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Why My Blood Sugar Is High In The Morning?

Why Is My Blood Glucose So High In The Morning?

Why Is My Blood Glucose So High In The Morning?

I am puzzled by my blood sugar pattern. I am not on any medications. My morning fasting blood sugar is always the highest of the day—between 120 and 140 mg/dl. The rest of the day it is in the normal range. Why does this occur? Continue reading >>

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

If you’re a diabetic, you may find that your blood sugar levels are at their peak in the morning. This is due to the fasting period overnight. It’s common for blood sugar tests to require a period of fasting beforehand to get the best natural levels. You need to get your blood sugar levels down right away. The good news is you don’t necessarily need to rely on medication. While you will want to take medication in the way that your doctor has prescribed, you will still want to follow these seven-morning rituals. It is possible to reverse type II diabetes and focus on a healthier and more natural lifestyle. Even if you’re not a diabetic, you will want to keep your morning blood sugar levels down. Here are the seven must-follow morning rituals that have proven to lower the blood sugar levels on a morning completely naturally. Wait, Why Is Your Blood Sugar Up In the Morning? Why is it that your blood sugar levels will rise overnight? You don’t eat anything, so how can you possibly add any glucose to your system? Well, those who suffer from type II diabetes will find this is most problematic. The body still creates glucose throughout the night. It needs to, whether you’ve eaten something or not. This natural process is called gluconeogenesis, and there is nothing you can do to stop it – nor would you want to. In a healthy person, this process doesn’t cause a major problem. Those with diabetes will find the gluconeogenesis process is increased. That means your body produces more glucose naturally than it would if you were healthy. Let’s not forget that the stress hormone cortisol also plays a part. This increases slowly on a morning until it reaches a peak early in the morning. The cortisol will elevate the blood sugar levels, so you end up with naturally hi Continue reading >>

Why Is My Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is My Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

That early morning jump in your blood sugar? It's called the dawn phenomenon or the dawn effect. It usually happens between 2 and 8 a.m. But why? Generally, the normal hormonal changes your body makes in the morning will boost your blood sugar, whether you have diabetes or not. If you don't, your body just makes more insulin to balance everything out. You don't even notice that it's happening. But if you have diabetes, it's different. Since your body doesn't respond to insulin the same as most, your fasting blood sugar reading can go up, even if you follow a strict diet. The boost in sugar is your body's way of making sure you have enough energy to get up and start the day. If you have diabetes, your body may not have enough insulin to counteract these hormones. That disrupts the delicate balance that you work so hard to keep, and your sugar readings can be too high by morning. The effects of the dawn phenomenon can vary from person to person, even from day to day. Some researchers believe the natural overnight release of what are called counter-regulatory hormones -- like growth hormones, cortisol, glucagon and epinephrine -- makes your insulin resistance stronger. This will make your blood sugar go up. You may also have high blood sugar in the morning because: You didn't have enough insulin the night before. You took too much or too little medicine. You ate the wrong snack before bedtime. If the dawn phenomenon affects you, try to: Eat dinner earlier in the evening. Do something active after dinner, like going for a walk. Check with your health care provider about the medicine you’re taking. Eat breakfast. It helps bring your blood sugar back to normal, which tells your body that it's time to rein in the anti-insulin hormones. Eat a snack with some carbohydrates and Continue reading >>

Managing Morning Blood Sugar Highs: How To Treat The Top 3 Causes

Managing Morning Blood Sugar Highs: How To Treat The Top 3 Causes

A high blood sugar reading first thing in the morning can throw off your whole day — and signal a chronic problem. Despite their best efforts to control their blood sugar levels, some people simply wake up with elevated blood sugar. Starting your day this way isn't just alarming: If it becomes a pattern, high morning readings can make it difficult to achieve your long-term diabetes management goals. Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, a morning blood sugar high can be due to several causes. But with a little detective work and the help of your diabetes care team, you can isolate the cause and take steps to correct it. Here are three common scenarios: 1. The Dawn Phenomenon This occurs during the night while you're asleep and the body releases stress hormones. This phenomenon usually occurs between 3 a.m. and 8 a.m. and involves growth hormone, cortisol, and adrenaline, which trigger the production and release of glucose from your liver. The end result of this chemical cascade is an increase in blood sugar. “These hormones are designed to get us up and moving in the morning,” says endocrinologist Renee Amori, MD, assistant professor of medicine in the division of endocrinology at the Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia. While everybody experiences these natural changes in hormone levels, in people with diabetes the body may not adjust appropriately. This can lead to higher-than-normal blood sugar at the start of the day. Testing for these elevated first morning blood sugars is one way to diagnose people with type 2 diabetes. 2. The Somogyi Effect High morning readings can also be caused by the Somogyi effect, a rebound response that occurs when the body overcompensates for a low blood sugar reaction at night. If you take blood sugar–lowe Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

