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Why Does Losing Weight Help With Diabetes?

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Perhaps you have learned that you have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes. You might be overweight or have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Maybe you had gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. These are just a few examples of factors that can raise your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and eye and foot problems. Prediabetes also can cause health problems. The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be delayed or even prevented. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to develop health problems, so delaying diabetes by even a few years will benefit your health. You can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing a modest amount of weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being physically active most days of the week. Ask your doctor if you should take the diabetes drug metformin to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.1 How can I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows that you can do a lot to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Here are some things you can change to lower your risk: Lose weight and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of your starting weight.1 For instance, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose about 10 to 14 pounds. Move more. Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. If you have not been active, talk with your health care professional about which activities are best. Start slowly to build up to your goal. Eat healthy foods most of the time. Eat smaller portions to reduce the amount of calories you Continue reading >>

How Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. An analysis published in The BMJ aims to let doctors and the public in on a little-known secret: Type 2 diabetes, in many cases, is curable. People can reverse their diabetes by losing about 33 pounds, say the authors of the new paper, despite popular belief that the diagnosis is always a permanent one. If more people were striving for this goal, and if more doctors were documenting instances of diabetes remission, complication rates and health-care costs could both be reduced dramatically, the authors say. The analysis is based on evidence from recent clinical trials. In one from 2011, people who were recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes returned their blood sugar levels to normal when they lost weight on a calorie-restrictive diet. In a 2016 follow-up study, people who had been diabetic for up to 10 years were able to reverse their condition when they lost about 33 pounds. TIME Health Newsletter Get the latest health and science news, plus: burning questions and expert tips. View Sample Sign Up Now Mike Lean, professor of human nutrition at the University of Glasgow in Scotland, is an author of both the new analysis and of those earlier trials. He says a person’s likelihood of remission from diabetes is greatest in the first five years after being diagnosed. Type 2 diabetes, he wrote in an email, is a disease “best avoided by avoiding the weight gain that drives it.” For people who do develop it, he believes that evidence-based weight-loss programs could help them achieve lasting remission. “Not all can do it, but they should all be given the chance with good support,” Lean writes. “Taking tablets or injections for life to reduce blood sugar is a poor second rate treatment.” Current guidelines for the managemen Continue reading >>

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

People with diabetes receive mixed messages about weight loss from magazines, newspapers, friends, family, and, yes, even health professionals. Few subjects have accumulated as much misleading and potentially dangerous folklore as the subject of obesity. A common message is that losing weight is just a matter of willpower, and if you have been losing weight and reach a plateau, it's because you've lost your willpower and are no longer following your diet. Furthermore, for people with type 2 diabetes, the message often is that weight loss is the answer to improving glucose control: “If you just lose 20 lb, you won't need insulin.” What does research tell us about these issues, and what should our messages as health professionals be to people with diabetes? Obesity is a serious worldwide problem and is associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Today, more than 1.1 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese.1 In the past 20 years, the rates of obesity have tripled in developing countries that have adopted a Western lifestyle, with the Middle East, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, India, and China facing the greatest increase. Consequently, the number of people with diabetes in these countries is expected to increase from 84 million in 2000 to 228 million by 2030. Thus, preventing obesity is a high priority for the prevention of diabetes and other chronic diseases. According to some obesity researchers, it may not be possible to decrease the current numbers of overweight and obese people in the United States, but we need to try to slow or prevent the increase that has been occurring at an alarming rate.2 The hope is that slowing the rising prevalence of obesity will also slow the diabetes epidemic. Can this be accomplished? Thus fa Continue reading >>

6 Ways Weight Loss Can Help Control Diabetes

6 Ways Weight Loss Can Help Control Diabetes

Losing 5 to 10 percent of your body weight might help you better manage your type 2 diabetes and keep blood sugar levels under control. Here’s how. Thinkstock Maintaining a healthy weight has its obvious health benefits — but it can also help you better manage your type 2 diabetes. In fact, losing weight can bolster your blood sugar control and lower your risk for diabetes complications like high blood pressure and plaque buildup in the arteries. Nudging down the number on the scale by just 5 to 10 percent has also been shown to help some people reduce the amount of diabetes medication they need, according to an article published in Diabetes Care in June 2015. “Weight loss is very high on the priority list,” says Joanne Rinker, RD, CDE, LDN, senior director for community health improvement at Population Health Improvement Partners in Morrisville, North Carolina, and a spokeswoman for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Rinker admits that dropping pounds isn’t easy, but when you succeed, you’ll reap a host of health benefits, such as: Improved insulin resistance. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t properly respond to the insulin produced by the pancreas, and your blood glucose levels go up. That’s called insulin resistance, and it’s linked to excess weight. When you drop the extra pounds, your body becomes more efficient and can use the insulin more easily, Rinker explains. As a result, insulin resistance goes down, which is a good thing for diabetes management. Better A1C results. Since insulin sensitivity improves with weight loss, you’ll see better results when your doctor does an A1C test, which provides a picture of your blood glucose levels over the previous three months. “This is why lifestyle change through diet and exercise Continue reading >>

