diabetestalk.net

10 Things Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

What Your Childs Teacher Doesnt Know About Type 1

What Your Childs Teacher Doesnt Know About Type 1

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney What Your Childs Teacher Doesnt Know About Type 1 Hallie Addington, guest blogger, ThePrincessAndThePump.com Nothing strikes fear in a parents heart like sending a child with type 1 diabetes to school. Whether the child is returning to class for the first time after diagnosis, or its the start of a new school year, handing him or her off to school personnel can bring anxiety and uncertainty. After all, who knows better how to take care of our children than us?!? We watch our friends count down the days until school starts (or a mid-year vacation ends) with glee and anticipation. We hear them talk about their concerns that their child will have friends in a new class and that the bus will come when it is scheduled. We just smile and nod, because our concerns are different. Our concerns deal with life and death. Who will take care of our child at school? Who will help count carbohydrates or deliver insulin? Who will know how to correct a high blood sugar? Who will know what to do if blood sugar is low? Who is going to keep my child alive and safe during the day? As a parent of a child with type 1 diabetes, I know these fears all too well. As a teacher, I was shocked with how little I knew. In the years preceding my daughters diabetes diagnosis, I had a few children with type 1 in my classroom. I was given the sheet with all the faces on itthe one depicting typical low and high blood sugar symptoms. I was told to send the children to the clinic if they experienced any of these symptoms. And that was it. I clearly remember sitting in my daughters hospital room during our week-long stay after her diagnosis and thinking, Oh my goodness. I didnt know. Anything could have happened. No one ever told me that type 1 was life-threatening. Continue reading >>

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Brought to you by JDRF Millions of people around the world live with type 1 diabetes (T1D), a life-threatening autoimmune disease that strikes both children and adults. JDRF is the leading global organization funding research that will one day create a world without T1D. By joining JDRF Kids Walk, not only can your students make a difference for those living with T1D, but it’s fun and easy for everyone involved! Find out how your school can help today. As an educator, you provide an extremely important set of eyes and ears for students. Since you see them throughout the day, you notice when things are different, off or just not quite right. This is incredibly helpful and comforting to parents because teachers often uncover important and even life-changing discoveries. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of those diseases that teachers can often see signs of in the classroom, so it’s important to know what to look for. Take a look at some of these warning signs, and also get tips about how to accommodate a child with T1D in your classroom. 1. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It is not related to lifestyle, nor is it the result of anything the child (or family) did or did not do. Normally, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that helps the body use glucose (“blood sugar”) for energy. In people who have T1D, the body’s immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells and the pancreas produces very little or no insulin, so blood sugar levels can rise if unchecked. A person with T1D needs insulin injections or infusions to live. 2. Excessive urination, thirst and hunger are all symptoms of T1D. Because teachers spend so much time with kids, they may be among the first to notice symptoms that could be linked to diabetes. A child who is asking to use the bath Continue reading >>

10 Things You Need To Know About People With Type 1 Diabetes

10 Things You Need To Know About People With Type 1 Diabetes

1. They’re not Diabetics anymore. They are People With Diabetes. Calling them Diabetic is akin to calling someone a retard. They’re in a lifelong struggle to define themselves in any other way but diabetic. 2. People with Type 1 Diabetes can’t make Insulin. Insulin, in people without diabetes, is a hormone made in the pancreas. It allows glucose in the bloodstream to enter red blood cells for use in the body as energy. 3. Excess glucose in the bloodstream damages body systems and is the root of diabetic complications. Having too much, or too little glucose in the blood is dangerous and can ultimately cause death. Keeping blood glucose levels within normal levels is the ultimate goal of people with diabetes but can be affected by food, exercise, illness, stress, and a whole bunch of other annoying, unpredictable events. 4. They are not allergic to sugar. They balance what they eat by testing their blood glucose levels and taking insulin through injections. Yes, injections and finger pricks often hurt. Insulin does not come from animals or other people. It is genetically engineered using the E. coli bacteria and is biosynthetic. 5. Type 1 Diabetes is occurs when the Islets of Langerhans (insulin-producing cells in the pancreas) are attacked by the body. A lot of people ask why people with diabetes can’t get Islet Transplants. This is a relatively new therapy but requires massive doses of antiretroviral medications, which often have worse effects than living with diabetes. 6. Nobody understands why their bodies attack themselves. They did not get diabetes from their mothers who gained too much weight during pregnancy, from eating too much sugar, from exercising infrequently or from any other known reason. Not to be confused with Type 2 Diabetes. 7. They hate it whe Continue reading >>

