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Why Is It So Important To Properly Manage Diabetes?

The Importance Of Monitoring Blood-glucose Levels

The Importance Of Monitoring Blood-glucose Levels

Since your doctor told you that you have diabetes, you’ve had to make a few changes to your habits. Among other things, you probably now have to use a small device called blood glucose meter. Are you aware of the importance of monitoring your blood-glucose levels regularly? Essential facts about diabetes Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects the way the body treats glucose (sugar) in the blood. In the case of type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot produce insulin, a hormone that allows the body’s cells to use glucose and produce energy. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is a two-part affliction: first, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, and second, insulin can no longer play its role properly because the body’s cells are unaffected by it (insulin resistance). People suffering from diabetes, no matter what type, have to be followed by a doctor for life. Type 2 diabetes can, in some cases, initially be controlled by healthy eating habits, weight loss and increased physical activity. Many people with type 2 diabetes, however, will eventually have to take medication; it is most often taken orally, but sometimes it is administered by injection, such as insulin. For its part, treating type 1 diabetes is essentially based on daily insulin injections. Oral medication is not effective for this type of diabetes. Why is it important to control blood-glucose levels? Many people who live with diabetes don’t feel any particular symptoms, unless they are experiencing hyperglycemia (glucose level is too high) or hypoglycemia (glucose level is too low). Hyperglycemia can cause significant damage to some organs, which then leads to complications of diabetes. These include: cardiac or vascular event, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack) or stroke; kidney pr Continue reading >>

Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

twitter summary: Ten tips for newly diagnosed T2 #diabetes: act NOW for long-term benefits, use healthy eating, exercise, meds + structured blood glucose testing short summary: This article offers ten tips for people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes: 1) Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing; 2) Start to take care of your diabetes as soon as you’re diagnosed (and even better, before, if you know you have prediabetes); 3) Recognize that type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease; 4) Keep in mind that food has a major impact on blood glucose; work to optimize your mealtime choices; 5) Exercise is a powerful and underutilized tool which can increase insulin sensitivity and improve health – use it as much as possible; 6) Use blood glucose testing to identify patterns; 7) Don’t forget that needing to take insulin doesn’t mean you failed; 8) Keep learning and find support; 9) Seek out the services of a Diabetes Educator; and 10) Review our Patient's Guide to Individualizing Therapy at www.diaTribe.org/patientguide. Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing. It develops through a combination of factors that are still being uncovered and better understood. Lifestyle (food, exercise, stress, sleep) certainly plays a major role, but genetics play a significant role as well. Type 2 diabetes is often described in the media as a result of being overweight, but the relationship is not that simple. Many overweight individuals never get type 2, and some people with type 2 were never overweight. At its core, type 2 involves two physiological issues: resistance to the insulin made by the person’s beta cells and too little insulin production relative to the amount one needs. These problems can lead to high bl Continue reading >>

Managing Your Child’s Diabetes

Managing Your Child’s Diabetes

As your child’s primary caregiver the role of managing their diabetes will fall mainly to you in the early stages of their childhood. This can be very daunting at first but there is a lot of resources available to you. Your child’s healthcare team and Diabetes Ireland are also here to help you. Check out our Pete the Pancreas booklets below. They are designed to help parent and child learn about diabetes in a child friendly way. Whilst you are their primary carer today, as they grow up they will need to manage their condition themselves. Therefore, it is important to involve your child in the learning process and make decisions with them. Whilst it will be challenging at first, overtime you will realise that your child can live a happy and healthy life with their diabetes. Parental leave – The Parental Leave Act 1998, as amended by the Parental Leave (Amendment) Act 2006, allows parents to take parental leave from employment in respect of certain children. On 8 March 2013 the European Union (Parental Leave) Regulations 2013 increased the amount of parental leave available to each parent per child from 14 weeks to 18 weeks. (Those who have taken or are taking 14 weeks’ parental leave are also entitled to this extra 4 weeks.) The Regulations extended the age limit for a child with a long-term illness to 16 years. For more information visit Citizens Information – – Self-management Self-management is the best way to manage diabetes. Your child may be too young to do this at the moment, it is up to you the parent to manage their diabetes and teach them along the way. This means that you keep track of their blood glucose and take an active part in the treatment of their diabetes. What and when to teach your child 0 – 5 years old From 0-4 months, most children ha Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Control Type 2 Diabetes