6 Tips For Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes

6 Tips For Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes

The benefits of a healthy weight Thinking of dropping a few pounds? If you’re overweight and have diabetes, it’s one of the best things you can do for your overall health. A study at the Kaiser Permanente’s Center for Health Research in Oregon found that people who shed weight within about 18 months of being diagnosed with type-2 diabetes were more likely to keep long-term control over their blood pressure and glucose levels. When you have diabetes, a healthy weight reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease and actually helps your body’s own insulin to work better. “In addition, people who lose weight generally feel better. It’s value added!” says Dr. Ian Blumer, a diabetes specialist in Ajax, Ontario, and author of Diabetes for Canadians for Dummies. Want work towards a healthy number on the scale? These six tips will help you reach your goal. 1. Talk to your healthcare team Let your dietitian, nurse educator and/or doctor know that you’re taking on the task of losing weight. “Find out if there should be some change in your therapy,” says Blumer. Your healthcare professional can also help you set reasonable goals. Fad diets are definitely not recommended. But if you do plan to make drastic changes to your daily menu, it’s critically important you have medical guidance, Blumer says. “Before adopting a low-carb diet, a doctor should be consulted as certain medications-such as insulin-may need to be adjusted in order to avoid low blood glucose.” 2. Count your calories Losing weight means cutting calories, but it doesn’t have to mean eliminating everything you love to eat. Just eat smaller portions, and focus on low-fat foods. Try keeping a record of what you’re eating and how many calories you’re consuming. That way you’ll be able to id Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It?

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It?

Topic Overview Can you "reverse" type 2 diabetes? Can you cure it? Diabetes can go into remission. When diabetes is in remission, you have no signs or symptoms of it. But your risk of relapse is higher than normal.1 That's why you make the same daily healthy choices that you do for active type 2 diabetes. Is there a cure for diabetes? There is no known cure for type 2 diabetes. But it can be controlled. And in some cases, it goes into remission. For some people, a diabetes-healthy lifestyle is enough to control their blood sugar levels. That means losing weight if you are overweight, eating healthy foods, and being more active. But most people with type 2 diabetes also need to take one or more medicines or insulin. Of those people who don't need diabetes medicine, some find that their diabetes does "reverse" with weight control, diabetes-healthy eating, and exercise. Their bodies are still able to make and use insulin, and their blood sugar levels go back to normal. Their diabetes is in remission. "Complete remission" is 1 year or more of normal A1c and fasting glucose levels without using diabetes medicine. When you have complete remission, you still get tested for high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and kidney and eye problems. You do regular foot checks.1 "Prolonged remission" is 5 years or more of normal A1c and blood sugar levels without using diabetes medicine. You might have lab tests less often. But your doctor will still check on any heart, eye, foot, or other health problems you have had from diabetes, even if they are better than before.1 Remission is most likely in the early stage of diabetes or after a big weight loss. It can also happen after bariatric surgery for weight loss, which can trigger healthy changes in the body's insulin sys Continue reading >>

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

For folks with diabetes, weight loss is a natural form of “medication.” Reams of research prove that losing even just a few pounds is an effective way to control blood sugar or reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. But in an ironic twist, losing weight may be more difficult if you have type 2 diabetes. And the reason isn’t just a lack of willpower. Too often, diet plans don’t work for people with diabetes because the metabolism changes associated with blood sugar problems may increase appetite, slow down fat burning, and encourage fat storage. Now breakthrough research has revealed a better way for people to lose weight and reduce insulin resistance. The secret is a concept called intermittent fasting. British researchers created this revolutionary new diet, which strictly limits caloric intake for two days of the week but permits larger portions for the remainder. Women who followed the plan lost almost twice as much fat as those who restricted calories every day. Within three months, participants reduced insulin resistance by 25 percent more on nonfast days and inflammation by 8 percent more than people who dieted continuously. Why Does this Particular Diabetes Diet Plan Work? It counteracts the effects of “diabesity,” where blood sugar problems and excess body fat meet. Just a small amount of excess weight and a genetic tendency for metabolism problems can trigger a cascade of health issues, including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, immune system problems, and hormonal imbalances. This constellation of health problems is caused by a modern lifestyle that is out of sync with our genetic inheritance. Researchers theorize that because humans evolved during alternating periods of feast and famine, many of us inherited variou Continue reading >>

Why Am I Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes?

Why Am I Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes?

