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Will Caffeine Raise Blood Sugar

Does Coffee Raise Blood Pressure? Time To Clarify The Confusion

Does Coffee Raise Blood Pressure? Time To Clarify The Confusion

Coffee is one of the world’s most popular drinks. Taste and social value aside, it’s generally considered a health food and is linked to numerous metabolic health benefits. However, there is a lot of confusion around its impact on blood pressure. Many foods are shown to be beneficial, but does coffee raise blood pressure? Is there more to consider if you already have high blood pressure? This article digs through the current research to clarify any confusion. Caffeine has an immediate, short-term impact on blood pressure Coffee is the most popular hot beverage in the Americas, Australia and most of Europe. As coffee beans contain caffeine, that makes coffee our biggest source of caffeine. Caffeine is a psychoactive drug that stimulates the release of certain hormones in the brain (1). This is why coffee gives us an energy “kick”. Caffeine also gives a “kick” to our blood pressure, and is actually a well-documented pressor (substance that elevates blood pressure). Increases tend to be mild, in the range of 5 to 10 mmHg. That’s regardless of how often you drink coffee or your caffeine tolerance, although there are always rare exceptions (2). Caffeine appears to have a greater pressor effect on those with elevated blood pressure compared to those with normal blood pressure. And those effects are not suppressed by the use of blood pressure lowering medications (3, 4). Coffee is sounding pretty grim right now, but caffeine only appears to elevate blood pressure for about 3 hours before the effect subsides (5). So what does this mean for our health in the long run? Summary: Drinking coffee immediately increases blood pressure, regardless of your caffeine tolerance. The effect typically only lasts for a maximum of 3 hours though. Observational studies on caffeine Continue reading >>

How Does Diet Soda Affect Diabetes?

How Does Diet Soda Affect Diabetes?

Many of us who enjoy fizzy drinks select diet soda as a healthier option than the normal soda. Even if we have with diabetes, we feel that diet soda has less sugar and is therefore not harmful to us. Sadly, that’s not entirely true. Let’s find out how does diet soda affect diabetics. Pros of Drinking Diet Soda with Diabetes: Diet soda contains artificial sweeteners, which are also referred to as non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) or non-caloric sweeteners. They have a higher intensity of sweetness per gram than caloric sweeteners like sucrose. Popular artificial sweeteners like aspartame, acesulfame-K, neotame, saccharin, and sucralose are regulated as food additives by the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). Aspartame and saccharin, commonly found in diet sodas, are both FDA reviewed and approved. Besides FDA, most sweeteners used in diet sodas are approved by World Health Organization (WHO) and/ or Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI). The American Diabetes Association (ADA) lists diet soda as safe for diabetics to consume. Diet soda is typically sweetened with one of five artificial sweeteners. These sweeteners do not contain calories (or have less than 20 calories), and the ADA reports that they do not cause a blood glucose reaction. Furthermore, carbohydrate content in diet soda is less (less than 5 gm) when compared to that of regular soda. Also, the calorie content in diet soda is less than that of regular soda. Risks Of Diet Soda For Diabetics According to Mayo Clinic, a nonprofit medical practice and medical research group based in Rochester, Minnesota, while the artificial sweeteners may not raise blood sugar, the caffeine in it might. A 2004 study at Duke University showed that caffeine consumption can increase blood sugar levels by up to Continue reading >>

Does Black Coffee Affect Blood Sugar, Prevent Diabetes?

Does Black Coffee Affect Blood Sugar, Prevent Diabetes?

A few studies have indicated that drinking black coffee is somehow related to a lesser risk of developing diabetes mellitus. You may have seen one of these articles presented on a recent Good Mourning America show which said that drinking black coffee at lunch correlated with lower levels of developing diabetes. But the study went on to state that drinking coffee in the morning or at night time did not have the same affect. So let me get this right, black coffee can help prevent diabetes, but only if drank at midday? I guess you could label me skeptical about these findings. The problem with most of the studies, especially with coffee, is that the results are all over the map. It seems as if one week there will be news of a story suggesting that coffee is good for you in one way or another, and the next week there will be another study proclaiming the exact opposite. It’s hard for the average Joe to understand what the truth is because the truth seems to be constantly changing. That is because at the current time we really don’t know the truth about coffee and how it relates to diabetes, we are just piecing together information as we go. Each of these studies provides one snapshot that needs to be taken together to provide a big picture understanding of the subject. The problem with this particular subject however, is that the results are all over the map. The truth is that some people find that black coffee helps to lower their blood sugar levels, and other people find that it adversely raises them. Although many blanket statements can be made about diabetes, not all people react to the same food in the same way. The only way to know for sure is to drink coffee or any other food, and then test your blood sugar levels yourself to know for sure. I personally happen t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Sufferers: Beware Of Caffeine

