diabetestalk.net

Why Is It Important To Check Your Blood Sugar?

Why Is It Important To Continually Check Blood Sugar Levels If You Are Pregnant With Diabetes?

Why Is It Important To Continually Check Blood Sugar Levels If You Are Pregnant With Diabetes?

ANSWER Whether you had diabetes before you got pregnant or you developed diabetes during your pregnancy, you'll need to keep a close eye on your blood sugar levels. Tight control will help you avoid complications and long-term health problems for both you and your baby. You're eating differently because your body needs more energy to help your baby grow and be healthy. And your changing hormones affect how your body makes and uses insulin. In the later parts of your pregnancy, you may become more insulin resistant, so blood sugar builds up to higher levels. Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Self-monitoring Blood Glucose

The Importance Of Self-monitoring Blood Glucose

Club Insider Clinical Self-testing your blood glucose levels is an important component to help you take charge of your diabetes. What is blood sugar testing? For use by known diabetics, a blood sugar (glucose) test tells you how much sugar is in your blood at the time it is tested. To determine how much glucose is in your blood, you can self-test using a blood glucose monitor (BGM). Testing your blood sugar with an accurate BGM can give you the information you’ll need to know if your meal plan, exercise schedule and medications are working to help you manage your diabetes. How can blood sugar testing help me? Self-testing can be an important component in helping you learn what makes your blood sugar too high or too low. When your blood sugar is maintained in a normal range, the risk of potentially developing diabetes-related problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, brain, feet and nerves is lowered. When should I test my blood sugar? Your health care team will help you decide when to test your blood sugar and explain how to interpret the results. The number of tests you’ll need to conduct each day is different for everyone. Since things such as eating, exercise, medications and stress can affect your blood sugar, testing at different times during the day is a good idea. One approach to checking blood sugar levels that account for these different actions is called paired testing. The idea behind paired testing is to test your blood sugar before and after an event. It’s all about home experiments, each one lasting a few days in a row. Each experiment should focus on one specific action; for example, you can check how your favorite breakfast affects your blood sugar. The more you know about how daily actions affect your levels, the better you can take charge of your Continue reading >>

> Diabetes Control: Why It's Important

> Diabetes Control: Why It's Important

You've probably heard your child's doctor talk a lot about "diabetes control," which usually refers to how close the blood sugar, or glucose, is kept to the desired range. What does this mean and why is it important? Too much or not enough sugar in the bloodstream can lead to short-term problems that must be treated right away, like hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, or diabetic ketoacidosis. Too much sugar in the bloodstream also can cause long-term damage to body tissues. For example, it can harm blood vessels that supply blood to vital organs, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems. These problems don't usually affect kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. But they can happen in adults with diabetes, particularly if they haven't managed or controlled their diabetes properly. Kids with diabetes who don't control their blood sugar levels may also have problems with growth and development. They might even have a delay in when puberty starts. Puberty is when the body changes as kids start growing into adults. Also important is avoiding frequent and/or severe episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), which can interfere with participation in school and other activities, making it hard for kids to cope with their diabetes and achieve a healthy, happy childhood and adulthood. Controlling diabetes means keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. It's a three-way balancing act: Your child's diabetes medicines (such as insulin), food, and activity level all need to be balanced to keep blood sugar levels under control. If any one of these is off, blood sugar levels will be, too. In general, poorly controlled blood sugar levels can be due to any of the following: Continue reading >>

When Should I Check My Blood Sugar?

When Should I Check My Blood Sugar?

Maybe you have diabetes. It is not too uncommon nowadays. After informing you of this diagnosis, someone in the doctor’s office probably reviewed how to check your blood sugar: They showed you how to put the unused strip into the meter and stick your finger for a small amount of blood— the basics are probably very clear. Sometimes the doctor’s assistant spends so much time talking about how to use the machine that they forget to tell the patient the correct time to check their sugar. We will cover some general rules about the correct timing of fingerstick blood sugar checks. These apply to most people with diabetes. There are two times that are the most valuable to test for blood sugar: Doctors often simplify this timing by instructing patients to check their sugar level in the blood before meals and at bed time. Why would your doctor prescribe these more simplified instructions? Checking before meals and at bedtime works well because: It is easier to remember. Most people stop what they are doing to eat a meal and are more likely to remember they need to check before than they are to remember 2 hours after eating. Bedtime is another time when things slow down and people tend to remember to check their sugar. The simplified meal and bedtime method offers the most information with the fewest number of fingerstick checks. The blood sugar check two hours after eating a meal is not really necessary because of the timing, occurring so closely to the next meal. For example: if a patient checks their blood sugar before breakfast at 9AM, the next check would be due two hours later, at 11AM. If they plan to have lunch at 12 PM and check it 15 minutes before this meal, these last two checks would be very close (within 45 minutes) to each other. The rule of ALTERNATING: Anot Continue reading >>

Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them To Manage Your Diabetes

Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them To Manage Your Diabetes

Checking your blood sugar, also called blood glucose, is an important part of diabetes care. This tip sheet tells you: why it helps you to know your blood sugar numbers how to check your blood sugar levels what are target blood sugar levels what to do if your levels are too low or too high how to pay for these tests Why do I need to know my blood sugar numbers? Your blood sugar numbers show how well your diabetes is managed. And managing your diabetes means that you have less chance of having serious health problems, such as kidney disease and vision loss. As you check your blood sugar, you can see what makes your numbers go up and down. For example, you may see that when you are stressed or eat certain foods, your numbers go up. And, you may see that when you take your medicine and are active, your numbers go down. This information lets you know what is working for you and what needs to change. How is blood sugar measured? There are two ways to measure blood sugar. Blood sugar checks that you do yourself. These tell you what your blood sugar level is at the time you test. The A1C (A-one-C) is a test done in a lab or at your provider’s office. This test tells you your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months. How do I check my blood sugar? You use a blood glucose meter to check your blood sugar. This device uses a small drop of blood from your finger to measure your blood sugar level. You can get the meter and supplies in a drug store or by mail. Read the directions that come with your meter to learn how to check your blood sugar. Your health care team also can show you how to use your meter. Write the date, time, and result of the test in your blood sugar record. Take your blood sugar record and meter to each visit and talk about your results with your h Continue reading >>

Why It Is Important To Check Your Blood Glucose Regularly

Why It Is Important To Check Your Blood Glucose Regularly

Checking your blood glucose levels regularly is one of the most important things you can do if you have diabetes. Knowing your blood glucose levels throughout the day allows you to make the best possible decisions for managing your diabetes. These are the times when you should test: Before a Meal Testing your blood glucose before a meal tells you how much insulin you might need in order to treat a high blood sugar, or to bring your glucose levels up. If you do not use insulin, this information will help you better understand how effective your current dosage is, or if you need to adjust your diabetes management plan. After a Meal Testing your blood sugar a couple of hours after eating tells you if your insulin calculations were correct, or if you need to treat your blood glucose levels. For example, if your blood glucose levels are still high 2-3 hours after a meal, you might need to correct with insulin. This information can also help your healthcare team decide whether or not to increase or decrease your medication levels. Before and After Exercising Test your blood glucose levels before you exercise, because if your levels are low at the start, you might need a small snack before you begin. Testing afterwards tells you how your body reacts to certain types of exercise. Does cardio lower your blood sugar, but weight training raises it? Or is it the other way around? You should know how each form of exercise effects your body. Before Bedtime Testing your blood glucose levels before bedtime can help you feel calm and relaxed knowing that your blood glucose is in a comfortable range. Or it might tell you that you need a snack before bed. 3 AM Check You might be asked by your healthcare professional to check your blood glucose levels at 3:00 AM. This is to know how your b Continue reading >>

How Often To Test Your Blood Glucose

How Often To Test Your Blood Glucose

Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when Continue reading >>

The Right Way To Monitor Blood Sugar

The Right Way To Monitor Blood Sugar

People with diabetes must monitor blood sugar, also called blood glucose, to better manage their condition. Checking blood sugar periodically throughout the day can provide a picture of the effects that food, stress, medicines, and activity level have on blood glucose levels. With this information, a person with diabetes can stay healthier. Good blood sugar control can delay or even prevent serious complications of diabetes such as kidney failure and the consequences of nerve damage that can ultimately lead to amputation. When you monitor blood sugar levels, you learn what the normal range of blood glucose is for you, and how far below or above that level you are. Your blood sugar level will give you an idea of how well your treatment plan is working. How often you need to monitor blood sugar varies from individual to individual and should be guided by your doctor’s advice. For example, many people who take insulin need to test blood sugar three or four times per day, while other treatment regimens demand less frequent monitoring. When you are ill or keeping an irregular schedule, you may need to test more frequently. The ultimate goal when you monitor blood sugar is to hit your ideal blood glucose target level, which your doctor will determine for you. If your blood glucose readings are not ideal, you may need to alter your medication dosage and diet. Monitoring With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Blood sugar monitoring is important both for people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is the result of an autoimmune disorder; your body's immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that enables your body to convert the food you eat into energy. People with type 1 always need to take insulin because their Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Checking Blood Sugar Levels