6 Ways To Control Type 2 Diabetes

Last year during a physical, Lauren Crim of Richwood, TX, got a diagnosis she wasn’t expecting: type 2 diabetes. She had no symptoms, so the news threw her for a loop. “I was devastated,” she says. “My grandmother had diabetes, and I saw her go through major health struggles because of it.” After seeking support from loved ones -- and shedding a few tears -- Crim got to work. With help from her health care team, she changed the way she ate and started exercising. Now, a year later, she’s 22 pounds lighter, and her blood sugar is normal. “My advice to anyone else facing type 2 diabetes is to stick to a plan, stay positive, and put your health first,” she says. A diabetes diagnosis might feel overwhelming, but living well with the condition doesn’t have to be. If you’re ready to take control of your blood sugar levels and get on the path to better health, here’s how to start. “It takes a village to manage diabetes,” says Linda Siminerio, RN, PhD, chair of the National Diabetes Education Program. Along with your doctor or nurse practitioner, you can get help from: Diabetes educators Dietitians or nutritionists Pharmacists Endocrinologists Podiatrists Dentists Psychologists or Therapists Their services are often covered by insurance. Having a health care team is key, but you're the most important member of it. “We want you to be informed and empowered,” Siminerio says. Take an active role in your care. Ask questions. Learn what your medications do and how to take them properly. Practice any other healthy habits your doctor recommends. And know what your A1c levels are and what they mean. “Being overweight is one of the major drivers of the epidemic of diabetes,” says Vivian Fonseca, MD, a professor of medicine and pharmacology at Tulane Uni Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

One in eleven Americans has diabetes – that’s 29.1 million people. Another 86 million – one out of every three Americans – has prediabetes. What is this disease that affects so many people and can result in such serious health consequences? November is Diabetes Awareness Month, and Texas Health Care physicians want you to have the facts about diabetes, including how to significantly reduce your risk for ever developing it. “Diabetes is a serious health condition and one that’s affecting more and more people,” says Dr. Karen Grant, a primary care physician. “The good news is that through lifestyle changes, many people can significantly reduce their risk of the most common form of this disease, type 2 diabetes.” Diabetes is a disorder of the metabolism, meaning the body is not properly using the food it is consuming. Under normal circumstances, our liver breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, also known as blood sugar. The liver releases the glucose into the blood stream. Meanwhile, the pancreas, a gland located near the stomach, produces insulin, which is a hormone that helps the body’s cells absorb the sugar in the blood. Our cells then use the glucose for energy. If a person’s cells are unable to absorb enough glucose, blood sugar levels rise. This can lead to diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes, formerly called “juvenile diabetes,” occurs when the body is unable to create insulin, usually due to an attack on the immune system. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in childhood but can also occur in adults. About five percent of people with diabetes have Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is the most commonly-diagnosed form of all diabetes, accounting for 90-95 percent of all cases. Type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Diet: What You Should Know

Type 2 Diabetes And Diet: What You Should Know

Why does my diet matter? It’s no secret that diet is essential to managing type 2 diabetes. Although there isn’t a one-size-fits-all diet for diabetes management, certain dietary choices should act as the foundation for your individual diet plan. Your diet plan should work with your body — not against it — so it’s important that the food you eat won’t spike your blood sugar levels to high. According to the American Diabetes Association, the normal blood sugar range for people with diabetes is between 80 to 130 mg/dL before meals. It should be less than 180 mg/dL about two hours after you begin eating. Your doctor will provide you with personalized target blood sugar values. Keep reading to learn more about how what you eat can affect your blood sugar, as well as which foods you may want to pick up at the grocery store or toss out of your pantry. Check out: Type 1 diabetes diet » When someone with diabetes has low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), a spoonful of sugar or honey can help raise glucose levels. However, sugar is often considered the nemesis of diabetes because of how quickly it can spike blood glucose levels when eaten alone. If you have diabetes, you should closely monitor your consumption of foods with a high glycemic index (GI). The GI measures how quickly a particular food raises blood sugar. Those foods with a high GI can cause unwanted spikes. This is especially true of refined sugar and other forms of simple carbohydrates like white rice, bread, and pasta. Make sure that most of your carb choices are whole-grain, high-fiber options. For example, if you’d like to have a piece of chocolate cake with frosting, eat it immediately after eating a balanced meal with lean protein, healthy fats, vegetables, and high-fiber carb options such as beans. Ea Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