Diabetes Sufferers: Beware Of Caffeine

There's something about coffee that fights type 2 diabetes - but it isn't caffeine. Caffeine makes it hard for people with diabetes to control their blood sugar, new studies suggest. In the latest of these studies, Duke University researcher James D. Lane, Ph.D., and colleagues put continuous blood-sugar monitors on 10 people with type 2 diabetes. All were regular coffee drinkers averaging four cups a day, but they stopped drinking coffee during the experiment. On one day, each patient took a 250 mg caffeine capsule at breakfast and another 250 mg caffeine capsule at lunch. That's roughly the same as having them drink two cups of coffee at each meal. On another day, the same people got placebo pills with no caffeine in them. The result: On the days the patients took caffeine, their blood-sugar levels were 8 percent higher. And after every meal - including dinner - their blood sugar spiked higher than it did on the day they had no caffeine. "These are clinically significant blood-sugar elevations due to caffeine," Lane tells WebMD. "Caffeine increases blood glucose by as much as oral diabetes medications decrease it. ... It seems the detrimental effects of caffeine are as bad as the beneficial effects of oral diabetes drugs are good." Lane warns against reading too much into this small, 10-patient study. But he says it does show that caffeine has real effects on the everyday lives of people with diabetes. "For people with diabetes, drinking coffee or consuming caffeine in other beverages may make it harder for them to control their glucose," he says. Diabetes, Coffee, and Caffeine Several studies have found that coffee drinkers - especially those who drink a lot of coffee - have a lower risk of diabetes than do other people. So how can coffee both protect against diabete Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Raise Blood Sugar Levels Diabetics

Does Caffeine Raise Blood Sugar Levels Diabetics

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The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

Is coffee good or bad for diabetes? Some studies show that coffee is protective, while others say it’s harmful. Some say decaf is better; others say it’s worse. Let’s try to sort this out. For years, various studies have reported that coffee drinkers are less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. A recent UCLA study found that “women who drink at least four cups of coffee a day are less than half as likely to develop diabetes as non-coffee drinkers.” Lead scientist Simin Liu said that coffee may improve the body’s tolerance to glucose by increasing metabolism or lowering insulin resistance. In 2008, Diabetes Self-Management blogger Amy Campbell reported on several other studies showing benefits for coffee. A study published in Diabetes Care in 2006 followed about 900 adults, roughly 300 of whom had prediabetes, for eight years. The people who drank caffeinated coffee had a 60% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who didn’t drink coffee. Another Diabetes Care study published the same year looked at more than 88,000 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. It found that women who drank two or more cups of coffee daily had a lower risk (slightly more than half the risk) of getting diabetes than those who drank just one cup of coffee daily, or no coffee at all. And it didn’t matter whether the coffee was regular or decaf. So right there you have a disagreement about caffeine. Meanwhile, other studies have shown that coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, raises after-meal (postprandial) blood glucose levels up to 20% in people with diabetes. These studies have not been large but have received a lot of attention. In the most-reported study, from Duke University, ten subjects, all with diabetes, were tested — given either caffeine capsules or a placebo (inacti Continue reading >>

Why You Can Drink Coffee (or Not) Before A Blood Test

Why You Can Drink Coffee (or Not) Before A Blood Test

What is the latest thinking on avoiding coffee before a blood test? You have a problem. You must fast for 12 hours (overnight) before your blood test, but you have a real dependence on coffee or caffeine. You need that cup of caffeinated energy before you even walk out the door. Otherwise, grogginess, a headache and a general feeling of malaise may set in. May we suggest that you get up earlier than your usual coffee time and arrive at the laboratory as early as possible? The only problem is, many medical testing labs open at 8 a.m., well past the time most people are up and getting ready to take on the day. And the busiest time of the day for most labs is 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Avoiding coffee before a blood test Drinking coffee and eating are OK before some blood tests but not others, and some doctors say any black coffee at all before is OK even before a cholesterol test as long as you don’t add cream or sugar. Ask your doctor if you can drink coffee before a test. Blood work and coffee Mayo Clinic Medical Laboratories allows some drinking of coffeeup to two hours before some tests: Is having black coffee fasting? Doctors keep telling patients it is all right to have black coffee before fasting blood work (fasting sugar, fasting lipid panel). It depends to some extent on what test is being performed, but for many tests that require fasting, intake of non-carbohydrate containing liquids a few hours before testing will not impact results. We have worked here to make 1 standard definition of “fasting” that encompasses most test requirements. We allow clear liquids (water, black coffee) up until 2 hours before a test or procedure. The definition of fasting should be clarified for all procedures in your institution if possible. This article on Livestrong.com seems to con Continue reading >>