The Importance Of Checking Blood Sugar Levels

Besides helping to keep blood sugar levels (also known as blood glucose levels) under control, checking them according to the diabetes management plan will help you and your child: feel more aware and in control of what is happening with your child's diabetes prevent short-term diabetes symptoms and future health problems troubleshoot problems and make adjustments to the diabetes management plan more promptly and effectively manage sick days gain a better understanding of the impact of food, exercise, and medications on the blood sugar levels When and How Often How often you should test your child's blood sugar levels each day — and when — will depend on a number of things and can even change from day to day. In general, most kids with diabetes test their blood sugar levels before breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and at bedtime. They may need to check more often when they're sick or if there are changes in their diabetes treatment or daily habits. They may also need to check more often if they use an insulin pump or another management plan that aims for very close control of blood sugar levels. The diabetes health care team can advise you on how often and when to check. Sometimes parents need to check their child's blood sugar levels in the middle of the night. For example, kids having problems with hypoglycemia episodes may need middle-of-the-night tests. And those who've just been diagnosed with diabetes may need more frequent tests while they and their families are learning how insulin or other diabetes medicines affect blood sugar levels. Continue reading >>

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) is the amount of glucose in your blood at a given time. It is important to check your blood glucose (sugar) levels, because it will: Provide a quick measurement of your blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Determine if you have a high or low blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Show you how your lifestyle and medication affect your blood glucose (sugar) levels; and Help you and your diabetes health-care team to make lifestyle and medication changes that will improve your blood glucose (sugar) levels. How often should you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels? How frequently you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels should be decided according to your own treatment plan. You and your health-care provider can discuss when and how often you should check your blood glucose (sugar) levels. Checking your blood glucose (sugar) levels is also called Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG). How do you test your blood glucose levels? A blood glucose (sugar) meter is used to check your blood glucose (sugar) at home. You can get these meters at most pharmacies or from your diabetes educator. Talk with your diabetes educator or pharmacist about which one is right for you. Once you receive a meter, ensure you receive the proper training before you begin to use it. Ask your health-care provider about: How and where to draw blood How to use and dispose of lancets (the device that punctures your skin) The size of the drop of blood needed The type of blood glucose (sugar) strips to use How to clean the meter How to check if the meter is accurate How to code your meter (if needed) Note: Your province or territory may subsidize the cost of blood glucose (sugar) monitoring supplies. Contact your local Diabetes Canada branch to find out if this appli Continue reading >>

5 Things A Blood-sugar Test Can Do For You

5 Things A Blood-sugar Test Can Do For You

If you're like a lot of people with type 2 diabetes, you may not be sure exactly why it's so important to test your blood sugar daily. Glucose Meters"This may save your life" Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring In a study published in 2007 in BMJ (British Medical Journal), researchers analyzed the blood glucose monitoring habits of 18 patients with type 2 diabetes over a three year period. At the end of the study, eight out of 18 had developed "monitoring fatigue" and were not testing their blood sugar regularly. The reason? They weren't sure how to interpret high readings or what to do about them. What's more, they thought their doctor was more focused on hemoglobin A1C and seemed uninterested in the daily blood-sugar results. In fact, checking your blood sugar daily can: Tell you what to eat next time: Checking blood sugar before and after a meal can determine if the food you're eating is a problem. Rice or corn, for instance, can send blood sugar way up, not just hot fudge sundaes, says Jane Nelson Bolin, PhD, of Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Rural Public Health. The American Diabetes Association suggests a premeal blood-sugar range of 90 mg/dl to 130 mg/dl and a postmeal blood glucose level below 180 mg/dl. Give you a sense of control: Trudy Schoepko, 66, of Albuquerque, N.M., has monitored her blood sugar twice a day religiously since she was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes almost four years ago. "What this whole thing did for me is give me a real sense of there is something in my life I can control, that I have power over it instead of it having power over me." Let you know you're getting sick: Schoepko's blood sugar can also tell her when she's getting sick. Once her blood sugars were in the 190s (very high) and two days later she was diagnose Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood Sugar Testing: Why, When And How