At the moment we are following Yvonne (a type 2 diabetic) on a 6-8 week journey to lower her blood sugar, a1c levels and hopefully cholesterol and other health markers. Yvonne has been sending me her blood sugar charts every few days and on those she always makes some notes for me. I noticed she had 3 big question marks (???) against one of her morning blood sugar results and then again on another morning when her blood sugar levels were high at 160 (mg/dl – or 8.9mmol/l) she had written: “I don’t understand. 97 (mg/dl – or 5.5mmol/l) last night when I went to sleep. I didn’t eat anything because I didn’t feel well. Humm.” So I thought this would be a good opportunity to provide some information on the question: Why is blood sugar high in the morning?? While you’re here be sure to subscribe for our type 2 diabetes updates Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Although it would seem like the body would have the lowest blood glucose in the morning this often isn’t the case for these 5 reasons. 1. Glucose Happens 24/7 All the cells in the body need glucose to fuel their function, even when we sleep. So the body breaks down stores in the liver so that the body and brain can continue to go about their functions. This glucose production will still occur when you don’t eat and in fact if you skip a meal it can increase the livers production of glucose. 2. Morning Hormones Raise Blood Glucose Cortisol (our stress hormone) is the hormone that slowly increases in levels from around 3 am onwards to reach it’s peak early in the morning. This occurs to get us moving and to give us energy. But cortisol stimulates a rise in blood sugar response so it is in fact a ‘normal’ response but if you are diabetic there is one factor that impacts both the overnight g Continue reading >>

A Simple Trick To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

A Simple Trick To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

If you’re type 2 diabetic, you may be wondering why your blood sugar is so high in the morning. Every other time you test, your levels seem to be within range… But those morning levels, sometimes they are sky high and it puts you in a panic, questioning what on earth you may be doing wrong. Firstly, stop panicking — morning rises are a common occurrence in diabetics. However, it is important to understand why it happens and what you can do about it… The dawn phenomenon Logically you’d think that your blood sugar reading should be at it’s lowest in the morning. After all, you’ve eaten nothing and done nothing but sleep. But regardless of whether you eat, glucose production continues anyway… The reason for this is your body’s cells need fuel for your heart to beat, your brain to work and your organs to keep functioning. When you don’t eat, or when you’re asleep, the body can break down stores of available glucose (glycogenolysis) or enter a process called gluconeogenesis — a process that can use non-carbohydrate stores such as amino acids to produce glucose. Various hormones such as glucagon, growth hormone and cortisol, are also involved in raising glucose levels. To wake you up every morning, your body naturally activates these hormones from around 3 am onwards, which explains why it’s called the dawn phenomenon. In people without diabetes, insulin would normally counteract these hormones to prevent excessive glucose production. But since the insulin response and insulin sensitivity are altered in diabetes, your body may not compensate effectively. The Somogyi effect There is another phenomenon called the “Somogyi effect” or “rebound hyperglycemia.” This is when your body’s glucose levels decrease during the night (nocturnal hypoglyce Continue reading >>

Correcting Morning Blood Sugar Highs — Know The Causes Of These Spikes And Ways To Treat Them

Correcting Morning Blood Sugar Highs — Know The Causes Of These Spikes And Ways To Treat Them