Splenda Raises Blood Sugar Levels And May Increase Diabetes Risk

Splenda Raises Blood Sugar Levels And May Increase Diabetes Risk

Watching your weight or just trying to reduce the amount of sugar you consume? Good for you! But what may not be so good is your habit of reaching for a yellow packet of Splenda to sweeten your coffee or tea…quenching your thirst with a diet soda…or having Splenda-sweetened cookies, ice cream or pudding when you want a sweet taste without the calories of sugar. What’s the problem? Even though this popular artificial sweetener doesn’t have calories the way real sugar does, Splenda can mess with your blood sugar levels, a new study shows…and that might put you at increased risk for diabetes. Researchers wanted to gauge the effects of sucralose (sold in the US as Splenda) on blood sugar and insulin levels. Study participants included 17 people who were obese but who were not diabetic and who had relatively normal insulin sensitivity (the ability of the body’s cells to recognize and respond to insulin)…and who did not regularly consume any type of artificial sweetener. All participants underwent glucose tolerance tests, the gold-standard measure of how the body handles sugar. The tests were done twice, about a week apart. One time, the participants drank plain water before the test…the other time, they drank water sweetened with about the same amount of sucralose as is in a 12-ounce diet soda. Results: Compared with their glucose tolerance test results after drinking plain water, after drinking the sucralose beverage, the participants had four types of bad readings on the test. These included… 12% higher peak blood glucose levels. 20% higher total insulin secretion. 22% faster insulin-secretion rate. 7% slower rate of clearing insulin from the blood. Why these results are troublesome: Higher blood levels of glucose and insulin increase the likelihood of de Continue reading >>

You May Want To Skip The Splenda

You May Want To Skip The Splenda

Before you sweeten your coffee with the contents of a little yellow packet, read this. A popular artificial sweetener known as sucralose and marketed as Splenda can adversely affect how some people metabolize sugar, according to a new study from researchers at Washington University in St. Louis. The study compared overweight people with normal sugar metabolism to see how they reacted when they were given either water or sucralose—about as much as is in one can of diet soda—to drink before a glucose challenge test, which involves drinking a glucose mixture and then having blood taken at multiple intervals. Researchers found a kind of insulin-and-blood-sugar roller-coaster scenario. People’s blood sugar levels peaked higher if they got sucralose, rather than water, before the glucose challenge test. Insulin levels also climbed higher. And, a few hours into the test, at the lowest blood sugar point, sucralose consumption led to lower blood sugar levels than did water, which can set the stage for carb cravings. “Everyone got the same amount of glucose, both times, but their bodies secreted much more insulin when they got sucralose first,” says M. Yanina Pepino, PhD, the study’s main researcher. Insulin is needed for the body to use sugar for energy, but too much is harmful, Dr. Pepino says. High blood levels of insulin keep fat from being broken down for energy, making it hard to lose weight. And chronically high insulin levels can lead to insulin resistance, a precursor to type-2 diabetes. Does that mean that people who drink diet soda all the time are setting themselves up for type-2 diabetes? No one knows, Dr. Pepino says. However, in two large population studies, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners (think all of those pastel packets at your local coffee Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

