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Why Is It Important To Maintain Blood Glucose Levels

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often appear suddenly and are often the reason for checking blood sugar levels. Because symptoms of other types of diabetes and prediabetes come on more gradually or may not be evident, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended screening guidelines. The ADA recommends that the following people be screened for diabetes: Anyone with a body mass index higher than 25, regardless of age, who has additional risk factors, such as high blood pressure, a sedentary lifestyle, a history of polycystic ovary syndrome, having delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds, a history of diabetes in pregnancy, high cholesterol levels, a history of heart disease, and having a close relative with diabetes. Anyone older than age 45 is advised to receive an initial blood sugar screening, and then, if the results are normal, to be screened every three years thereafter. Tests for type 1 and type 2 diabetes and prediabetes Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates prediabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. If the A1C test results aren't consistent, the test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Six Foods That May Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes Diet: Six Foods That May Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

While there's no substitute for a balanced healthy diet, adding certain foods may help those with diabetes keep sugar levels under control. Coffee and cinnamon have made headlines as foods that might be able to help cut the risk of diabetes or help maintain healthy blood sugar levels. However, don't get the idea that such foods are magic pills for your diabetic diet. It's still important for people with diabetes to eat a balanced healthy diet and exercise to help manage the condition. Nevertheless, some foods, such as white bread, are converted almost immediately to blood sugar, causing a quick spike. Other foods, such as brown rice, are digested more slowly, causing a lower and gentler change in blood sugar. If you are trying to follow a healthy diet for diabetes, here are 6 suggestions that may help to keep your blood sugar in check. Porridge Porridge can help control blood sugar and the charity Diabetes UK recommends it to see you through the morning. Even though porridge is a carbohydrate, it's a very good carbohydrate. Because it's high in soluble fibre, it's slower to digest and it won't raise your blood sugar as much or as quickly. It's going to work better at maintaining a healthy blood sugar level over time. Not only does this high-quality carbohydrate offer a steadier source of energy than white bread, it can also help with weight loss. The soluble fibre in oats helps to keep us feeling fuller longer. That's important for people with type 2 diabetes, who tend to be overweight. If you reduce the weight, you usually significantly improve the glucose control. Barley isn't as popular as oats, but there's some evidence that barley, which is also high in soluble fibre, may also help with blood glucose control. Besides oats and barley, most whole grains are going to Continue reading >>

The Roles Of Gpd1 In Maintaining Blood Glucose Levels Under Fasting Conditions

The Roles Of Gpd1 In Maintaining Blood Glucose Levels Under Fasting Conditions

Abstract Glucose is used as one of the energy sources in many organs. Under feeding conditions, glucose can be obtained from dietary carbohydrate. On the other hand, when external supply of energy is interrupted, such as fasting, carbohydrate preserved in liver and glycogenic precursor derived from other organs are used to maintain blood glucose levels. Glycerol and glycogenic amino acid derived from adipocyte and skeletal muscle, respectively, are utilized as glycogenic precursor. But, it hasn’t become clear which glycogenic precursor is more important in gluconeogenesis. The recent study revealed that Metformin, therapeutics for treating type 2 diabetes, depressed gluconeogenesis from glycerol by inhibition of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) 2. This result suggests that glycerol have a potent impact on gluconeogenesis. In this study, we focused attention on GPD1, which is the enzyme that related gluconeogenesis using glycerol, and examined the roles of GPD1 in gluconeogenesis and importance of glycerol as glycogenic precursor. Using GPD1 null mutant model BALB/cHeA mice (HeA mice), we measured the change of blood glucose levels under fasting conditions and gene expressions related to gluconeogenesis in liver. BALB/cBy mice (By mice) were used as a control. In HeA mice, blood glucose levels at 1 to 4 hour after fasting were significantly higher than the By mice. The hepatic gene expressions involved in gluconeogenesis and aminotransferase such as glucose-6-phosphatase and alanine amino transferase were also higher than the By mice. Moreover, we examined availability of the glycogenic amino acid by alanine tolerance test. At 30 min after alanine administration, blood glucose level was significantly higher in the HeA mice. In short, these data suggests that la Continue reading >>