Notify New Teachers About Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes

Notify New Teachers About Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes

Summary: This is a sample email to notify new teachers at the beginning of the school year about your childs type 1 diabetes and highlight important aspects of the 504 plan. When Q was in grade school and had one main teacher, we usually set up a meeting with the teacher, nurse, and the staff member who oversaw her 504 plan a few days before school began or during the first week of school to go over her care. We also looped in any teachers that might see her during the day who hadnt already had her as a student before. Since Q is in middle school, she now has 8 different teachers during the day. Eight! This year I decided to send a quick email in advance of school starting to highlight a few important points. It isnt meant to cover all aspects of her daily diabetes management at school, but rather is intended as a heads up that Q will be in their class and to alert them of her medical condition. They will learn more at her upcoming annual 504 meeting. I decided to share my email here on D-Mom Blog in case other parents needed a starting point for their own communication with new teachers. Im also including the 10 Things Teachers Should Know About Diabetes and Glucagon PDFs below in case you would like to send those to staff or print them out. My name is LC and I am the parent of Q who will be in your class this year. Q has type 1 diabetes Im attaching a resource called 10 Things Teachers Should Know About Diabetes. Please take a few minutes to read this. I am also attaching a copy of Qs diabetes instructions. If you are a classroom teacher, you will receive a low blood sugar kit. This is a pink pencil box and includes juice boxes, peanut butter crackers, and Smarties. (The PE kit also includes glucagon and blood sugar testing supplies.) If supplies run low, please let Continue reading >>

New Resource Helps Teachers Keep Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Safe

New Resource Helps Teachers Keep Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Safe

New resource helps teachers keep kids with type 1 diabetes safe Parents of kids with type 1 diabetes live in fear of their kids blood sugar dipping too low at school. A new resource is here to help. One day, when Trudy Adams son, Dylan, was lying down for his afternoon rest period in junior kindergarten , he began convulsing and lost consciousness. Dylan has type 1 diabetes , and this was exactly the kind of crisis his parents feared when they sent him off to school: Dylans blood sugar had dropped so low he needed a life-saving injection of a medication called glucagon, which wasnt on hand, since school personnel had been reluctant to learn how to administer it. Thankfully, Dylans dad, who got to school faster than the ambulances, was able to give the shot, and Dylan bounced back. Adams is one of many parentswho worries about their diabetic kid every day. One in every 300 Canadian kids has type 1 diabetes, and according to new survey data released by the Canadian Paediatric Society, the Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario, and the Hospital for Sick Children, nearly one-third of Ontario parents whose kids have the condition arent confident the school staff can keep their kids safe, and nearly 13 percent have to go to school at least once a week to monitor their childs care. However, a new online resource for parents and school staff should help prevent near-misses like Dylans, while providing peace of mind for the parents of kids with type 1. Intended to ensure kids with the condition can participate fully and safely in all aspects of school life, [email protected] features accurate, easy-to-digest lessons on topics like how to recognize and treat hypoglycaemia, as well as a just-launched series of engaging animated videos . All of the content carries the authority of h Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Schools - Information For Teachers & Staff

Diabetes In Schools - Information For Teachers & Staff

Diabetes in schools - information for teachers & staff Diabetes in schools - information for teachers & staff This page is an overview of what teachers and staff should know about diabetes with links to further support and resources If you have a child with Type 1 diabetes in your care at school, youll know that theres a lot to think about. Or if a child with Type 1 diabetes is joining your school, there will be lots of things to put in place to ensure the child is cared for correctly. Over the past two years weve been busy supporting schools to put the right care in place for children with diabetes through our Type 1 diabetes: Make the grade campaign . Weve developed lots of easy to follow, free resources to help schools know what to do and how to do it. On this page you will find information on: Watch this video from the Safe in School campaign to hear from children, staff and parents about what good care involves. Students with Type 1 diabetes moving class in the same school Talk about if their childs classes are changing, or the staff responsible for caring for them at school. Let them know about any planned trips. And consider if there are any other changes that might affect them, such as changes to the school curriculum, timing of lunch and breaks or storage of medication and equipment. Ask parents if any aspects of the students care might change, or if there is any particular area they would like the schools help on, e.g. taking responsibility for certain aspects of care as the student grows up Arrange training for new carers, involve the diabetes nurse and parents in this. Allow time for new carers to work with current carers so that they build up their confidence and the student feels comfortable with them. Update the students individual healthcare plan if nec Continue reading >>