10 Surprising Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

When you first found out you had diabetes, you tested your blood sugar often to understand how food, activity, stress, and illness could affect your blood sugar levels. By now, you’ve got it figured out for the most part. But then—bam! Something makes your blood sugar zoom up. You try to adjust it with food or activity or insulin, and it dips really low. You’re on a rollercoaster no one with diabetes wants to ride. Knowledge is power! Look out for these surprising triggers that can send your blood sugar soaring: Sunburn—the pain causes stress, and stress increases blood sugar levels. Artificial sweeteners—more research needs to be done, but some studies show they can raise blood sugar. Coffee—even without sweetener. Some people’s blood sugar is extra-sensitive to caffeine. Losing sleep—even just one night of too little sleep can make your body use insulin less efficiently. Skipping breakfast—going without that morning meal can increase blood sugar after both lunch and dinner. Time of day—blood sugar can be harder to control the later it gets. Dawn phenomenon—people have a surge in hormones early in the morning whether they have diabetes or not. For people with diabetes, blood sugar can spike. Dehydration—less water in your body means a higher blood sugar concentration. Nose spray—some have chemicals that trigger your liver to make more blood sugar. Gum disease—it’s both a complication of diabetes and a blood sugar spiker. Watch out for other triggers that can make your blood sugar fall. For example, extreme heat can cause blood vessels to dilate, which makes insulin absorb more quickly and could lead to low blood sugar. If an activity or food or situation is new, be sure to check your blood sugar levels before and after to see how you respo Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes

Coffee And Diabetes

Tweet The effect of coffee on diabetes, when presented in the media can often be confusing. News stories can in the same week tout the benefits coffee can have on diabetes and shoot down coffee as being unhelpful for blood sugar levels. This doesn’t mean the articles are contradictory though. Put slightly more simply, coffee contains different chemicals, some of which have beneficial effects whereas others can have a less beneficial effect, such as caffeine which can impair insulin in the short term. Caffeine and blood sugar levels Regular high caffeine consumption, over a 4 week period, has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. [20] Whilst the researchers found a relationship between higher coffee consumption and lower sensitivity to insulin, they recognised that the rapid transition to having more coffee may have produced an atypical or emphasised response by the body. Benefits of coffee Coffee has been shown to lower risks of the following conditions: Coffee contains polyphenols, which are a molecule that anti-oxidant properties which are widely believed to help prevent inflammatory illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes, and anticarcinogenic (anti-cancer) properties. As well as polyphenols, coffee contains the mineral magnesium and chromium. Greater magnesium intake has been linked with lower rates of type 2 diabetes. The blend of these nutrients can be helpful for improving insulin sensitivity, which may help to offset the opposite effects of caffeine. Coffee and prevention of diabetes Coffee and its effect on risks of developing type 2 diabetes have been studied a number of times and has indicated a notably lower risk of type 2 diabetes being associated with coffee drinkers. A 2009 study of 40,000 participants noted that consumptio Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis: Causes And Effects

Gastroparesis: Causes And Effects

A number of times throughout this book, you’ve come across the terms “delayed stomach-emptying” and “gastroparesis.” As I explained in Chapter 2, elevated blood sugars for prolonged periods can impair the ability of nerves to function properly. It’s very common that the nerves that stimulate the muscular activity, enzyme secretion, and acid production essential to digestion function poorly in long-standing diabetes. These changes affect the stomach, the gut, or both. Dr. Richard McCullum, a noted authority on digestion, has said that if a diabetic has any other form of neuropathy (dry feet, reduced feeling in the toes, diminished reflexes, et cetera), he or she will also experience delayed or erratic digestion. Slowed digestion can be fraught with unpleasant symptoms (rarely), or it may only be detectable when we review blood sugar profiles (commonly) or perform certain diagnostic tests. The picture is different for each of us. For more than twenty-five years, I suffered from many unpleasant symptoms myself. I eventually saw them taper off and vanish after thirteen years of essentially normal blood sugars. Some of the physical complaints possible (usually after meals) include burning along the midline of the chest (“heartburn”), belching, feeling full after a small meal (early satiety), bloating, nausea, vomiting, constipation, constipation alternating with diarrhea, cramps a few inches above the belly button, and an acid taste in the mouth. GASTROPARESIS: CAUSES AND EFFECTS Most of these symptoms, as well as effects upon blood sugar, relate to delayed stomach-emptying. This condition is called gastroparesis diabeticorum, which translates from the Latin as “weak stomach of diabetics.” It is believed that the major cause of this condition is neuropath Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Food Habits That Raise Your Blood Sugar