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. If you have type 2 diabetes, weight loss can be a good thing. This is assuming the weight loss is part of a balanced approach to your diabetes management, involving sound nutrition and physical activity. Why weight loss is (usually) a good thing Decreased weight is a goal usually associated with type 2 diabetes for many reasons: it helps in lowering blood sugars, decreases your risk of heart disease, and contributes to overall health, to name a few. In fact, a decrease in body weight by as little as five to 10 percent can result in tremendous benefits when talking about blood glucose and health in general. But if you have type 2 diabetes and you’ve had unintentional weight loss, take it as a warning sign, and consult your physician. More on diabetes and weight loss: How Does Losing Weight Help With Type 2 Diabetes? Weight Loss and Diabetes: A Balancing Act There are three worrisome causes of unintentional weight loss for those with type 2 diabetes: 1. Continual high blood sugar With type 2 diabetes, the body is not able to effectively get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells for use in all bodily functions. And if your type 2 diabetes is not managed or controlled, blood sugar gets high very quickly and stays high until something is done about it. If nothing is done to resolve high blood sugar, the glucose that is causing the high blood sugar can’t get into the body’s cells for energy and is excreted in the urine. In other words, if you eat carbohydrates to fuel your body, those carbohydrates that are broken down into glucose aren’t used as fuel, Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Weight loss is a common recommendation for treatment for type 2 diabetes. Many people are overweight when they’re first diagnosed, and that extra fat actually increases their insulin resistance (when their bodies can’t properly use the hormone insulin). By losing weight, people with type 2 diabetes can become less insulin resistant, and they’re able to use insulin better. (To learn more about how the hormone insulin works, read our article on how insulin regulates blood glucose levels.) If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and you're overweight, you should get started as soon as possible on a weight loss plan. It is important to work with a registered dietitian to help you figure out a plan that will work for you—a healthy meal plan, physical activity, and realistic goals will help you reach a healthy weight. There are many advantages to losing weight (and not just diabetes-related ones): Boost your energy level Lower your cholesterol levels (especially important for people with type 2 diabetes) Protect your heart (also important for people with diabetes, since heart-related complications are very common) Make it easier to control your blood glucose level As you may already know, losing weight can be a challenge, but don’t let that stop you. Do whatever you need to in order to stay motivated. It is the amount of calories we eat that contributes to weight gain. Make small changes. Learn portion sizes and reduce the amount of snacks in your day to reduce the total amount of calories you consume each day. Find cookbooks with healthier recipes using low-fat options. For a little fun, take our carb counting quiz to see how well you know the carb content of certain foods; this can help you make healthier choices. Work with a registered dietitian Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight With Diabetes

How To Lose Weight With Diabetes

It’s hard to lose weight. It can be even harder to lose weight when you have diabetes. We know the benefits of weight loss, but let’s quickly review. It reduces blood pressure, improves cholesterol levels, and takes a lot of pressure off your joints. For those with type 2 diabetes, it lowers blood sugars and may reduce or eliminate the need for medication. Substantial weight loss can add a full decade to your life. So How to Lose Weight with Diabetes? There is no magic pill, although many diabetes drugs have been found to promote weight loss. These include metformin (including Fortamet and Glucophage), Byetta, Victoza and Symlin. Most experts say that the key to weight loss is burning more calories than you consume. But that is not the full truth. Insulin and other medications can cause weight gain. There are also those who believe that some people have different types of metabolisms and respond to foods differently. Yet as many studies and programs like Weight Watchers have shown, increasing activity and reducing caloric intake can consistently lead to weight loss. What’s Worked for You? How to reduce calories or increase activity levels is intensely personal. It’s impacted by your motivation, knowledge, access to convenient exercise, friends and family, schedule, eating habits, upbringing, and so much more. So we’d like to hear your story. How did you successfully lose weight? Or, just as importantly, what hasn’t worked for you? Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Millions of people suffering from Type 2 diabetes could be cured of the disease if they just lost weight, a new study suggests. Scientists at Newcastle University have shown the disease is caused by fat accumulating in the pancreas and losing less than one gram from the organ can reverse the life-limiting illness and restore insulin production. Type 2 diabetes affects 3.3 million people in England and Wales and, until now, was thought to be chronic. It can lead to blindness, stroke, kidney failure and limb amputation. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal” Professor Roy Taylor, Newcastle University But now researchers at Newcastle have shown that the disease can be reversed, even in obese people who have had the condition for a long time. 18 obese people with Type 2 diabetes who were given gastric band surgery and put on a restricted diet for eight weeks were cured of their condition. During the trial the patients, aged between 25 and 65, lost an average of 2.2 stone, which was around 13 per cent of their body weight. Crucially they also lost 0.6 grams of fat from their pancreas, allowing the organ to secrete normal levels of insulin. The team is now planning a larger two year study involving 200 people with Glasgow University to check that the findings can be replicated and weight loss can be sustained for two years. “For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal,” said Professor Roy Taylor, of Newcastle University who also works within the Newcastle Hospitals. “So if you ask how much weight you need to lose to make your diabetes go away, the answer is one gram. But t Continue reading >>