Tips To Help Teachers Keep Kids With Diabetes Safe At School

Tips To Help Teachers Keep Kids With Diabetes Safe At School

* TALKING POINTS SCHOOL GROUP: Welcome the group. Thank them for taking time out of day to learn more about diabetes. Their attendance means they are definitely interested and committed to providing an optimal, supportive environment for their students with diabetes. Tell a personal story of caring for a child with diabetes that makes this session so important. Nearly 21 million adults and children in the U.S. have diabetes. This includes <#> children at About Diabetes * TALKING POINTS Engage the audience in conversation. Ask them if they know anyone with diabetes? Encourage 1-2 people to share their personal link. Describe your personal link, if you have one. Transition to: “Let me tell you a little bit more about diabetes…†About Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic illness in which the body does not produce insulin (type 1) or does not produce enough insulin or properly use it (type 2). Insulin is vital for everyday life because it converts sugar, starches or other food into energy. Diabetes is the sixth deadliest disease in the U.S. Diabetes has no cure. * TALKING POINTS Define diabetes and the seriousness of this disease. About Diabetes Type 1 diabetes Occurs when the pancreas does not produce insulin Requires multiple doses of insulin every day – via shots or an insulin pump Accounts for 5 to 10% of all cases of diabetes and is the most prevalent type of diabetes among children and adolescents Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented. * TALKING POINTS Ask the audience if they have a student with type 1 diabetes? Ask how many have more than one? Describe type 1 diabetes. Stress that type 1 diabetes can not be prevented. Type 2 diabetes Occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or use insulin prop Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Information For Teachers And Child-care Providers

Children With Diabetes - Information For Teachers And Child-care Providers

Information for Teachers and Child-Care Providers Teachers and child-care providers are likely to have a child with type 1 diabetes in their care at some point in their career. This page provides basic information about diabetes, offer suggestions for how to care for children with diabetes, and refers you to other sources of information. Type 1 diabetes, previously called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is an autoimmune disease in which the body destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Insulin is required by the body to use glucose, the simple sugar into which foods are broken down by our digestive system. Without insulin, the body starves to death. It's important to note that everyone is insulin-dependent. People without diabetes make insulin in their pancreas. People with type 1 diabetes must inject insulin. Diabetes is not contagious. And though there is no cure, diabetes can be managed with insulin injections, blood sugar monitoring, proper diet and exercise. Children with diabetes face two problems that teachers need to understand: hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. You should learn the symptoms and how to treat each. Hypoglycemia , or low blood sugar, occurs when the blood sugar level is too low, due to too much insulin, too little food, or too much exercise. Children with low blood sugar sometimes behave erratically or act sleepy, and are often very hungry and shaky. Low blood sugar must be treated immediately by giving the child foods with simple sugars, such as glucose tablets, fruit juice or regular (NOT diet) soda. If you suspect that a child has low blood sugar, do not leave the child unattended because the child can lose consciousness. Never send a child who you suspect has a low blood sugar to the nurse or clinic alone. Hypergl Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Teachers Of Students With Diabetes

10 Tips For Teachers Of Students With Diabetes

Home Education and Information 10 Tips for Teachers of Students with Diabetes 10 Tips for Teachers of Students with Diabetes Posted by Editorial Team On August 14, 2014 In Education and Information The upcoming school year is approaching and its time to start preparing your children for a successful year. If one (or more) of them live with diabetes, you have a little more planning than most to think about. Elementary school Principal with type 1 diabetes and MiniMed Ambassador, Vince Myers , who you may remember from Life is a Journey, Not a Race , provides his 10 tips for you to share with your childrens teachers in preparation of the new school year. A printed copy of these tips can also come in handy when a teacher is absent and a substitute teacher is filling in. We hope this will be of value to all educators, particularly those who have never had a student with diabetes in their classroom. Every child with diabetes may experience different symptoms of low blood sugar. Some of these symptoms could include weakness and/or fatigue, headaches, sweating, irritability, shaking, excessive hunger and rapid heart rate. Situations that may affect blood sugar include insulin intake, food consumption, exercise, illness, stress, and changes in routine. Your student will likely need to eat snacks during class when they feel low. This is imperative and essential in helping make sure their blood sugar doesnt drop too low. You can help your student by allowing them to keep an emergency stash of snacks (including fast-acting carbohydrates) in your classroom in case they forget. Most kids with diabetes dont want to and shouldnt be treated differently. Do not limit their activities, draw attention, or deny their request if they have or ask for water, a snack, blood sugar test, or bat Continue reading >>

What Your Child’s Teacher Should Know To Manage Diabetes At School

What Your Child’s Teacher Should Know To Manage Diabetes At School

Whether your child has been newly diagnosed or has been living with type 1 diabetes for some time, it’s very challenging. Many parents find it difficult to trust someone other than themselves or family members with training to care for their children. But when school time arises it will be time to send them off to be monitored and cared for by someone else many hours out of the day. Entrusting the medical needs of your child to someone else will be hard, but it’s a necessary step in teaching them to be more independent and live a happy, social life despite having type 1 diabetes. Parents Responsibilities for School It is your job, as your child’s parent to help create an environment when they are at school where they feel safe, cared for properly and treated equally to other students. With the proper planning and preparation, you provide this environment with the help of their teachers and school staff. The first step is to take the initiative to educate staff and teachers on the care of a type 1 student. Many school staff members may not realize there are a few additional efforts which are required on their end to ensure a positive learning environment where the child with type 1 diabetes feels safe. I advice reading the following: Ensuring Success at School Advanced planning: By making sure you plan ahead of time you will help to enable your child how to problem solve specific situations in school involving their diabetes. Here is a great tip: remember even with proper planning and a well-organized family, there will still be times when your plans don’t go according to plan. Communication: Good communication with the school and yourself is crucial to your child’s safety and well-being while at school. It will also help to provide yourself with a peace of min Continue reading >>

Tips For Teachers With A Type 1 Elementary Student

Tips For Teachers With A Type 1 Elementary Student

Tips For Teachers with a Type 1 Elementary Student As a Type 1 diabetic myself , diabetes is always on my mind all day, everyday. As a teacher this means of course diabetes doesnt stop when Im at school. There have been plenty of times during the school day when Ive had to hurriedly eat peanut butter crackers in between one-on-one reading, check my blood sugar at my desk, or laugh at my pump beeping during calendar time. My one and only pump failure also happened while I was in the middle of teaching a lesson. Ive yet to have a T1D student in my classroom, however, I often think about what it would be like if I did. For instance, our school celebrated Christmas with a school wide Polar Express day in December. The kids wore pajamas to school, we watched the movie, and had treats afterwards. As I was passing out the snacks I kept thinking to myself how Im so thankful none of my kids have to deal with T1D today. Cookies, hot chocolate (made with chocolate milk), and marshmallowsI didnt want to think about the total carbs in all of this. IF one of my students had been a type 1 diabetic I would have consulted the parent in advance to see if they wanted me to count the carbs OR if theyd rather have an alternative snack. Either way, I would have made sure they didnt miss out on the fun! Here are some helpful tips for teachers with a Type 1 student: Notify parents of a change in schedule. Last minute changes happen all the time at school. Gym times get changed, etc. T1Ds will need to take these changes into consideration. If a student isnt acting like themselves have their BG checked. Anything and everything affects blood glucose levels.Know that a student could be a cool 100 at their finger check, but drop to 50 within minutes. Students may experience this after P.E. or rece Continue reading >>

8 Things Your Childs Teacher Should Know About T1d

8 Things Your Childs Teacher Should Know About T1d

8 Things Your Childs Teacher Should Know About T1D A parent crafts a note every teacher should have in their inbox if they have a student with Type 1 diabetes. Its that time of year back to school! New notebooks, new clothes, new bookbag, and new teachers that will need a crash course in diabetes education. When my son was first diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, we were two weeks into 4th grade. We were lucky in that his teacher has a child that had been diagnosed a year earlier with T1D. That first year was so much easier because she just understood. She even knew to stock up her desk drawer with juice boxes before I had a clue! But if the stars dont align so perfectly for you with your childs new teacher, here are 8 essential tips you can give to get your childs teacher up to speed on Type 1 diabetes. If you feel shy talking to them about this, you can just forward them this article: 1. Things change quickly. Blood sugars have a mind of their own and what my childs levels were at 8:15 a.m. have no bearing on his/her blood sugar levels five minutes later. Children can go high or low based on a zillion different factors that scientists cant quantify. 2. Blood glucose numbers are not bad and they are not good; they just are. A child is at his/her best and in no danger when in a target blood sugar range. The numbers simply provide information that can be acted upon. If a childs blood glucose levels go high, the child needs to have a bolus shot of insulin and to drink water. If they go low, the child needs to be treated with the right food and re-checked. In the target range let it be. 3. My childs body works differently. He or she will snack, drink, and use the bathroom more often than average based on blood sugar levels. Please allow them the space for that flexibility. 4 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Advocacy...going To School