5 Surprising Food Habits That Raise Your Blood Sugar

Taking care of your blood sugar is one of the most valuable things you can do for your mood, weight, and even your heart health. It’s essential for keeping your body’s chemicals (a.k.a. your hormones) in check and also helps stabilize your appetite. If you’re having a hard time finding some balance with your blood sugar, and constantly hungry no matter what, or jittery and shaky, then it’s time to turn to some tips for taking care of your blood sugar ASAP! Surprisingly, it’s not just the sugary white stuff that raises your blood sugar, and not even the fruit in your diet like some might say. It can also be caused by other factors that you’ll want to be aware of when going throughout your day. Your blood sugar really boils down to your insulin (the sugar hormone, as many call it), which also stores fat and secrets glucose into the cells. Your insulin isn’t your enemy when you care for it. It can help keep your energy stable, but the key is to slow it down for a steady walk, not send it on a rollercoaster ride. Here are some things you might not realize affect your blood sugar: 1. Too Much Caffeine Caffeine also raises insulin when consumed in excess. While a cup (or even two cups) of coffee a day is actually beneficial for your insulin, more than that can cause it to sky-rocket. Even when consumed from healthier sources like yerba mate or black tea, caffeine can make your insulin surge, which leaves you moody, shaky, irritable, and craving sweets. Then you become tired and exhausted when levels drop, which leads you to reach for more caffeine or more sugar, depending on your vice. See how to Eat Your Way to Energy: No Caffeine Needed here if you need some help, or these 14 Natural Caffeine-Free Choices to Help Mellow You Out if you’re stressed. 2. Sugar W Continue reading >>

How Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar And The Risk Of Diabetes?

How Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar And The Risk Of Diabetes?

The average American drinks about 474ml (two 8oz cups) of coffee a day. This amount of coffee contains about 280mg of caffeine. You may drink more or less coffee, but this beverage is not the only source of caffeine you take. Other sources of caffeine include tea, energy drinks, chocolate, soda, and even some brands of ice-cream. But, what’s caffeine exactly? It is a stimulant found in some drinks and foods that accelerate the central nervous system. For most people caffeine doesn’t seem to affect blood glucose levels significantly. So, they can consume up to 400mg of caffeine per day without any side effect. However, when it comes to people with diabetes, caffeine shows a different reaction with their blood sugar levels. Diabetes and Caffeine Numerous studies show people with type 2 diabetes have different reactions to caffeine. Generally, it increases their insulin and blood sugar levels. One research involved people with the disease who received 250mg caffeine pill twice a day. Once at breakfast and another with their lunch. The amount of caffeine equals with that in 2 cups of coffee with each meal. The blood sugar levels of the participants were higher on days when they didn’t get caffeine by 8 percent. What’s more, their reading was increasing after each meal. These results are proof that caffeine has a significant impact on the body’s response to the hormone which lets sugar inside the cells and gets transformed into energy. This hormone is insulin. Caffeine can reduce your body’s sensitivity to insulin. In other words, the reaction of your cells to insulin is different in presence of caffeine. Your cells are no longer able to absorb the right amount of sugar from your blood after you’ve had your meals. This, in turn, increases your body’s producti Continue reading >>

5 Unusual Things That Drive Blood Sugar Through The Roof

5 Unusual Things That Drive Blood Sugar Through The Roof

back to Overview Of course, there are more than 5 things that send blood sugar soaring – that list is long! Ilka wrote about some things we often forget about, and I thought it would be good to take a fresh look at them again. Take it away, Ilka! Ilka Gdanietz: If I asked our team of diabetics what raises their blood sugars the most, I’d get as many different answers as there are people with diabetes on the team. Lots! Carbohydrates, a forgotten bolus … we know these things will shoot your sugar up quickly. The diabetes monster acts like a delicate flower sometimes, right? But there are also a bunch of things we never knew about, don’t think about in the moment, or simply forget. Here’s a small selection: Stress/excitement: You know the feeling. Whether it’s an appointment with the dentist, an argument with someone, or a jolt from a horror movie. Your body releases stress hormones like adrenaline and cortisol that do not get along with blood sugar at all. Stupidly, stressful situations often occur unexpectedly, and it’s hard to react to the blood sugar spike fast enough. Additionally, stress means something different for each of us, and we don’t react the same to the same situations. In my case, for example, the sight of a nasty hairy spider is enough to make my blood sugar spike. Scott had the same thing when he saw a spider! Medications: Certain medications can increase blood sugar. These include, for example, beta-blockers, diuretics, or steroids like cortisone. Which meds may do what, the treating physician should know. This interaction is why it’s important to be thorough on your medication lists when at the doctor’s office or hospital. Caffeine: Yes, your beloved coffee can raise your blood sugar. Of course, the amount of caffeine ingested play Continue reading >>

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