Maintaining Steady Blood Sugar Keeps The Pounds Off

Maintaining Steady Blood Sugar Keeps The Pounds Off

Maintaining stable blood sugar levels has big implications for good health. Getting through the day with no blood sugar spikes and drops keeps your energy even, from morning to night. Blood sugar peaks and valleys can cause mood swings, energy dips, fatigue, irritability, headaches, cravings for carbohydrates or coffee, lightheadedness, a shaky feeling if you skip a meal or the feeling that you need a nap after eating. If you suffer from any of these symptoms, you might want to think about blood sugar and how much better you can feel when you avoid the highs and lows. The fix for all of these symptoms is blood sugar regulation. Many hormones come into play, such as insulin. After eating a meal containing carbs, our bodies break the carbs down into simple sugars that are then carried in the bloodstream. The pancreas responds by secreting insulin. Insulin's job is to travel through the bloodstream seeking sugar and transport it into cells for storage in the form of glucose. Glucose levels in the blood then come back down to the proper level. When blood glucose is chronically high, damage can occur to the liver, pancreas, kidney, blood vessels, brain and nerves. Keeping blood sugars at a reasonable level is important for overall health. The body's first choice when it goes to store sugar is to put it in the liver and the muscles. The problem arises when these storage sites become full. The body then needs to find another place to put it, storing sugar in the form of triglycerides. Some of the triglycerides remain in the blood, and some get stored as body fat. The body uses carbohydrates for fuel first. If you eat a steady supply of carbs, they are readily available to the body, and it doesn't have to take carbs out of storage when it needs some energy. You never get to tap Continue reading >>

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) is the amount of glucose in your blood at a given time. It is important to check your blood glucose (sugar) levels, because it will: Provide a quick measurement of your blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Determine if you have a high or low blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Show you how your lifestyle and medication affect your blood glucose (sugar) levels; and Help you and your diabetes health-care team to make lifestyle and medication changes that will improve your blood glucose (sugar) levels. How often should you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels? How frequently you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels should be decided according to your own treatment plan. You and your health-care provider can discuss when and how often you should check your blood glucose (sugar) levels. Checking your blood glucose (sugar) levels is also called Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG). How do you test your blood glucose levels? A blood glucose (sugar) meter is used to check your blood glucose (sugar) at home. You can get these meters at most pharmacies or from your diabetes educator. Talk with your diabetes educator or pharmacist about which one is right for you. Once you receive a meter, ensure you receive the proper training before you begin to use it. Ask your health-care provider about: How and where to draw blood How to use and dispose of lancets (the device that punctures your skin) The size of the drop of blood needed The type of blood glucose (sugar) strips to use How to clean the meter How to check if the meter is accurate How to code your meter (if needed) Note: Your province or territory may subsidize the cost of blood glucose (sugar) monitoring supplies. Contact your local Diabetes Canada branch to find out if this appli Continue reading >>

Regulation Of Blood Glucose: Importance & Nutrient Conversion

Regulation Of Blood Glucose: Importance & Nutrient Conversion

Blood glucose levels are closely regulated and maintained within a narrow range. Learn how the pancreatic hormones, insulin and glucagon, maintain normal blood sugar levels and how other nutrients can be converted to blood glucose in this lesson. If you drink a 12-ounce can of soda, did you know that you are consuming almost ten teaspoons of sugar? So, what does your body do with all of that sugar? Well, refined sugar is handled like any other simple or complex carbohydrate that you consume, which means it gets converted to glucose. Glucose is a simple sugar that is used as energy by your body and brain. Now, just because every cell in your body uses glucose doesn't mean you should start eating more sugar. Your body only allows a certain amount of glucose to be present in your bloodstream at one time. If there's too much, the extra is sent to storage, and as we will discover, one of your body's favorite storage places is your fat cells. In this lesson, we will take a look at how the amount of glucose found in your blood, referred to as blood glucose or blood sugar, is regulated and how nutrients other than carbs can be converted into glucose. When you stop by a fast food restaurant and enjoy a double cheeseburger, fries, and a soda, the carbohydrates in your meal get broken down into glucose within your digestive tract. These molecules are small enough to pass into your bloodstream causing your blood glucose level to rise. Your pancreas is not happy about this rising blood sugar. In fact, your pancreas acts somewhat like a bouncer at a nightclub; there is too much sugar crowding your bloodstream, so your pancreas tells some of it to leave. To do this your pancreas secretes insulin, which is a hormone that moves glucose out of the blood and into the cells. In other words Continue reading >>

