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Zinc Deficiency Type 1 Diabetes

Zinc And Diabetes Mellitus: Understanding Molecular Mechanisms And Clinical Implications

Zinc And Diabetes Mellitus: Understanding Molecular Mechanisms And Clinical Implications

Abstract Diabetes mellitus is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Studies have shown that Zinc has numerous beneficial effects in both type-1 and type-2 diabetes. We aim to evaluate the literature on the mechanisms and molecular level effects of Zinc on glycaemic control, β-cell function, pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. A review of published studies reporting mechanisms of action of Zinc in diabetes was undertaken in PubMed and SciVerse Scopus medical databases using the following search terms in article title, abstract or keywords; (“Zinc” or “Zn”) and (“mechanism” or “mechanism of action” or “action” or “effect” or “pathogenesis” or “pathology” or “physiology” or “metabolism”) and (“diabetes” or “prediabetes” or “sugar” or “glucose” or “insulin”). The literature search identified the following number of articles in the two databases; PubMed (n = 1799) and SciVerse Scopus (n = 1879). After removing duplicates the total number of articles included in the present review is 111. Our results show that Zinc plays an important role in β-cell function, insulin action, glucose homeostasis and the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. Numerous in-vitro and in-vivo studies have shown that Zinc has beneficial effects in both type-1 and type-2 diabetes. However further randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trials conducted for an adequate duration, are required to establish therapeutic safety in humans. Notes The authors declare that they have no competing interests. PR and SP substantially contributed to the general idea and design of the study. PR and SP were involved in data collection. PR, PK, PG and GRC planned data analysis. PR and SP drafted the manuscri Continue reading >>

Chromium, Zinc And Magnesium Status In Type 1 Diabetes.

Chromium, Zinc And Magnesium Status In Type 1 Diabetes.

Chromium, zinc and magnesium status in type 1 diabetes. aDepartment of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung bPlanning Department, Fooyin University Hospital, Pingtung cDepartment of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University dDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital eDepartment of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2015 Nov;18(6):588-92. doi: 10.1097/MCO.0000000000000225. PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Chromium, zinc, and magnesium are involved in insulin signal transduction, glucose metabolism, and cellular antioxidative defense. This review details the statuses of chromium, zinc, and magnesium in type 1 diabetes patients. RECENT FINDINGS: Blood levels of trace elements (especially magnesium and zinc) were lower in type 1 diabetes patients than in controls and were even lower in type 1 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control. Studies with mouse models have shown that chromium and magnesium supplementation alleviated diabetes-induced complications and improved glycemic control. SUMMARY: Many studies indicated positive correlations between decreased levels of serum chromium, zinc, and magnesium and poor glycemic control. The supplementation of type 1 diabetes patients with zinc, magnesium, and chromium may help to control diabetes and prevent diabetes-related oxidative injuries, but require further study. Continue reading >>

Fight Diabetes With The Power Of Zinc

Fight Diabetes With The Power Of Zinc

(NewsTarget) Diabetes is an escalating issue in the United States, and there are no signs of this health ailment diminishing. According to the American Diabetes Association, 23.6 million adults and children have diabetes in the U.S. That is 7.8% of the population according to the latest data formed from 2007, and 1.6 million new cases are diagnosed each year. Luckily, there are many natural remedies that may aid in suppressing the negative effects of diabetes. Many of these remedies may completely cure or prevent diabetes when used properly. Research shows that zinc, an essential trace element responsible for over 300 enzyme functions, can aid in normalizing the negative effects of diabetes mellitus. According to the study, zinc has been shown to mitigate the harmful effects of diabetes by improving glycemic control in type I and type II diabetes. Many of the enzyme systems in which zinc is a necessity for are involved with the metabolism of blood sugar, and therefore make zinc a natural catalyst for insulin secretion. The pancreas is an endocrine gland responsible for producing hormones like glucagon, somatostatin, and - you guessed it - insulin. The beta cells that secrete insulin in your pancreas are also highly stored with zinc. Without the high concentrations of zinc, the beta cells suffer. Luckily, beta cells are equipped with their own special transporter called 'zinc transporter 8', which makes it easy for the beta cells to store the zinc. However, it is known that any metamorphosis of the genes in the zinc transporter 8 causes type 2 diabetes. It is also now known that antibodies against the zinc transporter are present in type 1 diabetic patients, which means that these antibodies are associated with type 1 diabetes. It is no wonder why zinc is as popular as i Continue reading >>