How do I know if my diabetes pill is working? The best way to find out how well your diabetes pill is working is to test your blood sugar. Ask a member of your health care team what time of day is best for testing. You'll want to test when your diabetes medicine is expected to be most active in your body. Keep a record of your blood sugar levels (PDF) during that time to see if they're at or near your goal. If your levels are at or near your goal and you're not having any problems with the medicine, then it's probably working well. If you're still not sure, talk to your doctor or other member of your care team. Can I stop taking my diabetes medicine after my blood sugar is under control? It's reasonable to think that after a person gets good blood sugar control, it means the end of managing diabetes. But that's not the case. People with type 1 diabetes aren't able to make their own insulin, so they will always need to take insulin shots every day. For people with type 2 diabetes who are on medicine, the answer isn't as clear. Sometimes when people are first diagnosed, they start on pills or insulin right away. If the person also works hard to control diabetes with diet and exercise, he or she can lower the need for medicine and might be able to stop taking it altogether. As long as the person is able to keep blood sugar levels normal with diet and exercise, there isn't a need for medicine. However, type 2 diabetes changes over time. The change can be fast or slow, but it does change. This means that even if a person was able to stop taking medicine for a while, he or she might need to start taking it again in the future. If a person is taking medicine to keep blood sugar normal, then it's important to keep taking it to lower the chances for heart disease and other healt Continue reading >>

Senior Diabetes 101: Important Information On Living With This Condition

Senior Diabetes 101: Important Information On Living With This Condition

Diabetes has quickly become an epidemic in today's senior community, with nearly 25% of adults over the age of 60 living with this disease. Millions of seniors from all over the country, with all different backgrounds constantly find themselves living with this disease. While diabetes can be a difficult diagnosis to live with, the good news is there are ways to manage the disease so that any senior can continue to live a relatively normal life with diabetes. With this in mind, it is important for seniors, family members and caregivers alike understand diabetes and most importantly understand how to safely live with diabetes. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is one of the most common illnesses in the world, yet many people today do not know what diabetes really is. Simply put, diabetes is a group of different diseases that come from an individual who has high glucose levels in their blood. Typically, these high glucose levels come from the body's inability to produce and use insulin, which is a hormone that is created in the pancreas. Insulin is in charge of controlling the body's glucose levels. There are two types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is more common in adults and is what most seniors likely have when they are diagnosed with diabetes. However, about 5% of diabetic adults today do have type 1. How to Diagnose Diabetes In order to get an official diabetes diagnosis, seniors will need to visit a doctor in order to have a number of blood tests done. This is the best and most efficient way to determine whether or not someone has diabetes. However, there are some signs and symptoms of diabetes that may be present that can act as warning signs. Seniors who experience these symptoms should visit the doctor immediately for testing. The faster senior Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