Blood sugar testing is an important part of diabetes care. Find out when to test your blood sugar level, how to use a testing meter, and more. If you have diabetes, self-testing your blood sugar (blood glucose) can be an important tool in managing your treatment plan and preventing long-term complications of diabetes. You can test your blood sugar at home with a portable electronic device (glucose meter) that measures sugar level in a small drop of your blood. Why test your blood sugar Blood sugar testing — or self-monitoring blood glucose — provides useful information for diabetes management. It can help you: Judge how well you're reaching overall treatment goals Understand how diet and exercise affect blood sugar levels Understand how other factors, such as illness or stress, affect blood sugar levels Monitor the effect of diabetes medications on blood sugar levels Identify blood sugar levels that are high or low When to test your blood sugar Your doctor will advise you on how often you should check your blood sugar level. In general, the frequency of testing depends on the type of diabetes you have and your treatment plan. Type 1 diabetes. Your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing four to eight times a day if you have type 1 diabetes. You may need to test before meals and snacks, before and after exercise, before bed, and occasionally during the night. You may also need to check your blood sugar level more often if you are ill, change your daily routine or begin a new medication. Type 2 diabetes. If you take insulin to manage type 2 diabetes, your doctor may recommend blood sugar testing two or more times a day, depending on the type and amount of insulin you need. Testing is usually recommended before meals, and sometimes before bedtime. If you manage type 2 Continue reading >>

What Is Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)?

What Is Levemir® (insulin Detemir [rdna Origin] Injection)?

Do not share your Levemir® FlexTouch® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Never inject Levemir® into a vein or muscle. Do not share your Levemir FlexTouch with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. Before taking Levemir®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should ch Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Monitoring Blood-glucose Levels

The Importance Of Monitoring Blood-glucose Levels

Since your doctor told you that you have diabetes, you’ve had to make a few changes to your habits. Among other things, you probably now have to use a small device called blood glucose meter. Are you aware of the importance of monitoring your blood-glucose levels regularly? Essential facts about diabetes Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects the way the body treats glucose (sugar) in the blood. In the case of type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot produce insulin, a hormone that allows the body’s cells to use glucose and produce energy. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is a two-part affliction: first, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, and second, insulin can no longer play its role properly because the body’s cells are unaffected by it (insulin resistance). People suffering from diabetes, no matter what type, have to be followed by a doctor for life. Type 2 diabetes can, in some cases, initially be controlled by healthy eating habits, weight loss and increased physical activity. Many people with type 2 diabetes, however, will eventually have to take medication; it is most often taken orally, but sometimes it is administered by injection, such as insulin. For its part, treating type 1 diabetes is essentially based on daily insulin injections. Oral medication is not effective for this type of diabetes. Why is it important to control blood-glucose levels? Many people who live with diabetes don’t feel any particular symptoms, unless they are experiencing hyperglycemia (glucose level is too high) or hypoglycemia (glucose level is too low). Hyperglycemia can cause significant damage to some organs, which then leads to complications of diabetes. These include: cardiac or vascular event, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack) or stroke; kidney pr Continue reading >>

Why You Should Test Your Blood Sugar – Even If You’re Not Diabetic!

Why You Should Test Your Blood Sugar – Even If You’re Not Diabetic!

I’m pretty excited about Robb Wolf’s new book, Wired to Eat, and have just released a podcast where he and I chat about lentils, blood sugar, and “why” (I’ll get to that later in the post, or you can listen to the show). Before I talk more about the book, I thought I’d give you a little context on why I’m such a huge advocate of it… (and if you’re not interested in my story, skip down to “The Basic Gist of the Book”) I’ve always had blood sugar control issues. I think it goes back to being an undiagnosed Celiac as a kid, and constantly being hungry. I mean, I was starving ALL THE TIME. I could have eaten a full Thanksgiving dinner at any point during the day, and then some. I was really underweight as a kid, but always had a little belly. I also had a host of other issues like low muscle tone, hyper mobile joints, reading and attention problems, and had such low blood pressure that I’d sometimes randomly pass out. My small town, egocentric pediatrician declared I had lactose intolerance, and so he told my mother to give me diluted soy formula instead of milk. My daily meals looked something like this: Frosted Flakes with soy milk and orange juice plus banana for breakfast, canned chicken noodle soup for lunch, and Hamburger Helper for dinner. Rarely did we have fresh vegetables or a “from scratch” meal. My mom worked, and thought that homemaking was not for “modern women,” so my kitchen was stocked with Hungry Man dinners (you know, the ones in the tin foil) and Ritz crackers, “cheese spread” and the occasional bag of frozen string beans. During my 20’s, I went nearly vegetarian in college. I loved my deep fried tofu, lentils, and deep bowls of soba noodles. I never fully made it to completely plant-based, purely because my body c Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar