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Zinc And Diabetes Type 1

Effects Of Zinc Supplementation In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Effects Of Zinc Supplementation In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Karine Cavalcanti Maurcio de Sena-Evangelista Metabolic syndrome (MS) involves pathophysiological alterations that might compromise zinc status. The aim of this study was to evaluate zinc status biomarkers and their associations with cardiometabolic factors in patients with MS. Our case control study included 88 patients with MS and 37 controls. We performed clinical and anthropometric assessments and obtained lipid, glycemic, and inflammatory profiles. We also evaluated zinc intake, plasma zinc, erythrocyte zinc, and 24-h urinary zinc excretion. The average zinc intake was significantly lower in the MS group (p < 0.001). Regression models indicated no significant differences in plasma zinc concentration (all p > 0.05) between the two groups. We found significantly higher erythrocyte zinc concentration in the MS group (p < 0.001) independent from co-variable adjustments. Twenty-four hour urinary zinc excretion was significantly higher in the MS group (p = 0.008), and adjustments for age and sex explained 21% of the difference (R 2 = 0.21, p < 0.001). There were significant associations between zincuria and fasting blood glucose concentration (r = 0.479), waist circumference (r = 0.253), triglyceride concentration (r = 0.360), glycated hemoglobin concentration (r = 0.250), homeostatic model assessmentinsulin resistance (r = 0.223), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration (r = 0.427) (all p < 0.05) in the MS group. Patients with MS had alterations in zinc metabolism mainly characterized by an increase in erythrocyte zinc and higher zincuria. Diabetes mellitus is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with an estimated 346 million adults being affected in year 2011. The prevalence is expected to double between years 20252030. Some of the miner Continue reading >>

Zinc Benefits For Diabetes: Natural Blood Sugar Control And More

Zinc Benefits For Diabetes: Natural Blood Sugar Control And More

I take zinc when I feel a cold coming on and find that it definitely helps to keep me from getting sick. Many people use zinc for this immune-boosting purpose, but zinc benefits can do more for your body than just that. The benefits of taking zinc include lowering your risk of heart disease, treating Parkinson’s disease, and even helping clear up acne. As if that weren’t enough, yet another reason to love zinc is that it can be helpful for diabetes care. Zinc is highly concentrated in the islet cells of the pancreas, where insulin is produced.[1] Zinc benefits include promoting healthy insulin function, providing natural blood sugar control, and might even help to prevent diabetes in the first place. Zinc Benefits and Insulin Laboratory studies have shown that zinc acts like insulin when administered to insulin-sensitive tissue and that it seems to stimulate insulin action.[1] It binds to insulin receptors, activates insulin signaling pathways, and more, all of which result in glucose uptake by cells and clearance of glucose from the blood.[2] Zinc is also necessary for the correct processing, storage, and secretion of insulin,[1] and it can protect against β-cell loss, a hallmark of diabetes.[3] Because zinc is so closely tied to insulin functioning, zinc deficiency is associated with poor β-cell function and higher incidences of insulin resistance.[3] Reduced Zinc Levels Seen in Diabetic Patients It is not surprising then, to learn that low zinc levels are often associated with diabetes. One study found that prediabetic individuals are more likely to be zinc deficient, and that at any given body mass index (BMI), people with lower zinc levels are more insulin resistant than those with higher zinc levels.[3] Multiple studies have found high rates of zinc deficien Continue reading >>

Scientists Prove The Role Of Zinc In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Scientists Prove The Role Of Zinc In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Researchers from RUDN University and P. G. Demidov Yaroslavl State University have demonstrated an association between changes in the concentration of trace elements in blood (especially zinc) with prediabetes. The obtained data suggest that zinc metabolism disorders play an important role in the development of diabetes. The results of the study were published in Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. The one of the most important risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes is age over 45 years. Women are especially vulnerable in postmenopause, the final stage of menopause, due to serious hormonal changes. 180 healthy and pre-diabetic representatives of this group were enrolled in the study. "The study was based on the existing data on the role of individual trace elements (zinc, chromium, vanadium) in the insulin signal transduction. At the same time, it is believed that a number of toxic metals (cadmium, mercury) contribute to the development of insulin resistance (insulin resistance of tissues to the insulin signaling) and subsequently diabetes mellitus type 2," says Alexey A. Tinkov, the one of the authors of the article from RUDN University. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease, affecting up to 6 percent of the worldwide population. There is an increase in blood glucose because tissues are unable to "grab" and utilize it. The main feature of this type of diabetes is the fact that the pancreas produces enough insulin, the hormone that makes body cells absorb glucose from blood, but the tissues do not respond to its signals. Whether the disorders of trace element metabolism serve as the cause of insulin resistance is not yet well understood. New experimental data from RUDN University scientists suggest that a certain connection Continue reading >>

Type-1 Diabetes & Zinc, Magnesium And Chromium By Berkson

Type-1 Diabetes & Zinc, Magnesium And Chromium By Berkson

TYPE-1 DIABETES & ZINC, MAGNESIUM AND CHROMIUM by Berkson Posted by Dr. Devaki Lindsey Berkson | Jan 21, 2016 | Berkson's Blogs | Chromium, zinc, and magnesium are involved in insulin signaling and how the body deals with sugar. They promote helpful defense against adverse oxidation, for example, from tissue damage from high blood sugars. In this study review, blood levels of trace elements (especially magnesium and zinc) were found to be lower in type-1 human diabetes patients than in controls. They were even lower in type 1-diabetes patients with poor glycemic control (hard to control blood sugar levels). Animal studies in the past have repeatedly shown that chromium and magnesium supplementation stopped diabetes-induced complications and improved blood sugar control. When is the last time your diabetologist spoke to you about testing for these minerals, or supplementing with these minerals, or assessing digestion of these minerals? Didnt think so! MORAL OF THIS STORY: Keep an intelligent eye on your kids nutrient status (and digestion/food reactivitys) to prevent future disease as well as decrease complications from present illnesses. Regular serum testing doesnt cut the butter. Asses digestion needed to absorb these minerals. Rule out food reactivitys that block absorption of these minerals and contribute to leaky gut, which can worsen outcomes. Conclusion: The supplementation of type-1 diabetes patients with zinc, magnesium, and chromium may help to control diabetes and prevent diabetes-related oxidative injuries. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2015 Sep 24 Continue reading >>

Po-0051zinc And Copper Disorders In Children With Diabetes Type 1 | Archives Of Disease In Childhood

Po-0051zinc And Copper Disorders In Children With Diabetes Type 1 | Archives Of Disease In Childhood

PO-0051 Zinc And Copper Disorders In Children With Diabetes Type 1 PO-0051 Zinc And Copper Disorders In Children With Diabetes Type 1 1Pediatrics and Neonatology, Mother-Child University Hospital Tlemcen, Tlemcen, Algeria 2University of Tlemcen, Laboratory of Applied Molecular Biology and Immunology, Tlemcen, Algeria 3University of Tlemcen, Department of Pediatrics, Tlemcen, Algeria Background and aims Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that results from the progressive and selective destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Trace elements have a key role as well as in adaptive immunity in inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to measure circulating levels of Zinc (Zn), Copper (Cu), and protein fractions in patients with T1D. Methods Sixty (60) subjects aged less than 15 years, divided into two similar groups (30 with recently type 1 diabetes and 30 controls) were recruited in the Department of Paediatrics of Tlemcen University Hospital. Zinc and copper were measured by polarimetry. The protein fractions were measured by zone electrophoresis on cellulose acetate (PFIC, serum protein electrophoresis) (HELENA, USA). Results Serum Zn and Cu levels were significantly elevated in type 1 diabetes compared with controls (respectively, p = 0.001, p = 0.002). 0,05)." >However, the percentage of alpha -1, alpha -2, beta and gamma globulins, and the total rate of serum globulins were identical in the two groups (p > 0.05). Conversely, the percentage of albumin and albumin/globulin ratio were significantly decreased in type 1 diabetes compared with controls (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion Disorders Zn and Cu could be significant immunological abnormalities and inflammatory signs at the beginning of the installation of T1D. Continue reading >>