This publication has been reviewed by NDEP for plain language principles. Learn more about our review process. Actions you can take The marks in this booklet show actions you can take to manage your diabetes. Help your health care team make a diabetes care plan that will work for you. Learn to make wise choices for your diabetes care each day. Step 1: Learn about diabetes. What is diabetes? There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes – Your body does not make insulin. This is a problem because you need insulin to take the sugar (glucose) from the foods you eat and turn it into energy for your body. You need to take insulin every day to live. Type 2 diabetes – Your body does not make or use insulin well. You may need to take pills or insulin to help control your diabetes. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational (jest-TAY-shun-al) diabetes – Some women get this kind of diabetes when they are pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after the baby is born. But even if it goes away, these women and their children have a greater chance of getting diabetes later in life. You are the most important member of your health care team. You are the one who manages your diabetes day by day. Talk to your doctor about how you can best care for your diabetes to stay healthy. Some others who can help are: dentist diabetes doctor diabetes educator dietitian eye doctor foot doctor friends and family mental health counselor nurse nurse practitioner pharmacist social worker How to learn more about diabetes. Take classes to learn more about living with diabetes. To find a class, check with your health care team, hospital, or area health clinic. You can also search online. Join a support group — in-person or online — to get peer support with managing your Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes: How To Best Manage Type 1 And Type 2

Living With Diabetes: How To Best Manage Type 1 And Type 2

Knowing how to properly manage your diabetes, whether you have Type 1 or Type 2, can ensure that you live a healthy and happy life. According to the American Diabetes Association, there are three components to managing diabetes:¹ diabetes medications, nutrition, and physical activity. Key to successful diabetes management is continued consultation on these components with your health care team—which could include your doctor, a nurse, a dietician, a pharmacist, and a diabetes educator. Here is what to think about if you are living with Type 1: Glucose and insulin: Because your body does not create insulin, you have to give yourself insulin with an insulin pen or pump. Your health care team can help you determine how much insulin you need, what type of insulin is best for you, and how often you need to check your blood glucose levels. Nutrition: The type of food you eat for snacks or at mealtimes can directly affect your blood glucose level. As a result, the foods you eat can affect the amount of insulin you need to inject, so it is important to make sure you work with your doctor to develop an appropriate dietary schedule. Physical activity: Incorporating exercise into your daily routine can help you maintain a stable glucose level, increase your mental alertness, and boost your energy levels. Doing so is easier than you may think; for example, take the stairs whenever possible, or use your lunch hour to hit the gym. Here is what to think about if you have Type 2: Medicine: Diabetes medications, both pills and insulin, can lower blood glucose levels in different ways for Type 2 patients who don’t make enough insulin or cannot use it properly. Consult your health care team to help determine which medicines are best for you and how often to check your blood glucose l Continue reading >>

Treating Type Ii Diabetes - Pharmacology

Treating Type Ii Diabetes - Pharmacology

- [Voiceover] Type II diabetes receives a lot of attention in the laypress as a public health threat, as it affects about 10% of the global population, and is currently the eighth most common cause of death worldwide. As such, understanding how to treat type II diabetes is very important because if it's treated properly, one can avoid nearly all of the complications of type II diabetes and live a happy and healthy life. Now before we dive into the specific treatments, let's first discuss the glucose regulation pathway as it will help us to better understand the pharmacokinetics or the mechanisms of action for the different treatments of type II diabetes. Now in the center here is the blood glucose level, and as blood glucose levels increase, say after eating a meal, this is sensed by the pancreas, and the beta cells within the pancreas secrete insulin which acts on cells throughout the body to lower the blood glucose level. Then as blood glucose levels decrease, this is also sensed by the pancreas, and then the alpha cells secrete glucagon which acts to raise the blood glucose levels. And one of the mechanisms by which it does so is by promoting the conversion of glycogen to glucose in the liver which is then released into the blood stream. Now diabetes mellitus is a group of disorders that's caused by dysfunction of the insulin pathway resulting in an inability to lower blood glucose levels. And as you can see by this diagram, there are two main steps that must occur for this pathway to work properly. First, insulin must be secreted by the beta cells of the pancreas. Then second, the cells throughout the body must respond to insulin for it to have an effect. And this glucose regulation pathway can be thought of as similar to that of the temperature regulation in a buil Continue reading >>

My Friend Has Diabetes. How Can I Help?

My Friend Has Diabetes. How Can I Help?