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 11 P. 18 Jill is frustrated. Her type 1 diabetes seems out of control, and she comes to your office at her wits’ end. She says she’s doing everything right: counting carbs, taking her insulin as prescribed, monitoring her blood glucose levels four times per day. A look at Jill’s testing logs and most recent blood work confirms there’s a problem. She has a hemoglobin A1c of 9.2, and her blood glucose levels are all over the map. Her numbers generally are fine before she goes to bed but incredibly high in the morning. Recently, her physician increased her nighttime basal insulin dose to counteract the morning highs, but things seem worse now than ever. Her breakfast bolus doesn’t seem to be effective, and her high blood glucose levels persist into the afternoon. “Fluctuating blood sugars can be very frustrating,” says Eileen M. Sturner, RD, LDN, CDE, BC-ADM. “RDs can play an important role in helping patients get to the bottom of problems such as morning highs. Working with patients to gather the appropriate data and facilitating the sharing of those data with the healthcare provider that’s managing their diabetes can have life-changing results.” Hyperglycemia In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas can no longer provide either the steady drip of basal insulin that keeps blood sugar levels stable between meals or the bolus release of insulin that directs the uptake of glucose after eating. Patients must take basal insulin to keep their fasting blood sugar levels steady and bolus insulin to match their carbohydrate intake and correct highs. The primary cause of hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetes is carbohydrate intake that isn’t matched with bolus insulin dosing. Perhaps Jill is underreporting her carbohydrate intake, administer Continue reading >>

Why Is My Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is My Sugar High In The Morning?

It can be very frustrating to check your blood sugar and find it is always high in the morning. Diabetes is a complicated condition. There are many different factors that contribute to worsening blood sugars, including diet, hormones, exercise and genetics. A high blood sugar in the early morning can be caused by several things. The common ones will be covered below. Insulin resistance in the liver: The two main hormones involved in blood sugar control and regulation are Insulin and Glucagon. Insulin pushes sugar into the cell, so it can be used or stored. Glucagon does the opposite of insulin. It frees sugar from storage in the liver, so the body can use it while you are fasting. A high blood sugar in the morning is one of the earliest changes people with diabetes experience. This is due to insulin resistance in the liver and high glucagon levels, which often occur in people with diabetes. The insulin the pancreas produces does not work well anymore, even though the pancreas is working overtime to produce more of it. Insulin resistance in the liver and elevated glucagon levels causes the liver to spill out extra sugar into the bloodstream while you are sleeping and fasting overnight. This raises your blood sugar levels. The Dawn Phenomenon: In the early morning, it is normal to have higher levels of cortisol and growth hormone. Both of these hormones help prepare you to wake up and start the day. Doctors often call this hormone increase the ‘Dawn phenomenon.’ Dawn phenomenon happens between 2 AM and 8 AM, and it also occurs in patients without diabetes. This natural hormone change helps to keep sugar in the blood while a person is fasting. In patients with diabetes, the Dawn phenomenon is more noticeable because of both insulin resistance and decreased levels of in Continue reading >>

High Morning Blood Sugar

High Morning Blood Sugar

by Mary (Sacramento, Ca.) QUESTION: I can go to bed at night and my blood sugar is 112 but in the morning its 157 and when I fast it goes up..why?? ANSWER: Hi Mary, To give an exact answer to your question, I need to know if you're a diabetic or not, your age and some of your lifestyle habits and foods you use to eat. Anyway, although I don't have all these information, I will try to give an explanation to your morning high blood sugar. If you think you're not a diabetic, you shouldn't exclude the possibility you might have diabetes. Here's what happens: If you go to bed with normal blood sugar levels, during night (exactly early in the morning 4-5 am) there are some substances (hormones) our body produces to wake us up. They are called "stress" hormones, which raise blood sugar levels. In a normal person, this rise is accompanied with increase in insulin levels too. As a consequence, a normal person is woken up without having high blood glucose. In a diabetic, this doesn't happen, especially for type 2 diabetics. Their body still produces a little of insulin, but the insulin is not able to transport the glucose inside the body cells. Thus, glucose remains in the bloodstream and diabetics they wake up with high blood sugar levels and high insulin levels (induced by high blood sugar). What you can do, you may check again your fasting blood sugar levels, do an oral glucose tolerance test and check your A1C level in a lab. In this way you'll make sure if you have diabetes or not and what precautions you must take. Hope I answered your question. Take care! Dr.Alba High Sugar level at the morning by: Anonymous COMMENT: I have the same problem, before bed, it is normal but when wake up in the morning, the blood sugar level rasies up to 144. I am not taking any medicine and th Continue reading >>

Why Is My Blood Sugar So High In The Morning?

Why Is My Blood Sugar So High In The Morning?