Fight Diabetes With The Power Of Zinc

Fight Diabetes With The Power Of Zinc

(NewsTarget) Diabetes is an escalating issue in the United States, and there are no signs of this health ailment diminishing. According to the American Diabetes Association, 23.6 million adults and children have diabetes in the U.S. That is 7.8% of the population according to the latest data formed from 2007, and 1.6 million new cases are diagnosed each year. Luckily, there are many natural remedies that may aid in suppressing the negative effects of diabetes. Many of these remedies may completely cure or prevent diabetes when used properly. Research shows that zinc, an essential trace element responsible for over 300 enzyme functions, can aid in normalizing the negative effects of diabetes mellitus. According to the study, zinc has been shown to mitigate the harmful effects of diabetes by improving glycemic control in type I and type II diabetes. Many of the enzyme systems in which zinc is a necessity for are involved with the metabolism of blood sugar, and therefore make zinc a natural catalyst for insulin secretion. The pancreas is an endocrine gland responsible for producing hormones like glucagon, somatostatin, and - you guessed it - insulin. The beta cells that secrete insulin in your pancreas are also highly stored with zinc. Without the high concentrations of zinc, the beta cells suffer. Luckily, beta cells are equipped with their own special transporter called 'zinc transporter 8', which makes it easy for the beta cells to store the zinc. However, it is known that any metamorphosis of the genes in the zinc transporter 8 causes type 2 diabetes. It is also now known that antibodies against the zinc transporter are present in type 1 diabetic patients, which means that these antibodies are associated with type 1 diabetes. It is no wonder why zinc is as popular as i Continue reading >>

Zinc Supplementation For The Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Zinc Supplementation For The Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Review question What are the effects of zinc supplementation compared with placebo or no treatment for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults with insulin resistance? Background Some studies have shown that zinc improves glucose levels (glycaemic control) in people with diabetes. As a consequence of diabetes long-term complications may develop, such as kidney, nerve and eye disease. Also, the risk of cardiovascular complications like heart attacks and strokes is raised. Type 1 diabetes is a form of diabetes where the body cannot produce insulin any more. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases with age, obesity and lack of physical activity and is characterised by an increasing inability of the body to make good use of insulin (insulin resistance). The mineral zinc plays a key role in the action of insulin and theoretically zinc supplementation used by people with insulin resistance could prevent the onset of diabetes. Study characteristics We included three randomised controlled studies with a total of 128 participants in this review. The duration of zinc supplementation ranged between four and 12 weeks. Key results No study reported on our patient-important key outcomes (new onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, side effects, health-related quality of life, all-cause mortality, diabetic complications, socioeconomic effects). The effects of zinc supplementation are uncertain regarding insulin resistance and lipid levels in the blood (mainly cholesterol and triglycerides). Quality of evidence The overall quality of the included studies was unclear because study authors did not provide important information for us to judge how the studies were performed (unclear risk of bias in most cases). In addition, the number of studies and participants is low and the stu Continue reading >>