What's My Friend Going Through? Diabetes. Sure, you've heard of it. But how much do you really know about what it's like to live with it? Teens with diabetes often say they feel isolated and alone. After all, it's hard enough being a teenager with all the body changes and hormone surges — dealing day-to-day with a health problem like diabetes can only make things harder. Having to test your blood sugar several times a day, keep tabs on what you eat, and give yourself insulin shots or other medicine is enough to make anyone feel self-conscious and different. As a result, some people may want to pretend that their diabetes doesn't exist. That's not a good plan, because it usually leads to poorly controlled diabetes. And that can be dangerous to your friend's health. As a friend, your understanding and acceptance are very important. The more you know about diabetes, the less self-conscious and alone your friend is likely to feel. And that's good for anyone's health! What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose. When you eat, glucose from the food gets into your bloodstream. Then, the pancreas makes a hormone called insulin that helps the glucose in the blood get into the body's cells, where it's used as fuel. When people get diabetes, the glucose in their blood doesn't get into the cells as well as it should, so it stays in the blood instead. This makes blood sugar levels get too high and can lead to symptoms like getting very thirsty or peeing a lot. Proper treatment of diabetes helps to control these symptoms. It also can help prevent long-term effects — like kidney, eye, nerve, or heart problems — that can happen in people who have high blood sugar levels for many years. The two main types of diabetes that can occur during childho Continue reading >>

What Are Diabetic Socks?

What Are Diabetic Socks?

Most diabetic socks on the market are socks that are made to keep the feet dry, decrease the risk of foot injury, and avoid preventing or slowing blood circulation. They usually are made of materials that have superior abilities to wick away moisture, are fitted, padded, and nonbinding, and do not have seams. Why People With Diabetes Need Special Socks People with diabetes are at higher risk of foot injuries and infection due to damage to their circulatory and nervous systems caused by high blood sugar levels. Nerve damage, or neuropathy, decreases sensation and increases risk of injury, especially on the bottom of the feet. It can also cause a patient to be unaware of an injury and delay treatment. Circulatory problems make it harder for wounds to heal because it is difficult for them to benefit from the healing properties of the bloodstream. High blood sugar levels also can create a sluggish immune system. These problems can create a situation that could lead to amputation or even death. Clearly, foot care is an extremely important consideration for someone with diabetes. What If I Don't Have Any Foot Issues? People with diabetes who have "normal" feet can wear whatever comfortable socks they like. They should not be tight, constricting, lumpy, or have seams that are uncomfortable. Do not use socks that can lead to injuries, such as friction blisters. Fitted socks are a better choice than tube socks. What If I Have Decreased Sensation? In people with diabetes who are at higher risk for developing ulcers because they cannot sense pressure, a good choice may be a densely padded sock that is made of acrylic fiber. Acrylic fibers seem to have better moisture-wicking abilities. Light or white colored socks can help a person who has decreased foot sensation discover injurie Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Weight Management

Diabetes And Weight Management

Tweet Eating well and maintaining a stable weight is particularly important for people with diabetes, so we figured that learning more about weight management was long overdue. Lowering waist measurement will help to improve your blood sugar control and reduce the risk of diabetes complications. The diabetes community recently called for the creation of a weight loss forum, but how do you manage your weight as a diabetic? Reaching a healthy weight may seem like a serious challenge, but it can seriously improve your long-term health. As well as self-esteem and a greater quality of life, losing weight helps you to feel fit and healthy. There are a variety of different approaches to losing weight, with each individual experiencing weight loss in a different way. Do I need to lose weight? Waist circumference can tell you if you need to lose weight, using the following guidelines: Waist circumference measurements White and black men should be below 94cm (37 inches) Asian men should be below 90cm (35 inches) White, black and Asian women should be below 80cm Body Mass Index determines weight in relation to height. To learn more about your BMI please check our BMI calculator. If you are confused about your BMI, discuss it with your healthcare team. Discuss weight management in the Weight Loss forum How do I lose weight? Motivation is the key in losing weight. Write down why you want to lose weight. Stare at the challenges to time and budget head on, face them down and work around them. If you need help in losing weight, your diabetes nurse, GP or dietician should be on hand to talk to you and help you. Work out a healthy diet plan based around portion control, and control the calories. Set yourself clear long and short-term goals to achieve as you lose weight. Write it down, an Continue reading >>

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