Diabetes Advocacy...going To School

Sending any child to school may often cause a parent great anxiety at leaving their little angel in the care of strangers for an extended period of time. This anxiety becomes ten-fold when sending a child with a chronic illness to school. No one can possibly care for our child like we do so how do you keep your child as safe as possible when you arent there? If you live in the USA, you ensure that you have a 504 Plan in place that outlines the quality of care and responsibilities legally required by the school. If you live in Canada the road is not as clear. In Canada, each board has a separate policy. If your board does not have a Diabetes Policy in place, approach them and ask that it be done. With the increased number of children being diagnosed with this disease, it is in their best interest to prepare specific policies relating to the care of students with this disease. Ask to have a say, investigate other policies and try to work out one that is mutually beneficial to all parties. Policy or not, 504 Plan or not, your child must still be educated and it is still the parents responsibility to do as much as they can to prepare the school to care for their child. Contact your school and ask for an in-service with all personnel who will be in contact with your child. Have your CDE or public health nurse attend to ensure that everyone is properly trained and aware of what is involved in having a child with Type 1 diabetes in their school. If your child is on an Insulin pump, you may wish to show the pump or have pictures of it made available so that everyone understands that it is a piece of medical equipment.You may also wish to go over some of the alarms so that staff are aware of what to do even if your child is either too young to understand or not able to communic Continue reading >>

10 Things Your Teacher Should Know About Type One Diabetes - Danii Foundation

10 Things Your Teacher Should Know About Type One Diabetes - Danii Foundation

10 Things your teacher should know about type ONE diabetes 10 Things your teacher should know about type ONE diabetes 10 things teachers should know about having a student with type ONE diabetes When your student has type 1 diabetes, the body doesnt make the insulin needed to metabolise sugar into energy. People with type 1 must either give injections of insulin or wear an insulin pump to stay alive. Basic info: Food raises blood sugar. Exercise and activity lower blood sugar. It is hard to have diabetes, even when I have an insulin pump. My blood sugars will vary every day and there is no such thing as control with Type 1. Please be patient while I deal with low and high blood sugars. 2. I wear super cool gadgets that help keep me alive. My insulin pump and/or continuous glucose monitor may look like the latest iPod or mobile phone some alarms even sound like a ring tone. Please dont take them away from me you would be putting my health in danger. I need to keep glucose tabs and snacks in my desk (or pockets) in case of emergency. If go low, even a trip to the nurses office could be too risky without immediate fast acting sugar. 4. I may not be brave enough to speak up for myself I depend on you to put my health and well-being first. Its not always easy to speak up when Im low or high and need to take care of diabetes. It helps to know youre looking out for my best interests. 5. I need immediate attention when I tell you I feel low I may also need your help. Please give me a snack or let me check my blood sugar immediately. Dont leave me alone or send me to the nurses office by myself. My body and brain wont be functioning properly and I could make a wrong turn or collapse in the hallway. I also cannot finish a test or complete my work until I have treated my low. 6. Continue reading >>

A Teacher’s Guide To Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

A Teacher’s Guide To Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is a part of our library of resources for Elementary/Primary School. Read more on test taking, diabetic alert dogs, class presentations and creating a school treatment plan. Being a teacher comes with the responsibility of taking care of 20-30 children on a daily basis. In your career, you may have a student with Type 1 diabetes in your class. Although you may feel overwhelmed about what to expect, there is no need! This guide will make you aware of the conditions of a child with T1D, which will give you a better understanding of how to keep him or her healthy and safe at school. What is Type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s own immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in their pancreas. People with Type 1 are insulin-dependent for life, and must manually give themselves insulin through multiple daily injections or an insulin pump. They must carefully balance insulin, food, exercise, and other factors in order to prevent or minimize serious short and long-term complications due to out of range blood sugar levels. If you have not heard much about Type 1, here are some other fast facts – T1D is not caused by a lack of exercise or eating too much sugar T1D is not contagious There is no cure for T1D at the present moment Although T1D has also been called “juvenile diabetes,” T1D affects both children and adults How can I help? It is important to remember that children with T1D can participate in all of the same activities as other kids, such as play sports and join activities. They can also eat sweets and any other type of food/drink, as long as they are giving themselves the appropriate amount of insulin to cover the meal. Some foods affect blood sugar levels differently than others. Read Continue reading >>

More in diabetes