6 Essential Minerals For Diabetics

6 Essential Minerals For Diabetics

If you are diabetic, there are many treatment options available, and supplements to try. However, help for diabetes may be closer than you think. These 6 essential minerals can fight the symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Minerals are an essential part of the human body. Minerals are just as vital as vitamins in keeping your body healthy and happy. In fact, mineral deficiencies can lead to a host of health problems, including an increased chance of diabetes. If you have diabetes, ensuring your diet is rich in the following minerals will help you restore balance to your body and reduce the need for diabetes medications. Combined with other natural treatments for diabetes, you may find that you no longer suffer from diabetes side effects at all. Before taking any of these supplements, consult with a health professional to identify their potential risks and benefits in your particular case. Chromium Chromium is a well-documented mineral that can help prevent and help with controlling blood sugar levels in existing diabetes. Chromium is also essential for the population of insulin receptors, for binding insulin to cells, and for increasing the utilization of glucose. While high doses of the mineral can be toxic, small dosage amounts have been shown to help diabetics with type 2 diabetes. Some studies have indicated that chromium picolinate may be more effective than other forms of chromium in supplements, as it is easier for the body to absorb and use. What It Does According to studies, chromium can enhance the effects of insulin. Deficiencies in chromium impair blood glucose control. In several studies, it was shown that those with diabetes have abnormally low chromium levels. The trace mineral may be able to reduce insulin levels and improve the lipid profile in Continue reading >>

Effects Of Zinc Supplementation On Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Effects Of Zinc Supplementation On Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Go to: The number of people with diabetes and pre-diabetes are exponentially increasing. Studies on humans have shown the beneficial effects of Zinc supplementation in patients with diabetes. The present study aims to systematically evaluate the literature and meta-analyze the effects of Zinc supplementation on diabetes. A systematic review of published studies reporting the effects of Zinc supplementations on diabetes mellitus was undertaken. The literature search was conducted in the following databases; PubMed, Web of Science and SciVerse Scopus. A meta-analysis of studies examining the effects of Zinc supplementation on clinical and biochemical parameters in patients with diabetes was performed. The total number of articles included in the present review is 25, which included 3 studies on type-1 diabetes and 22 studies on type-2 diabetes. There were 12 studies comparing the effects of Zinc supplementation on fasting blood glucose in patients with type-2 diabetes. The pooled mean difference in fasting blood glucose between Zinc supplemented and placebo groups was 18.13mg/dl (95%CI:33.85,2.41; p<0.05). 2-h post-prandial blood sugar also shows a similar distinct reduction in (34.87mg/dl [95%CI:75.44; 5.69]) the Zinc treated group. The reduction in HbA1c was 0.54% (95%CI:0.86;0.21) in the Zinc treated group. There were 8 studies comparing the effects of Zinc supplementation on lipid parameters in patients with type-2 diabetes. The pooled mean difference for total cholesterol between Zinc supplemented and placebo groups was 32.37mg/dl (95%CI:57.39,7.35; p<0.05). Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol also showed a similar distinct reduction in the Zinc treated group, the pooled mean difference from random effects analysis was 11.19mg/dl (95%CI:21.14,1.25; p<0.05). Studies h Continue reading >>

Zinc Deficiency And Its Association With Diabetes

Zinc Deficiency And Its Association With Diabetes

Zinc Deficiency And Its Association With Diabetes This is an Excerpt from diabetes book, "Reverse Your Type 2 Diabetes, Scientifically. " Copyright All rights reserved. We are facing an Epidemic of Zinc Deficiency with its horrendous health consequences. Zinc is an essential trace element that exists in all cells and is required by thousands of chemical reactions in the body. Zinc is involved in the synthesis, storage and secretion of insulin, as well as insulin action. Zinc is also a strong antioxidant. Several animal studies have shown Zinc deficiency to be associated with high risk of Type 2 as well as Type 1 diabetes, but there are very few human studies. In one such study (1), researchers investigated the relationship between dietary intake of Zinc, and diabetes and coronary artery disease in 1769 rural individuals and 1806 urban individuals in . The authors concluded that low dietary zinc was associated with an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, and coronary artery disease in urban subjects only. In another study (2), "Nurses' Health Study," in which 82,297 women in the were followed for 24 years, researchers concluded that higher Zinc intake may be associated with a slightly lower risk of Type 2 diabetes in women. In addition to low dietary intake, Type 2 diabetics also have increased urinary loss of Zinc if their diabetes is not controlled. Can Zinc Supplementation Help Type 2 Diabetes? In an animal study (3), researchers gave Zinc orally to Type 2 diabetic mice for 4 weeks. They observed a significant improvement in blood glucose level as well as a reduction in insulin resistance. In addition, Zinc treatment caused weight loss and a decrease in high blood pressure (hypertension) in these mice. In another study (4), Zinc supple Continue reading >>

Do Zinc Depleted Pancreases Cause Type-1 Diabetes?