Why Balancing Your Blood Sugar Is The Key To A Slimmer Waistline

Why Balancing Your Blood Sugar Is The Key To A Slimmer Waistline

Blood sugar is probably a word you’ve heard thrown around here and there, but do you actually understand what it is, and what effect it has on your body? As it turns out, balancing your blood sugar is the key to maintaining a healthy weight. Keep reading to find out everything you need to know about blood sugar! Blood sugar, or glucose, is our main source of energy. It dictates how hungry and energetic we feel. Blood sugar is produced when we break down any carbohydrate—from quinoa to cake. The key idea with respect to blood sugar is balance. We feel best and lose fat when our blood sugar is balanced: not too high, not too low. Eating the right amount of protein, fat, and fiber at each meal can help you naturally stabilize blood sugar to burn fat and have consistent energy throughout the day. It will also help to keep aggressive insulin spikes at bay. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Blood Glucose Monitoring

One of the main aims of diabetes treatment is to keep blood glucose levels within a specified target range. The key is balancing your food with your activity, lifestyle and diabetes medicines. Blood glucose monitoring can help you understand the link between blood glucose, food, exercise and insulin. Over time your readings will provide you and your health professionals with the information required to determine the best management strategy for your diabetes. Maintaining good blood glucose control is your best defence to reduce the chances of developing complications from diabetes. Self-blood glucose monitoring allows you to check your blood glucose levels as often as you need to or as recommended by your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. To test blood glucose levels, you need: A blood glucose meter A lancet device with lancets Test strips. Blood glucose meters are usually sold as kits giving you all the equipment you need to start. There are many different types, offering different features and at different prices to meet individual needs. Most of these are available from Diabetes Australia in your state or territory, pharmacies and some diabetes centres. Your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator can help you choose the meter that’s best for you, and your Credentialled Diabetes Educator or pharmacist can show you how to use your meter to get accurate results. To test your blood glucose levels, you prick your finger with the lancet and add a small drop of blood onto a testing strip. This strip is then inserted into the meter, which reads the strip and displays a number – your blood glucose level. When and how often you should test your blood glucose levels varies depending on each individual, the type of diabetes and the tablets and/or insulin being us Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Control (blood Sugar Levels)

Blood Glucose Control (blood Sugar Levels)

Introduction to blood sugar levels Our blood glucose level, or blood sugar level, is the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. The amount of glucose in the blood is measured in millimoles per litre (mmol/l). Glucose levels are measured most commonly to diagnose or to monitor diabetes. It is also important to keep an eye on blood glucose levels during certain situations – for example: during pregnancy, pancreatitis and with increasing age. Normally, blood sugar levels stay within a narrow range during the day. A good level is between 4 to 8mmol/l. After you consume food, your blood sugar level will rise and after you have had a night’s rest, they will usually be lowest in the morning. Diabetes is a common disease in our society, affecting 2-5% of the general population, with many more people unaware that they may be affected by this condition. Diabetes results from a lack of insulin, or insensitivity of the body towards the level of insulin present. Thus if you have diabetes, your blood sugar level may move outside the normal limits. Why is controlling blood sugar levels so important? Carbohydrate foods are the body’s main energy source. When they are digested, they break down to form glucose in the bloodstream. If you make sure you eat regular meals, spread evenly throughout the day, you will help maintain your energy levels without causing large rises in your blood sugar levels. It is also important to maintain a stable and balanced blood sugar level, as there is a limited range of blood sugar levels in which the brain can function normally. Regular testing of your blood sugar levels allows you to monitor your level of control and assists you in altering your diabetes management strategy if your levels aren’t within the expected/recommended range. Long term c Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar

Blood Sugar

Blood sugar, or glucose, is the main sugar found in your blood. It comes from the food you eat, and is your body's main source of energy. Your blood carries glucose to all of your body's cells to use for energy. Diabetes is a disease in which your blood sugar levels are too high. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. Even if you don't have diabetes, sometimes you may have problems with blood sugar that is too low or too high. Keeping a regular schedule of eating, activity, and taking any medicines you need can help. If you do have diabetes, it is very important to keep your blood sugar numbers in your target range. You may need to check your blood sugar several times each day. Your health care provider will also do a blood test called an A1C. It checks your average blood sugar level over the past three months. If your blood sugar is too high, you may need to take medicines and/or follow a special diet. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Your Management Plan

Diabetes: Your Management Plan

When you have diabetes, it’s very important to keep your blood glucose (sugar) in good control. To do so, you need a personal plan to help you manage your diabetes. This patient education sheet tells you how to control your blood glucose level and manage your diabetes. What is good control? Good control of diabetes means that your blood glucose stays within certain ranges. These ranges are based on guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Here are the numbers that show where your blood glucose should be: Before meals Recommended goal is 70 to 130. You need to improve if your level is often over 150. If your blood glucose is below 70, you need to follow the guidelines for treating low blood glucose. See UPMC education sheet Diabetes: Short-Term Problems. After meals Recommended goal is no higher than 180. If it has been two hours or longer after the start of a meal, this number should be even lower. At bedtime Recommended goal is 110 to 150. You need to improve if your level is often under 110 or over 180. Certain diabetes medications may drop blood glucose too low through the night if you are running in the lower ranges before bedtime. Speak to your doctor or diabetes educator if your are at risk for having low blood glucose. A1c test (A-one-C) This test measures the amount of hemoglobin with sugar attached. The results show your estimated average blood glucose level over 3 months. The light areas on the chart show the recommended target range for A1C. Note that A1c is measured in percent. The chart shows how this compares to your blood glucose readings. Normal A1c is under 5.7 percent. When you have diabetes, recommended goal is 7 percent or less. Goals may vary from person to person. Talk to your doctor or diabetes educator about what goals are best Continue reading >>

Controlling Your Blood Sugar Helps Prevent Complications. Here Are 5 Ways To Do It.

Controlling Your Blood Sugar Helps Prevent Complications. Here Are 5 Ways To Do It.

Nerves are the body’s messengers. From your fingertips to your toes, your nerves control everything from a simple sneeze to your beating heart. But sometimes diabetes can damage this complex network. Researchers believe this happens when, over time, a surplus of glucose destroys the walls of the blood vessels that feed your nerves, particularly in the legs. An estimated 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage, also known as neuropathy. Individuals who have lived with diabetes for many years are at the highest risk for developing neuropathy. But even those who have only had diabetes for a short time can suffer from nerve damage if their blood sugar has been out of control. Experts believe that you can drastically lower your chances of neuropathy and other diabetes complications by consistently keeping your glucose levels in the target range. An important 1993 study found that maintaining strict control over blood glucose reduced risk of neuropathy in people with diabetes by as much as 60 percent. Even if you already have some nerve damage, tighter control of your blood sugar levels may help to thwart or delay further injury. 5 tips to keep your blood sugar levels in check As you know, controlling your blood sugar each day is a big task that requires constant monitoring. And if you take insulin, you also require numerous doses of medicine throughout your day. The following tips can help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels and avoid complications: 1. Eat healthy. Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, a healthy diet can help you manage your glucose level. Monitoring your carb intake is especially important, as carbs can have a dramatic impact on your blood sugar. An ideal meal plan includes a variety of colorful veggies and fruits Continue reading >>

You And Your Hormones

You And Your Hormones

What is glucagon? Glucagon is a hormone that is involved in controlling blood sugar (glucose) levels. It is secreted into the bloodstream by the alpha cells, found in the islets of langerhans, in the pancreas. The glucagon-secreting alpha cells surround a core of insulin-secreting beta cells, which reflects the close relationship between the two hormones. Glucagon’s role in the body is to prevent blood glucose levels dropping too low. To do this, it acts on the liver in several ways: It stimulates the conversion of stored glycogen (stored in the liver) to glucose, which can be released into the bloodstream. This process is called glycogenolysis. It promotes the production of glucose from amino acid molecules. This process is called gluconeogenesis. It reduces glucose consumption by the liver so that as much glucose as possible can be secreted into the bloodstream to maintain blood glucose levels. Glucagon also acts on adipose tissue to stimulate the breakdown of fat stores into the bloodstream. How is glucagon controlled? Glucagon works along with the hormone insulin to control blood sugar levels and keep them within set levels. Glucagon is released to stop blood sugar levels dropping too low, while insulin is released to stop blood sugar levels rising too high. Release of glucagon is stimulated by low blood glucose (hypoglycaemia), protein-rich meals and adrenaline (another important hormone for combating low glucose). Release of glucagon is prevented by raised blood glucose and carbohydrate in meals, detected by cells in the pancreas. In the longer-term, glucagon is crucial to the body’s response to lack of food. For example, it encourages the use of stored fat for energy in order to preserve the limited supply of glucose. What happens if I have too much glucagon? Continue reading >>

Homeostasis: Negative Feedback, Body Temperature, Blood Glucose

Homeostasis: Negative Feedback, Body Temperature, Blood Glucose

7 Parts: Homeostasis is the maintenance of a constant internal environment in response to a changing external environment. Hormones have an important role in this system. Hormones are made of proteins, they are released by glands into the bloodstream, where they reach target cells. A specific hormone will fit a specific receptor protein, and this brings about a change in that cell. Negative feedback is the mechanism by which the body maintains conditions within particular limits. The body will do this by opposing a change that deviates from the normal. The diagram below helps to explain this using the example of body temperature. Note that the opposite change takes the level too far below the normal, therefore a negative response backup will occur, and the process repeats itself, so that over time the temperature oscillates about the normal, within small limits. It is important to maintain a constant temperature so that living organisms can maintain metabolism. There are two types of heat regulation: endothermic where the species controls their own temperature (mammals, birds), and ectothermic where temperature reflects the environmental temperature (lizards, fish). The temperature in mammals is detected by thermoreceptors in the skin and the hypothalamus which is in the brain. Changes in temperature bring about nerve impulses from the brain to the muscles and glands which will bring about changes depending on whether it is hot or cold. The amount of glucose in your blood is carefully controlled. Again, this uses the hormonal system. The hormones responsible for regulating blood glucose are produced in the pancreas in particular areas called islets of Langerhans. After you have eaten a meal, the blood glucose levels will begin to rise because the carbohydrates in the fo Continue reading >>

The 5 Best Supplements To Help Balance Blood Sugar Levels

The 5 Best Supplements To Help Balance Blood Sugar Levels

Balanced blood sugar levels are important for everyone, not just diabetics. Balancing our blood glucose levels results in better health. We feel more energetic. We aren’t as prone to mood swings, and our food cravings don’t make us act like a food-crazed monster. Our brains work better and we can even reduce chronic inflammation. While there are lifestyle choices which will help to balance our blood sugar levels, like drinking enough water and eating regularly, there are a handful of supplements that can help support the body in maintaining this all-important balance. What is a Blood Sugar Level? Blood sugar represents the amount of sugar in the blood which can be carried to the cells to be used for energy. It is changed from sugar to glycogen to be used as fuel by the cells. We can’t dig into a bowl of glucose to feed our cells, but when we eat sugar in all its forms, both natural, and processed, the body uses it to carry out different functions in our bodies. Contrary to what many people believe, sugar isn’t all bad. It is just when we have too little or too much that it becomes a problem. Natural sugars are usually processed by the body the most efficiently, and artificial sweeteners or processed foods like high fructose corn syrup cause additional physiological stress for our bodies in the conversion process. For example, the brain uses nearly one half of all the sugar, or more specifically, glycogen, in our bodies to carry out all its functions. This is its primary source of energy. Both our livers and muscles store glycogen to be released when we need energy the most, but if our blood-sugar levels become too high, the body starts to get confused about when to change sugar into energy and when to pack it on as fat, causing a long list of health concerns, fr Continue reading >>

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