Losing Weight Is Hard, But It’s Not Any Harder If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

Losing Weight Is Hard, But It’s Not Any Harder If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

A study has found weight loss could reverse type 2 diabetes. The UK clinical trial showed that 46% of people who followed a low-calorie diet, among other measures, for 12 months were able to stop their type 2 diabetes medications. This confirms a position outlined in a previous paper that people can beat diabetes into remission if they lost about 15 kilograms. Another study showed that prediabetes (a blood sugar level that is high, but lower than necessary for diabetes diagnosis) can be prevented by losing as little as 2kg. If weight loss isn’t already hard enough, many people think it’s more difficult if you have diabetes. One small study perhaps sowed the seed for this defeatist idea. A dozen overweight diabetic subjects and their overweight non-diabetic spouses were treated together in a behavioural weight-control program. After 20 weeks, the diabetic group lost 7.4kg on average while their non-diabetic spouses lost 13.4kg. But there’s more to this story than meets the eye. In fact, losing weight with type 2 diabetes is no harder than it is without it. Where does this idea comes from? Type 2 diabetes triples the risk of heart attack and stroke, and is the leading cause of blindness, amputations and kidney failure. Treatment with modern drugs improves the outlook, but complications still develop and life expectancy is substantially reduced, especially for younger people. So beating it into remission is the ultimate goal of management. If weight loss helps reach that goal, people need to know if it’s harder to achieve than without diabetes. From all the information out there you might think it is. In diabetes, the fat-burning mitochondria (the powerhouse of our cells) may be more sluggish and hunger hormones may be out of whack. Read more: What are mitochondria Continue reading >>

> Weight And Diabetes

> Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it to the muscles. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of it through urine. This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 diabetes have a condition called ins Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms Reversed: This Could Lower Blood Sugar And Help Weight Loss

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms Reversed: This Could Lower Blood Sugar And Help Weight Loss

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body can’t use insulin effectively or when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin. This means glucose - or sugar - stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel. If glucose builds up in the blood it can lead to hyperglycaemia which is toxic to organs. Now experts believe the condition could be treated by implanting sponges into fat tissue. A study has shown that in obese mice with type 2 diabetes symptoms, the implant reduced weight gain and blood sugar levels. The research was presented at the National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. Experts said the sponges, which are made of poly(lactide-co-glycolide), or PLG, help to reduce fat and lower blood sugar levels. “We’re approaching diabetes as tissue engineers,” said Professor Michael Gower, fro the University of South Carolina. “When people eat poorly, don’t exercise and are under a lot of stress, they gain weight. “When fat stores get too large, communication with other parts of the body breaks down and can lead to diabetes. What we’re trying to do is restart that conversation.” Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The experts set out to see what impact the sponges had on fat - in a bid to stimulate communication from fat to other organs and tissues. The sponges deliver pancreatic islets - or cells which stimulate hormones - into the fat. Michael Hendley, a doctoral student in Gower's USC lab, implanted PLG sponges in large abdominal fat pads in obese mice that had developed symptoms resembling those of Type 2 diabetes. In one week, the mice's fat cells, immune cells and blood vessels filled the Continue reading >>

How To Reverse A Diabetes Diagnosis By Losing Weight

How To Reverse A Diabetes Diagnosis By Losing Weight

Here's something shocking to think about: 40 percent of Americans are obese — and that number is the highest it's ever been. And here's another jaw-dropping statistic: 29 million Americans have type 2 diabetes. If you fall into either of these categories, the good news is there are simple steps you can take to make lasting changes. For example, you only need to lose 5 percent of your body weight to seriously start reducing your risk for type 2 diabetes. And you only need to lose 1 gram of fat from your pancreas (where your insulin lives) to reverse the symptoms of diabetes, according to one small study. The connection between a small amount of weight loss with a large health benefit is not new. A 2012 study found reducing body mass index (BMI) by just five units could help reverse diabetes, regardless of your initial BMI. Diabetes can be a confusing topic — here are a few things you should know. There are two very different types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes involves the absence of insulin, a critical hormone needed to help control blood sugar levels. It has often been referred to as juvenile diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes. Type 1 diabetes represents a very small percentage of total diabetes cases and has nothing to do with being overweight or obese. The other form is called type 2 diabetes (often referred to as adult onset or noninsulin dependent). Type 2 diabetes makes up 95 percent of all diabetes cases and it’s highly correlated to weight. Individuals with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but the hormone is not sensitive enough to the rise and fall of blood sugar levels. This form of the disease may start as insulin resistance or prediabetes. Both types of diabetes are serious and can lead to several adverse health outcomes, like nerve damage, impaired Continue reading >>

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