Do Zinc Depleted Pancreases Cause Type-1 Diabetes?

“Iron that replaces zinc and other minerals in the pancreas, adrenals and elsewhere can contribute to impaired blood sugar tolerance and diabetes,” says Dr. Wilson in his article Toxic Metals and Detoxification. My type-1 diabetic wife and I have been studying the theories behind Dr. Wilson’s Nutritional Balancing Science. It has been the next step in our quest to save Nicole’s life. As I understand Nutritional Balancing, it theorizes that the wrong minerals in the wrong places in the body cause most diseases. Dr. Wilson suggests that instead of zinc the pancreases of type-1 diabetics may sometimes be overloaded with iron. Writing about high-iron or bronze diabetes, Dr. Wilson says in his article Diabetes, A 21st Century Epidemic: Iron replaces zinc and other metals in the pancreas and the blood sugar starts to rise. It can easily become over 400 mg/dL and this type can be a so-called brittle diabetes, in that it can be hard to control. Low zinc can predispose one to iron, copper and other toxic metal poisoning that can affect the pancreas and other organs. Lack of zinc may not sound like a likely reason for islet cell failure. Nonetheless the Journal of the American College of Nutrition (1998) states: “[Zinc] plays a clear role in the synthesis, storage and secretion of insulin…” Not only that, but the zinc in insulin may be critical to stopping blood sugar from rising between meals. This week I found a study involving lots of rats published by the American Diabetes Association (2007) from Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Washington. When these diabetic rats were given zinc-free insulin they continued to produce glucagon unceasingly. (Glucagon stimulates the liver to release stored sugar into the bloodstream.) So the zinc in insulin stops Continue reading >>

Zinc Supplementation In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Zinc Supplementation In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Does zinc supplementation affect glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes? A lack of zinc has been associated with a number of chronic disorders, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Because zinc may affect glucose levels in both humans and animals, a team led by researchers in the School of Molecular Bioscience at the University of Sydney in Australia explored the effects of taking zinc supplements on the management of diabetes. Their study, “Zinc and glycemic control: A meta-analysis of randomized placebo controlled supplementation trials in humans,” was published online ahead of print in November 2012. It appears in the Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. To gauge the effects of zinc supplementation on patients’ fasting blood glucose levels, HbA1c, serum zinc concentration, and serum insulin levels, the researchers conducted a meta-analysis of randomized trials. The analysis included 14 studies published before July 2011, and it compiled data on 3,978 participants. The results showed that there was a small but significant reduction in patients’ fasting glucose when they took zinc supplements. Additionally, HbA1c levels generally decreased in the patients who took zinc, compared to those who did not, while patients’ plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly following supplementation. The researchers did not find significant effects in serum insulin concentrations. The study authors conducted secondary analyses of the effects of zinc supplementation in patients with chronic metabolic disease, including type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. They found that patients who were living with chronic diseases showed larger decreases in glucose concentrations after taking zinc than patients without Continue reading >>