6 Essential Minerals For Diabetics

6 Essential Minerals For Diabetics

If you are diabetic, there are many treatment options available, and supplements to try. However, help for diabetes may be closer than you think. These 6 essential minerals can fight the symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Minerals are an essential part of the human body. Minerals are just as vital as vitamins in keeping your body healthy and happy. In fact, mineral deficiencies can lead to a host of health problems, including an increased chance of diabetes. If you have diabetes, ensuring your diet is rich in the following minerals will help you restore balance to your body and reduce the need for diabetes medications. Combined with other natural treatments for diabetes, you may find that you no longer suffer from diabetes side effects at all. Before taking any of these supplements, consult with a health professional to identify their potential risks and benefits in your particular case. Chromium Chromium is a well-documented mineral that can help prevent and help with controlling blood sugar levels in existing diabetes. Chromium is also essential for the population of insulin receptors, for binding insulin to cells, and for increasing the utilization of glucose. While high doses of the mineral can be toxic, small dosage amounts have been shown to help diabetics with type 2 diabetes. Some studies have indicated that chromium picolinate may be more effective than other forms of chromium in supplements, as it is easier for the body to absorb and use. What It Does According to studies, chromium can enhance the effects of insulin. Deficiencies in chromium impair blood glucose control. In several studies, it was shown that those with diabetes have abnormally low chromium levels. The trace mineral may be able to reduce insulin levels and improve the lipid profile in Continue reading >>

Zinc And Other Metals Deficiencies And Risk Of Type 1 Diabetes: An Ecological Study In The High Risk Sardinia Island

Zinc And Other Metals Deficiencies And Risk Of Type 1 Diabetes: An Ecological Study In The High Risk Sardinia Island

Zinc and Other Metals Deficiencies and Risk of Type 1 Diabetes: An Ecological Study in the High Risk Sardinia Island 1 Department of Civil-Environmental Engineering and Architecture, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy, 2 Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy, 3 Centre for the Study of Diabetes Complications and Metabolic Diseases, St. Michele Hospital, Cagliari, Italy, 4 Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy, Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Analyzed the data: PV PZ AS. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: PV SP AM. Wrote the paper: PV PZ GB SP CM CT MS. Geochemical samples collection: PV SP AM. Set of geochemical archive: PV. Design and supervision of the study: PV PZ GB MS. Creation of figures and tables: PV AS. Interpretation of biological rational: PZ. Type 1 diabetes incidence data collection: CM CT. Received 2015 Jun 5; Accepted 2015 Oct 5. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are properly credited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Type 1 diabetes incidence presents a decreasing gradient in Europe from the Nordic countries to the Mediterranean ones. Exception to this gradient is represented by Sardinia, the second largest Mediterranean island whose population shows the highest incidence in Europe, after Finland. The genetic features of this population have created a fertile ground for the epidemic of the disease, however, as well as being strikingly high, the incidence rate has suddenly presented a continuous increase from the 50s, no Continue reading >>