I have diabetes; I do not take insulin. I am trying to keep my blood sugar down by cutting all sugars but still always have a high reading in the morning ( 220); daytime reading can be 100 to 150..why is the morning reading so high? What would be the best foods for night? There are two main reasons that blood sugar levels may be higher in the morning. These are referred to as the “dawn phenomenon” and the “Somogyi effect”. The dawn phenomenon is the result of various changes that occur naturally in the body during sleep. It refers to increased glucose production and insulin resistance (approximately 3am-8am), which are brought on by the release of counterregulatory hormones (including cortisol, epinephrine, and glucagons). So, the release of these hormones to maintain and repair your body actually causes blood glucose to rise during the first hours of the morning. The Somogyi effect, or “rebound hyperglycemia”, can occur as a result of low blood sugar levels overnight. The hypoglycemia triggers the release of counterregulatory hormones, which increase blood glucose. It is thought that the Somogyi effect may be a result of poor diabetes management. For example, those taking insulin may have injected too much earlier, creating hypoglycemia with a “rebound” hyperglycemia to follow. I would recommend contacting your doctor to determine which of the above phenomenon may be causing your hyperglycemia in the morning. You will likely be asked to check your blood sugar levels every few hours from bedtime until morning. If blood sugar is normal or high during this time, the dawn phenomenon is likely occurring. If blood sugar is consistently low, the Somogyi effect is suspected. If your blood sugar is consistently high during the night (dawn phenomenon), I would mo Continue reading >>

Four Reasons For Morning High Blood Sugar Levels

Four Reasons For Morning High Blood Sugar Levels

Q: Dr. Stanislaw, why do I go to bed with a good blood sugar reading, but then wake up and it’s too high? A: There are 4 reasons for unexplained high morning blood sugar levels. Having a thorough knowledge of why blood sugar levels do what they do is an essential, yet often lacking, piece to good diabetes care. Morning blood sugars can be especially hard to understand. You go to bed and your blood sugar level is perfect....Ahhh. Then you wake up and it's awful?! What happened?? I’ve had type 1 since I was seven years old. When I was diagnosed in 1980, blood glucose testing didn’t even exist. I had to pee in a cup twice a day and test how much sugar was in it, which only told me if I had been high over the past few hours. There was no way to ever know what my glucose level was in the moment…we’ve come a long way! Being able to know what your glucose level is at any time is a fabulous advancement that allows you to have better care. But more information can lead to new frustrations. Back then, if I woke up and didn’t feel low, all was good. Today, we can know exactly where our level is at anytime and if it’s in good range we’re happy and smiling! But if it’s not, we’re likely frowning and not feeling so hot. So let’s take a look at four reasons why blood sugar can be high in the morning: 1.) Your BACKGROUND MEDICATION is set too low. A perfectly set regimen of oral blood sugar management medications and/or basal/long-acting insulin dose should keep your blood sugar normal throughout the night and allow you to wake up with a normal blood sugar level. However many people with diabetes are not on adequate oral meds and/or do not have a properly set basal insulin dose to allow this to happen. I help my patients figure this out via planning a specific typ Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Editor’s note: Dr. Paul Donohue’s column, long a popular feature in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, now has an online home, as well. Check out the medical questions and answers Mondays through Fridays on Health + Fitness. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE DR. DONOHUE COLUMNS. DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I have type 2 diabetes and check my blood sugar every morning before breakfast. It's usually in the 125 mg/dl (6.9 mmol/L) to 150 (8.3) range. When I have my blood sugar checked at the lab, they tell me to fast before taking the test. My AIC is in the 6.2 to 6.5 range. My doctors are happy with these numbers. I take metformin and glyburide daily. I am 80 and have been doing this for many years. My question is that before retiring for the night my sugar reading is 110 (6.1) to 120 (6.7). Why does my sugar rise during the night when I'm asleep? No one gives me a satisfactory answer. Some say, "The body does strange things," and other nonsensical answers. Can you give me a common-sense answer? -- P.V. ANSWER: It's not easy explaining why blood sugar rises when you have nothing to eat during sleep. I don't mean to offend you, but do you take a late-evening snack? It can take four hours for some food to exit the stomach. The carbohydrates taken from the snack might not raise blood sugar until four hours after you've eaten it. A better explanation is that your diabetes medicines have been metabolized before you wake up in the morning. Metformin comes in two different preparations, an extended-release form and an immediate-release form. If you take the immediate release, the medicine might be long gone before you waken the next day. The same goes for glyburide. It lasts from 12 to 24 hours. But if you are a person in whom it lasts on the shorter side of that span, it, too, may have been metaboliz Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Levels High In Morning & Low After Eating