Vitamins And Minerals

Vitamins And Minerals

Tweet Depending on the type of treatment regimen you use to control your diabetes, there are some vitamins and minerals that may be beneficial for your condition. Before adding any vitamins or adding dietary supplements to your daily diet, discuss these changes with your healthcare team and doctor to ensure they are safe alongside any prescribed medication you're on. ALA and GLA ALA (alpha-lipoic acid) is a versatile and potent antioxidant, and may function to help diabetic neuropathy and reduce pain from free-radical damage. Also, some studies link ALA to decreased insulin resistance and thus the control of blood sugar. GLA (gamma-lipoic acid) is another naturally occurring antioxidant that is present in evening primrose oil, borage oil and blackcurrant seed oil. GLA may improve the function of nerves damaged by diabetic neuropathy. Biotin Biotin works in synergy with insulin in the body, and independently increases the activity of the enzyme glucokinase. Glucokinase is responsible for the first step of glucose utilisation, and is therefore an essential component of normal bodily functioning. Glucokinase occurs only in the liver, and in sufferers from diabetes its concentration may be extremely low. Supplements of biotin may have a significant effect on glucose levels for both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Carnitine (L-Carnitine, Acetyl L-Carnitine) Carnitine is required by the body in order to correctly use body fat in the production of energy. It is naturally occurring and derives from hydrophilic amino acids. Diabetics who try carnitine generally respond well, and high levels of fat in the bloodstream (cholesterol and triglycerides) may fall fast. Carnitine helps to break down fatty acids in the body and binds acyl residues. For these reasons, it may be useful to pre Continue reading >>

Take Zinc If Your Diabetes Is High

Take Zinc If Your Diabetes Is High

If you are healthy, you may not need to take a zinc supplement. But if your health isn’t good enough, a new meta-analysis indicates that you probably need to take one. The study categorizes people with type 2 diabetes as “non-healthy.” The mineral zinc plays an important role in how our bodies use insulin and in the metabolism of carbohydrates. When non-healthy people take a zinc supplement, the new study found that they can “significantly reduce total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.” An earlier meta-analysis focused entirely on people with diabetes. It found that zinc helps us manage both our blood glucose and lipids better. The journal Nutrition and Metabolism published the new meta-analysis in 2015 as “Effects of Zinc supplementation on serum lipids.” Some of these same researchers published the earlier meta-analysis, “Effects of Zinc Supplementation on Diabetes Mellitus,” in the journal Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome in 2015. The full texts of both studies are free online. Low levels of zinc can be deadly One third of all the people in the world are deficient in zinc. Marginal zinc deficiency is common in developed countries, and severe zinc deficiency is common in developing countries. It is a major factor contributing to the deaths of 1.4 percent of people worldwide. It is associated with diabetes, cancer, and many other diseases. The new meta-analysis reviewed and summarized the findings of 32 studies involving more than 14,000 people. The earlier meta-analysis of people who have diabetes included three studies of people with type 1 and 22 studies of people with type 2 diabetes. The earlier study was the first and apparently the only meta-analysis of zinc supplementation for people with diabetes. How much zinc to take You ne Continue reading >>

Effects Of Zinc Supplementation In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes.

Effects Of Zinc Supplementation In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes.

Biol Trace Elem Res. 2005 Summer;105(1-3):1-9. Effects of zinc supplementation in patients with type 1 diabetes. Department of Nutrition, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, UFRN, Av. Cordeiro de Farias s/n- Petrpolis, Natal-RN, 59010-180, Brazil. The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of oral zinc supplementation in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) on metabolic control and zinc blood concentrations. The sample consisted of 20 patients with T1DM and a control group (n=17). Metabolic control was evaluated by glycemia at fast, 24 h glycosuria, and HbA1c. Zinc concentrations were measured in plasma and erythrocytes. After the first collection of biological material, oral zinc supplementation was initiated and continued for 4 mo in T1MD patients (T1). Daily dosages were established based on Dietary Recommended Intakes (DRIs), considering zinc intake based on data from other studies previously performed with this population. All analyses were repeated after supplementation (T2). Metabolic control was unsatisfactory, with an HbA1c increase at T2. There was no difference in zinc concentrations in plasma and erythrocytes between patients with T1DM and control. Zinc concentrations in plasma were within the normal range in T1MD before and after supplementation and the control. Zinc concentrations in erythrocyte presented lower than normal values for all groups. A zinc increase in erythrocyte after supplementation was observed in T1DM patients, although without statistical significance. More studies are needed to confirm oral zinc supplementation as nutritional management in diabetes. Continue reading >>

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