Take Zinc If Your Diabetes Is High

Take Zinc If Your Diabetes Is High

If you are healthy, you may not need to take a zinc supplement. But if your health isn’t good enough, a new meta-analysis indicates that you probably need to take one. The study categorizes people with type 2 diabetes as “non-healthy.” The mineral zinc plays an important role in how our bodies use insulin and in the metabolism of carbohydrates. When non-healthy people take a zinc supplement, the new study found that they can “significantly reduce total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.” An earlier meta-analysis focused entirely on people with diabetes. It found that zinc helps us manage both our blood glucose and lipids better. The journal Nutrition and Metabolism published the new meta-analysis in 2015 as “Effects of Zinc supplementation on serum lipids.” Some of these same researchers published the earlier meta-analysis, “Effects of Zinc Supplementation on Diabetes Mellitus,” in the journal Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome in 2015. The full texts of both studies are free online. Low levels of zinc can be deadly One third of all the people in the world are deficient in zinc. Marginal zinc deficiency is common in developed countries, and severe zinc deficiency is common in developing countries. It is a major factor contributing to the deaths of 1.4 percent of people worldwide. It is associated with diabetes, cancer, and many other diseases. The new meta-analysis reviewed and summarized the findings of 32 studies involving more than 14,000 people. The earlier meta-analysis of people who have diabetes included three studies of people with type 1 and 22 studies of people with type 2 diabetes. The earlier study was the first and apparently the only meta-analysis of zinc supplementation for people with diabetes. How much zinc to take You ne Continue reading >>

Zinc And Diabetes

Zinc And Diabetes

Z is the last letter in the alphabet, which means it often receives little or no attention. Yet Z is the first letter in the word “zinc.” How much thought have you ever given to zinc? Maybe some, if you take zinc supplements for a cold, for example. But new research indicates that zinc is something else that people with diabetes should think about. Why? Read on. In case you’re wondering what the heck zinc does, it’s helpful to know that it’s an essential mineral that plays very important roles in the body. The body can’t make zinc, so we must take it in from food sources. Zinc is stored in the muscles, blood cells, retina of the eye, skin, bone, kidney, liver, pancreas, and in men, prostate. What does zinc do for us? Primarily, zinc helps the immune system function properly. It’s also needed for cell growth and division, wound healing, and the breakdown of carbohydrate for energy. We need zinc to maintain our sense of taste and smell, too. Finally, zinc is an antioxidant, protecting our cells from free radicals, or molecules that can wreak havoc and possibly lead to heart disease and cancer. Zinc is found in many foods. The main sources of zinc in the American diet are red meat, poultry, and seafood, but it’s also found in legumes, whole grains, nuts, and dairy foods. Zinc is better absorbed from animal foods than from plant foods, since compounds called phytates that are found in plants can hinder its absorption. Daily zinc requirements are 11 milligrams for adult men and 8 milligrams for adult women. Symptoms of zinc deficiency include stunted growth (in children), hair loss, diarrhea, decreased appetite, eye and skin lesions, delayed wound healing, and weight loss. People with chronic gastrointestinal disorders, such as Crohn disease, are at risk for Continue reading >>

Zinc Benefits For Diabetes: Natural Blood Sugar Control And More

Zinc Benefits For Diabetes: Natural Blood Sugar Control And More

I take zinc when I feel a cold coming on and find that it definitely helps to keep me from getting sick. Many people use zinc for this immune-boosting purpose, but zinc benefits can do more for your body than just that. The benefits of taking zinc include lowering your risk of heart disease, treating Parkinson’s disease, and even helping clear up acne. As if that weren’t enough, yet another reason to love zinc is that it can be helpful for diabetes care. Zinc is highly concentrated in the islet cells of the pancreas, where insulin is produced.[1] Zinc benefits include promoting healthy insulin function, providing natural blood sugar control, and might even help to prevent diabetes in the first place. Zinc Benefits and Insulin Laboratory studies have shown that zinc acts like insulin when administered to insulin-sensitive tissue and that it seems to stimulate insulin action.[1] It binds to insulin receptors, activates insulin signaling pathways, and more, all of which result in glucose uptake by cells and clearance of glucose from the blood.[2] Zinc is also necessary for the correct processing, storage, and secretion of insulin,[1] and it can protect against β-cell loss, a hallmark of diabetes.[3] Because zinc is so closely tied to insulin functioning, zinc deficiency is associated with poor β-cell function and higher incidences of insulin resistance.[3] Reduced Zinc Levels Seen in Diabetic Patients It is not surprising then, to learn that low zinc levels are often associated with diabetes. One study found that prediabetic individuals are more likely to be zinc deficient, and that at any given body mass index (BMI), people with lower zinc levels are more insulin resistant than those with higher zinc levels.[3] Multiple studies have found high rates of zinc deficien Continue reading >>

Vitamins And Minerals

Vitamins And Minerals

Tweet Depending on the type of treatment regimen you use to control your diabetes, there are some vitamins and minerals that may be beneficial for your condition. Before adding any vitamins or adding dietary supplements to your daily diet, discuss these changes with your healthcare team and doctor to ensure they are safe alongside any prescribed medication you're on. ALA and GLA ALA (alpha-lipoic acid) is a versatile and potent antioxidant, and may function to help diabetic neuropathy and reduce pain from free-radical damage. Also, some studies link ALA to decreased insulin resistance and thus the control of blood sugar. GLA (gamma-lipoic acid) is another naturally occurring antioxidant that is present in evening primrose oil, borage oil and blackcurrant seed oil. GLA may improve the function of nerves damaged by diabetic neuropathy. Biotin Biotin works in synergy with insulin in the body, and independently increases the activity of the enzyme glucokinase. Glucokinase is responsible for the first step of glucose utilisation, and is therefore an essential component of normal bodily functioning. Glucokinase occurs only in the liver, and in sufferers from diabetes its concentration may be extremely low. Supplements of biotin may have a significant effect on glucose levels for both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Carnitine (L-Carnitine, Acetyl L-Carnitine) Carnitine is required by the body in order to correctly use body fat in the production of energy. It is naturally occurring and derives from hydrophilic amino acids. Diabetics who try carnitine generally respond well, and high levels of fat in the bloodstream (cholesterol and triglycerides) may fall fast. Carnitine helps to break down fatty acids in the body and binds acyl residues. For these reasons, it may be useful to pre Continue reading >>

Low Zinc Levels Could Be Associated With Prediabetes Risk

Low Zinc Levels Could Be Associated With Prediabetes Risk

Low zinc levels could be associated with prediabetes risk Low zinc levels could be associated with prediabetes risk Brain cells identified that control appetite and body weight 29 September 2017 Scientists have observed an association between zinc metabolism and the development of prediabetes. The findings suggest that lower concentrations of trace elements in the blood (particularly zinc) play an important role in prediabetes development, although they do not yet understand why. Russian researchers from RUDN University and P. G. Demidov Yaroslavl State University believe that investigpating zinc metabolism in diabetes pathogenesis merits further investigation, and speculate that zinc-containing foods should be explored as a preventative measure for prediabetes. The scientists recruited 80 women with prediabetes and 80 healthy postmenopausal women and measured their serum levels of 28 elements. Those with prediabetes were shown to have higher HbA1c , blood glucose levels and insulin , and of all the trace elements studies only serum zinc (Zn) was significantly lower, almost a 10 per cent decrease, compared to the healthy control group. Study author Alexey A. Tinkov explains: "The study was based on the existing data on the role of individual trace elements (zinc, chromium, vanadium) in the insulin signal transduction. At the same time, it is believed that a number of toxic metals (cadmium, mercury) contribute to the development of insulin resistance (insulin resistance of tissues to the insulin signalling) and subsequently diabetes mellitus type 2." There was no evidence from the study to suggest that lower zinc levels contributed to insulin resistance , but zinc plays an important role in insulin synthesis in pancreatic beta cells , and has been shown to protect these Continue reading >>

