >>

What Is Type 1 Diabetes? A Family Activity For Fhe Or Family Home Evening

What Is Type 1 Diabetes? A Family Activity For Fhe Or Family Home Evening

What is Type 1 Diabetes? A Family Activity for FHE or Family Home Evening What is Type 1 Diabetes? A Family Activity for FHE or Family Home Evening I know a lot of you know that my dear friends, Josh and Jamie Terry, lost their 5 year old daughter Kycie a few years ago due to undiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes. This week, January 30th is the anniversary of when Kycie was life flighted to Primary Childrens Hospital. To celebrate her life, I wanted to help spread the word about her, her family, and the disease that took her life so suddenly. The misdiagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes is on the rise. It only takes knowledge of this disease to save lives and change the world. Please help us by teaching your families about it during your next family night activity. Here is an excerpt from a post I wrote in 2015, The Terry family lives in my neighborhood, and I remember the day that Kycie was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes like it was yesterday.that night, we found out that my knowledge on type 1 Diabetes was EXTREMELY wrong. Since that day, hundreds of kids have been diagnosed with T1D due to the awareness that Kycie and her parents have spread. So, to celebrate her anniversary in a proactive way, I put together a FREE family home evening packet for families anywhere. During this FHE lesson, we learn what Type 1 Diabetes warning signs are, discuss why T1D is misdiagnosed, and help spread awareness. If we can keep spreading the word, more and more kids will be saved! Opening Song: Gethsemane {click for music and words} Opening Prayer: {assign a member of your family} Video of Type 1 Diabetes from Terry Family Optional Activity: Test Familys Blood Sugar Levels before and after a Family Home Evening Treat to demonstrate how to test blood glucose levels. Closing Song: I know that my Savior L Continue reading >>

10 Things Your Teacher Should Know About Type One Diabetes - Danii Foundation

10 Things Your Teacher Should Know About Type One Diabetes - Danii Foundation

10 Things your teacher should know about type ONE diabetes 10 Things your teacher should know about type ONE diabetes 10 things teachers should know about having a student with type ONE diabetes When your student has type 1 diabetes, the body doesnt make the insulin needed to metabolise sugar into energy. People with type 1 must either give injections of insulin or wear an insulin pump to stay alive. Basic info: Food raises blood sugar. Exercise and activity lower blood sugar. It is hard to have diabetes, even when I have an insulin pump. My blood sugars will vary every day and there is no such thing as control with Type 1. Please be patient while I deal with low and high blood sugars. 2. I wear super cool gadgets that help keep me alive. My insulin pump and/or continuous glucose monitor may look like the latest iPod or mobile phone some alarms even sound like a ring tone. Please dont take them away from me you would be putting my health in danger. I need to keep glucose tabs and snacks in my desk (or pockets) in case of emergency. If go low, even a trip to the nurses office could be too risky without immediate fast acting sugar. 4. I may not be brave enough to speak up for myself I depend on you to put my health and well-being first. Its not always easy to speak up when Im low or high and need to take care of diabetes. It helps to know youre looking out for my best interests. 5. I need immediate attention when I tell you I feel low I may also need your help. Please give me a snack or let me check my blood sugar immediately. Dont leave me alone or send me to the nurses office by myself. My body and brain wont be functioning properly and I could make a wrong turn or collapse in the hallway. I also cannot finish a test or complete my work until I have treated my low. 6. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Advocacy...going To School

Diabetes Advocacy...going To School

Sending any child to school may often cause a parent great anxiety at leaving their little angel in the care of strangers for an extended period of time. This anxiety becomes ten-fold when sending a child with a chronic illness to school. No one can possibly care for our child like we do so how do you keep your child as safe as possible when you arent there? If you live in the USA, you ensure that you have a 504 Plan in place that outlines the quality of care and responsibilities legally required by the school. If you live in Canada the road is not as clear. In Canada, each board has a separate policy. If your board does not have a Diabetes Policy in place, approach them and ask that it be done. With the increased number of children being diagnosed with this disease, it is in their best interest to prepare specific policies relating to the care of students with this disease. Ask to have a say, investigate other policies and try to work out one that is mutually beneficial to all parties. Policy or not, 504 Plan or not, your child must still be educated and it is still the parents responsibility to do as much as they can to prepare the school to care for their child. Contact your school and ask for an in-service with all personnel who will be in contact with your child. Have your CDE or public health nurse attend to ensure that everyone is properly trained and aware of what is involved in having a child with Type 1 diabetes in their school. If your child is on an Insulin pump, you may wish to show the pump or have pictures of it made available so that everyone understands that it is a piece of medical equipment.You may also wish to go over some of the alarms so that staff are aware of what to do even if your child is either too young to understand or not able to communic Continue reading >>

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes 10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes Children will not outgrow type 1 diabetes: With type 1 diabetes, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin have been destroyed. People with type 1 diabetes will always have to take insulin injections (until there is a cure). Changes in lifestyle or diet will not improve type 1 diabetes. Insulin is not a cure: But it is the only treatment. Without insulin, people with type 1 diabetes would die. It takes a lot of work to manage diabetes: Children with type 1 diabetes usually look healthy. Thats because they and their families are working hard to keep blood sugar levels in a target range. They do this by checking levels frequently, and acting quickly when neededsuch as adding insulin to account for a special treat, or having a snack because of extra physical activity. Technology is helpful, but it doesnt work on its own: Some students wear insulin pumps to deliver insulin. A pump is another way to deliver insulin, and whether or not to use a pump is an individual choice. Other students wear continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), which take blood sugar readings every few minutes. But none of these devices works on its own. People still have to carefully monitor blood sugar, food intake, and activity, and make decisions about how much insulin to give and when. Blood sugar levels can change quickly: Its important to check blood sugar often, because there are many factors that can cause it to change from minute to minute. Low blood sugar needs immediate attention: If a student feels low, or you suspect a student is low, act right away. Do not leave the student alone. Check blood sugar, and give fast-acting sugar as needed. High blood sugar means extra trips to t Continue reading >>

Sweet Dreams For Chiyo

Sweet Dreams For Chiyo

Sunday, February 4, 2018 at 9 PM on CBC-TV Six Things You Might Not Know About Type One Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes is one of the most common chronic illnesses found in children. The CBC documentary, Sweet Dreams for Chiyo follows the Ehara family as they learn to cope with their daughters condition after she was diagnosed at the age of two. About 1 in 300 Canadian children are living with the disease, and new diagnoses are on the rise globally for reasons still unknown. Despite being relatively common, few people know about it or how it differs from the better-known Type 2 Diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes Is Nothing Like Type 2 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is very different from its more common cousin, Type 2. T1D is an incurable autoimmune disease. Insulin is an essential hormone in the body, and no one can survive without it. Something triggers the persons immune response to destroy the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, a little organ behind the stomach. Until there is a cure, an individual living with T1D will always require external insulin. The most common version of diabetes, Type 2, is caused by insulin resistance and accounts for 90-95% of cases . For some individuals living with Type 2 diabetes, a healthy lifestyle is enough to control their blood sugar levels, although many require additional medication and/or insulin. In children and youth, almost all individuals living with diabetes have Type 1, although Type 2 Diabetes is on the rise in this group as well. T1D is not caused by eating too much sugar or other poor lifestyle choices. Something, possibly a virus, sets off the immune system and causes it to turn against itself. No one knows yet if there is any way to prevent it. Researchers do know that genes play a role; if a family member has T1D, you have a Continue reading >>

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Brought to you by JDRF Millions of people around the world live with type 1 diabetes (T1D), a life-threatening autoimmune disease that strikes both children and adults. JDRF is the leading global organization funding research that will one day create a world without T1D. By joining JDRF Kids Walk, not only can your students make a difference for those living with T1D, but it’s fun and easy for everyone involved! Find out how your school can help today. As an educator, you provide an extremely important set of eyes and ears for students. Since you see them throughout the day, you notice when things are different, off or just not quite right. This is incredibly helpful and comforting to parents because teachers often uncover important and even life-changing discoveries. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of those diseases that teachers can often see signs of in the classroom, so it’s important to know what to look for. Take a look at some of these warning signs, and also get tips about how to accommodate a child with T1D in your classroom. 1. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It is not related to lifestyle, nor is it the result of anything the child (or family) did or did not do. Normally, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that helps the body use glucose (“blood sugar”) for energy. In people who have T1D, the body’s immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells and the pancreas produces very little or no insulin, so blood sugar levels can rise if unchecked. A person with T1D needs insulin injections or infusions to live. 2. Excessive urination, thirst and hunger are all symptoms of T1D. Because teachers spend so much time with kids, they may be among the first to notice symptoms that could be linked to diabetes. A child who is asking to use the bath Continue reading >>

Things Your Kid's Principal Won't Tell You | Reader's Digest

Things Your Kid's Principal Won't Tell You | Reader's Digest

By the afternoon, I can get pretty frazzled. These are 33 things your child's teacher won't tell you . I'm actually in the process of firing her. Legally, I can't tell you that, though, so that's why I'm sitting here quietly while you complain.This is what teachers want your kids to know . It changes with every grade. Of course I'm going to disapprove of a child missing class for vacation What I won't tell you is that I encouraged my own daughter to pull her kids out of school to visit me during my break. These teacher approved tricks will get your kids ready for back to school. We had a young man struggling to focus during year-end tests "My underwear is on backward," he said. That's the problem with all this testing: We're being judged by assessments taken by kids who may have their underwear on backward. If your child is struggling in school, here is what they should be telling their teacher . It's the parents who are tough. They're constantly trying to solve their kids' problems for them. I can influence and inspire kids and adults, help work through problems, and find solutions. And every day I can pop into a classroom where something interesting is going on. What other job gives you all of that? Cmon parents, this is your childs homework, not yours We know what a seventh-grader can do, and we know what an adult with an engineering degree can do, so please dont do your childs work for him. Kids need to make mistakes and struggle through things; its how they learn. Principals never know what the day will hold One minute youre mopping up vomit, the next youre in a special ed meeting, and the next youre dealing with two kids who got in a fight. Then you shovel snow off the sidewalk in front of school, you meet with teachers to decide whether to change the language ar Continue reading >>

10 Things You Need To Know About People With Type 1 Diabetes

10 Things You Need To Know About People With Type 1 Diabetes

1. They’re not Diabetics anymore. They are People With Diabetes. Calling them Diabetic is akin to calling someone a retard. They’re in a lifelong struggle to define themselves in any other way but diabetic. 2. People with Type 1 Diabetes can’t make Insulin. Insulin, in people without diabetes, is a hormone made in the pancreas. It allows glucose in the bloodstream to enter red blood cells for use in the body as energy. 3. Excess glucose in the bloodstream damages body systems and is the root of diabetic complications. Having too much, or too little glucose in the blood is dangerous and can ultimately cause death. Keeping blood glucose levels within normal levels is the ultimate goal of people with diabetes but can be affected by food, exercise, illness, stress, and a whole bunch of other annoying, unpredictable events. 4. They are not allergic to sugar. They balance what they eat by testing their blood glucose levels and taking insulin through injections. Yes, injections and finger pricks often hurt. Insulin does not come from animals or other people. It is genetically engineered using the E. coli bacteria and is biosynthetic. 5. Type 1 Diabetes is occurs when the Islets of Langerhans (insulin-producing cells in the pancreas) are attacked by the body. A lot of people ask why people with diabetes can’t get Islet Transplants. This is a relatively new therapy but requires massive doses of antiretroviral medications, which often have worse effects than living with diabetes. 6. Nobody understands why their bodies attack themselves. They did not get diabetes from their mothers who gained too much weight during pregnancy, from eating too much sugar, from exercising infrequently or from any other known reason. Not to be confused with Type 2 Diabetes. 7. They hate it whe Continue reading >>

School Supplies And Teacher Information For Your Type 1 Diabetes Child

School Supplies And Teacher Information For Your Type 1 Diabetes Child

School Supplies and Teacher Information for Your Type 1 Diabetes Child I am a full-time wife and mom, a part-time teacher, and a writer. I love vintage items and crochet! I am not a medical professional. These are just some suggestions based on what my family does. Other families do a lot more or a lot less. You have to figure out what works for you! A couple of weeks ago we were at a restaurant and my daughter's pump went bad. I had forgotten the travel bag with the extra infusion set, insulin etc. It all worked out fine but it was a scare. I have since become way more organized and have checklists to help because we always seem to forget something! So that said, I am definitely NOT an expert. Yes, its that time again, the beginning of a new school year. This will be my daughters third year attending school since her Type 1 Juvenile diabetes diagnosis . Rayna was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 12. In January of 2014, our family life changed. She has been hospitalized five times. In 2015 time we took her to the ER, she was in ketoacidosis (a T1 parents nightmare) and had swelling on her brain. In April of this year she had a finger infection that went almost to the bone and she lost mobility. This after two different doctors prescribed the WRONG antibiotics! That's another story. This year we face some new challenges because it will be her first year in the High School and 2nd year in marching band. I am so proud of her!! Even though she has serious health issues, as soon as she feels better, she is ready to tackle the next step! Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia Symptom Charts As I am preparing for the beginning of the school year in a few days, I am getting her packets of information and supplies ready. It took me months to really figure out exactly what I needed Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Month: 13 Ways To Get Involved Together