Blood Glucose Levels High In Morning & Low After Eating

You may be puzzled by a high blood glucose reading in the morning despite going to bed with a good reading the night before. Or your postmeal blood glucose may be lower than the reading before you ate. Unusual blood glucose fluctuation can be frustrating for diabetics and is affected by many factors. Keeping a good record of your diet, medication and blood glucose can often help you solve the mystery. Video of the Day If you consistently wake up with higher blood glucose levels despite being compliant with your meal plan, this could be a condition known as the dawn phenomenon, states the American Diabetes Association. Dawn phenomenon is a a sudden rise of blood glucose levels 10 to 20 milligrams per deciliter in the early morning between 2:00 and 8:00 a.m. It is caused by an increased release of hormones such as cortisol, glucagon and epinephrine while your body is preparing to wake up. These hormones increase insulin resistance and stimulate your liver to release glucose, causing blood glucose levels to rise. Insufficient insulin or medication, excessive carbohydrate snacks at bedtime or high-fat meals at dinner may also cause blood glucose to be elevated in the morning. To rule out if your high blood glucose is due to dawn phenomenon, your endocrinologist may ask you to eat a low-fat, carbohydrate-controlled dinner, maintain your usual physical activities and check your blood glucose around 2 or 3 a.m. for several days. Your doctor will help you determine if you have dawn phenomenon and adjust your medications accordingly. If the fluctuation is due to food, your dietitian may alter your meal plan and may suggest that you skip a bedtime snack or change the type of snack to a lean protein, modify your dinner or add some light exercise after dinner. When you wake up with Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

back to Overview Markus, one of our great German-language authors, wrote about struggling with high blood sugar after exercise. I know it's a common problem, and one I've struggled with personally, so I want to make sure you get to see it, too. From Markus Berndt: It’s one of the first recommendations you get after being diagnosed with diabetes. “Get active, do more exercise, it’s good for you!” And since we’ve been a child we’ve heard that exercise is healthy. If we do it consistently we’re rewarded, literally, with an awesome beach body. Adding exercise into our day is also good for our diabetes. We’re taught that exercise lowers blood sugar, right? But can the opposite also be true? Can you have high blood sugar after exercise? Up close We now know that physical activity usually lowers blood sugar because it reduces how much insulin is needed to move sugar into the cells. While, in the past, most experts advised frequent training intervals at moderate intensity, but recent studies have shown that even short, intense workouts are very effective. For example, a 15-minute intense weight training lowered blood sugar even more than what’s seen in some endurance training. So activity lowers blood sugar – but not always! Personally, I experienced this very early on and was extremely irritated! I just learned that exercise lowers blood sugar, but an intense 45-minute run consistently resulted in higher blood sugars than when I started! What in the world? At first, I was confused and felt like I didn’t understand the world anymore. Then it was more of a “would you look at this?” kind of thing. And finally, I was determined to figure out what was happening. I knew there had to be an explanation. Why does exercise sometimes raise blood sugar? Exercise Continue reading >>

Why Blood Sugar Can Be High In The Morning

Why Blood Sugar Can Be High In The Morning

You wouldn’t expect hours of sleep and fasting to leave you with high blood sugar. But elevated morning glucose may be more common than you think. Although it’s not a major problem when it occurs from time to time, consistently high morning levels need your doctor’s attention. Causes of Morning Hyperglycemia High blood glucose in the morning typically occurs due to one of three distinct causes: Dawn Phenomenon The “dawn phenomenon” describes high morning glucose that occurs due to a natural rise in hormone levels. During the early morning hours between about 4 and 8 a.m., your body releases hormones like cortisol and growth hormones to get ready for the day. For reasons experts don’t completely understand, your liver produces extra glucose in response to these hormones. People without diabetes secrete more insulin to handle the extra glucose. But for people with diabetes, blood glucose levels can rise too high. Increased blood sugar due to the dawn phenomenon is usually treated with diabetes medication. If you are on insulin, your insulin levels may need to be changed. The Somogyi Effect It’s possible to experience low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, while sleeping and not even know it. The potentially dangerous problem can occur for a number of different reasons—from not eating enough or taking too much insulin, to drinking too much alcohol. In some people, the body compensates for the hypoglycemia by producing a lot of hormones. This, in turn, causes blood sugar levels to rise. Not everyone wakes in reaction to low blood glucose levels. But being sweaty or having a headache in the morning can be a sign. If you suffer from the Somogyi effect (named after the scientist who first described the condition), your doctor may recommend that you eat a snack befor Continue reading >>

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