Poor Sugar Regulation In Diabetics Caused By Zinc Deficiency

Poor Sugar Regulation In Diabetics Caused By Zinc Deficiency

Poor Sugar Regulation In Diabetics Caused By Zinc Deficiency The role of zinc in diabetes mellitus and conseqently, in overall health, has been looked at by researchers for years. More and more diabetics have been found to be deficient in the mineral and the number is growing. The good news is zinc supplementation in diabetics has been shown to help in controlling blood sugar levels as well as improving immune system health. Related: Sexual Activity Linked to Zinc Deficiency And Infertility In Men Type 1 and type 2 diabetics have been found to be mostly zinc deficient according to some research. Research on humans is helping patients to better understand the role of zinc in diabetes mellitus. The number of people with diabetes and pre-diabetes is fast increasing. Studies on humans have shown the beneficial effects of Zinc supplementation in patients with diabetes. Related: This One Mineral Knocks Back Colds And Flu Naturally Meta Analysis Examined The Effects Of Zinc A systematic review of published studies reporting the effects of Zinc supplementations on diabetes mellitus was undertaken from the following databases; PubMed, Web of Science and SciVerse Scopus. A meta-analysis of studies examining the effects of Zinc supplementation on clinical and biochemical parameters in patients with diabetes was performed. The total number of articles included in the present review is 25, which included 3 studies on type-1 diabetes and 22 studies on type-2 diabetes. Related: This One Mineral Can Help You Taste Your Food Better Zinc Treated Group Showed Reduction In Blood Sugar and More There were 12 studies comparing the effects of Zinc supplementation on fasting blood glucose in patients with type-2 diabetes. The pooled mean difference in fasting blood glucose between Zinc supple Continue reading >>

Effects Of Zinc Supplementation On Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Effects Of Zinc Supplementation On Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Go to: The number of people with diabetes and pre-diabetes are exponentially increasing. Studies on humans have shown the beneficial effects of Zinc supplementation in patients with diabetes. The present study aims to systematically evaluate the literature and meta-analyze the effects of Zinc supplementation on diabetes. A systematic review of published studies reporting the effects of Zinc supplementations on diabetes mellitus was undertaken. The literature search was conducted in the following databases; PubMed, Web of Science and SciVerse Scopus. A meta-analysis of studies examining the effects of Zinc supplementation on clinical and biochemical parameters in patients with diabetes was performed. The total number of articles included in the present review is 25, which included 3 studies on type-1 diabetes and 22 studies on type-2 diabetes. There were 12 studies comparing the effects of Zinc supplementation on fasting blood glucose in patients with type-2 diabetes. The pooled mean difference in fasting blood glucose between Zinc supplemented and placebo groups was 18.13mg/dl (95%CI:33.85,2.41; p<0.05). 2-h post-prandial blood sugar also shows a similar distinct reduction in (34.87mg/dl [95%CI:75.44; 5.69]) the Zinc treated group. The reduction in HbA1c was 0.54% (95%CI:0.86;0.21) in the Zinc treated group. There were 8 studies comparing the effects of Zinc supplementation on lipid parameters in patients with type-2 diabetes. The pooled mean difference for total cholesterol between Zinc supplemented and placebo groups was 32.37mg/dl (95%CI:57.39,7.35; p<0.05). Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol also showed a similar distinct reduction in the Zinc treated group, the pooled mean difference from random effects analysis was 11.19mg/dl (95%CI:21.14,1.25; p<0.05). Studies h Continue reading >>

Do Zinc Depleted Pancreases Cause Type-1 Diabetes?

Do Zinc Depleted Pancreases Cause Type-1 Diabetes?