American Diabetes Month: 13 Ways To Get Involved Together

November is American Diabetes Month, a time to shine a spotlight on diabetes and diabetes research. Ready to get involved? Here are some noteworthy events happening across the country along with suggestions for creative ways you and your family can raise awareness about diabetes in your community. JDRF’s T1 Day What better way to kick off the month? The JDRF-sponsored T1 Day, held each year on November 1, is an opportunity to get people everywhere more engaged in talking about diabetes. Suggested T1 Day activities include visiting your child’s class for a kid-friendly diabetes Q&A, encouraging your child to write the local paper about type 1 awareness, and sharing some of your story via social media. Even something as simple as a tweet describing how diabetes has affected your family’s life can be a rich conversation starter. Ryan Reed was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 17, just as his racing career was taking off. At diagnosis, he was told he’d never race again. Now, at age 21, Ryan is driving the American Diabetes Association Drive to Stop DiabetesSM presented by Lilly Diabetes No. 16 Ford Mustang in the Nationwide Series™. Stop by or tune in for races on November 1 (Texas Motor Speedway), November 8 (Phoenix International Speedway), and November 15 (Homestead-Miami Speedway). November 14 is World Diabetes Day, an annual observance marked all across the globe. The “Go Blue” campaign encourages supporters to do just that for the occasion: Dress your family in blue and “go blue” at home by putting a blue bulb in your porch light or lighting a blue candle. Let it shine! In addition to wearing blue on November 14, Diabetes Social Media Advocacy founder Cherise Shockley encourages you to wear blue on all five Fridays of the month. Shockley started Continue reading >>

5 Things Every Teacher Should Know About Diabetes:

5 Things Every Teacher Should Know About Diabetes:

5 Things Every Teacher Should Know About Diabetes Teachers: givers of knowledge, confidence, and advice. Teachers play a huge role in your kids lives. They are the role models at school, the all-knowing question answerers, the keepers of the hall passes. Your kids depend on them to tell them what they need to know, and you as parents depend on them to keep your kids safe at school. The beginning of a new school year often means new teachersand for you, that means another explanation of your childs diabetes and how it should be handled in the classroom. Start the school year off right by giving them a few basic pointers, and help them remain the well-informed mentors your kids have come to trust. 5 Things Every Teacher Should Know About Diabetes: 1. Most kids with diabetes dont want to be different, and they dont want to be treated differently. 2. It is very unlikely that they will pretend to feel high or low to get out of the classroom. Take them seriously, and never deny the childs request for water or a blood sugar test. 3. Kids who inject insulin may need a little extra time before lunch to accommodate their injection. 4. Kids with diabetes must be able to check their blood sugar levels. If the child has low blood sugar, he or she must have access to glucose. If he or she has high blood sugar, the child must be given access to water and the restroom. 5. Children with diabetes must have access to emergency glucose in case of hypoglycemia. If a doctor prescribes snacks for a child with diabetes, they must be allowed to eat. Coaches and gym teachers may need to keep glucose tablets on hand in case of hypoglycemia. The best thing parents can do is take preventative measures to keep their children safe at school. Educating your childs teachers, classmates, and school fac Continue reading >>

What Your Child’s Teacher Should Know To Manage Diabetes At School

What Your Child’s Teacher Should Know To Manage Diabetes At School

Whether your child has been newly diagnosed or has been living with type 1 diabetes for some time, it’s very challenging. Many parents find it difficult to trust someone other than themselves or family members with training to care for their children. But when school time arises it will be time to send them off to be monitored and cared for by someone else many hours out of the day. Entrusting the medical needs of your child to someone else will be hard, but it’s a necessary step in teaching them to be more independent and live a happy, social life despite having type 1 diabetes. Parents Responsibilities for School It is your job, as your child’s parent to help create an environment when they are at school where they feel safe, cared for properly and treated equally to other students. With the proper planning and preparation, you provide this environment with the help of their teachers and school staff. The first step is to take the initiative to educate staff and teachers on the care of a type 1 student. Many school staff members may not realize there are a few additional efforts which are required on their end to ensure a positive learning environment where the child with type 1 diabetes feels safe. I advice reading the following: Ensuring Success at School Advanced planning: By making sure you plan ahead of time you will help to enable your child how to problem solve specific situations in school involving their diabetes. Here is a great tip: remember even with proper planning and a well-organized family, there will still be times when your plans don’t go according to plan. Communication: Good communication with the school and yourself is crucial to your child’s safety and well-being while at school. It will also help to provide yourself with a peace of min Continue reading >>

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