“Iron that replaces zinc and other minerals in the pancreas, adrenals and elsewhere can contribute to impaired blood sugar tolerance and diabetes,” says Dr. Wilson in his article Toxic Metals and Detoxification. My type-1 diabetic wife and I have been studying the theories behind Dr. Wilson’s Nutritional Balancing Science. It has been the next step in our quest to save Nicole’s life. As I understand Nutritional Balancing, it theorizes that the wrong minerals in the wrong places in the body cause most diseases. Dr. Wilson suggests that instead of zinc the pancreases of type-1 diabetics may sometimes be overloaded with iron. Writing about high-iron or bronze diabetes, Dr. Wilson says in his article Diabetes, A 21st Century Epidemic: Iron replaces zinc and other metals in the pancreas and the blood sugar starts to rise. It can easily become over 400 mg/dL and this type can be a so-called brittle diabetes, in that it can be hard to control. Low zinc can predispose one to iron, copper and other toxic metal poisoning that can affect the pancreas and other organs. Lack of zinc may not sound like a likely reason for islet cell failure. Nonetheless the Journal of the American College of Nutrition (1998) states: “[Zinc] plays a clear role in the synthesis, storage and secretion of insulin…” Not only that, but the zinc in insulin may be critical to stopping blood sugar from rising between meals. This week I found a study involving lots of rats published by the American Diabetes Association (2007) from Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Washington. When these diabetic rats were given zinc-free insulin they continued to produce glucagon unceasingly. (Glucagon stimulates the liver to release stored sugar into the bloodstream.) So the zinc in insulin stops Continue reading >>

Zinc Deficiency And Its Association With Diabetes

Zinc Deficiency And Its Association With Diabetes

Zinc Deficiency And Its Association With Diabetes This is an Excerpt from diabetes book, "Reverse Your Type 2 Diabetes, Scientifically. " Copyright All rights reserved. We are facing an Epidemic of Zinc Deficiency with its horrendous health consequences. Zinc is an essential trace element that exists in all cells and is required by thousands of chemical reactions in the body. Zinc is involved in the synthesis, storage and secretion of insulin, as well as insulin action. Zinc is also a strong antioxidant. Several animal studies have shown Zinc deficiency to be associated with high risk of Type 2 as well as Type 1 diabetes, but there are very few human studies. In one such study (1), researchers investigated the relationship between dietary intake of Zinc, and diabetes and coronary artery disease in 1769 rural individuals and 1806 urban individuals in . The authors concluded that low dietary zinc was associated with an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, and coronary artery disease in urban subjects only. In another study (2), "Nurses' Health Study," in which 82,297 women in the were followed for 24 years, researchers concluded that higher Zinc intake may be associated with a slightly lower risk of Type 2 diabetes in women. In addition to low dietary intake, Type 2 diabetics also have increased urinary loss of Zinc if their diabetes is not controlled. Can Zinc Supplementation Help Type 2 Diabetes? In an animal study (3), researchers gave Zinc orally to Type 2 diabetic mice for 4 weeks. They observed a significant improvement in blood glucose level as well as a reduction in insulin resistance. In addition, Zinc treatment caused weight loss and a decrease in high blood pressure (hypertension) in these mice. In another study (4), Zinc supple Continue reading >>

From The Cover: Zinc Deficiency Worsens And Supplementation Prevents High-fat Diet Induced Vascular Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, And Pathological Remodeling

From The Cover: Zinc Deficiency Worsens And Supplementation Prevents High-fat Diet Induced Vascular Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, And Pathological Remodeling

From the Cover: Zinc Deficiency Worsens and Supplementation Prevents High-Fat Diet Induced Vascular Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Pathological Remodeling *Department of Endocrinology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xian Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Xian 710061, China Chinese-American Research Institute for Diabetic Complications, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and School of Nursing, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325035, China Kosair Childrens Hospital Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 Search for other works by this author on: Kosair Childrens Hospital Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 Center of Cardiovascular Disease, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130000, China Search for other works by this author on: Kosair Childrens Hospital Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 Department of Nephrology, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130000, China Search for other works by this author on: Center of Cardiovascular Disease, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130000, China Search for other works by this author on: Kosair Childrens Hospital Research Institute, Department of Pediatrics, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 School of Biomedicine, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610500, China Search for other works by this author on: |Department of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, SPHIS, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40202; Search for other works by this author on: Chinese-American Research Institute for Diabetic Complications, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and School of Nursing, Continue reading >>

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