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Why Does Losing Weight Help With Diabetes?

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Perhaps you have learned that you have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes. You might be overweight or have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Maybe you had gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. These are just a few examples of factors that can raise your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and eye and foot problems. Prediabetes also can cause health problems. The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be delayed or even prevented. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to develop health problems, so delaying diabetes by even a few years will benefit your health. You can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing a modest amount of weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being physically active most days of the week. Ask your doctor if you should take the diabetes drug metformin to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.1 How can I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows that you can do a lot to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Here are some things you can change to lower your risk: Lose weight and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of your starting weight.1 For instance, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose about 10 to 14 pounds. Move more. Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. If you have not been active, talk with your health care professional about which activities are best. Start slowly to build up to your goal. Eat healthy foods most of the time. Eat smaller portions to reduce the amount of calories you Continue reading >>

How To Reverse A Diabetes Diagnosis By Losing Weight

How To Reverse A Diabetes Diagnosis By Losing Weight

Here's something shocking to think about: 40 percent of Americans are obese — and that number is the highest it's ever been. And here's another jaw-dropping statistic: 29 million Americans have type 2 diabetes. If you fall into either of these categories, the good news is there are simple steps you can take to make lasting changes. For example, you only need to lose 5 percent of your body weight to seriously start reducing your risk for type 2 diabetes. And you only need to lose 1 gram of fat from your pancreas (where your insulin lives) to reverse the symptoms of diabetes, according to one small study. The connection between a small amount of weight loss with a large health benefit is not new. A 2012 study found reducing body mass index (BMI) by just five units could help reverse diabetes, regardless of your initial BMI. Diabetes can be a confusing topic — here are a few things you should know. There are two very different types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes involves the absence of insulin, a critical hormone needed to help control blood sugar levels. It has often been referred to as juvenile diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes. Type 1 diabetes represents a very small percentage of total diabetes cases and has nothing to do with being overweight or obese. The other form is called type 2 diabetes (often referred to as adult onset or noninsulin dependent). Type 2 diabetes makes up 95 percent of all diabetes cases and it’s highly correlated to weight. Individuals with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but the hormone is not sensitive enough to the rise and fall of blood sugar levels. This form of the disease may start as insulin resistance or prediabetes. Both types of diabetes are serious and can lead to several adverse health outcomes, like nerve damage, impaired Continue reading >>

Weight Management And Diabetes: Should You Lose Weight?

Weight Management And Diabetes: Should You Lose Weight?

For individuals with diabetes who are overweight or obese, moderate weight loss can help improve insulin resistance and glycemic outcomes. Modest weight loss means losing about 5 to 7 percent of your weight. For example, at a weight of 165 pounds, modest weight loss would equate to shedding 8 pounds. Losing this amount of weight may improve how your body responds to insulin and your overall glucose levels. Finding Your BMI Many people don't know their current weight or if they are at a healthy weight, overweight or obese status. Do a quick check to calculate body mass index with this formula: [weight (in pounds) x 703] / [height (in inches)2] or use the Academy BMI calculator. For example, an individual at 5 feet and 6 inches tall weighing 165 pounds (165 x 703) / (662) has a BMI of 26.6, which is in the overweight category. BMI Weight Status Below 18.5 Underweight 18.5 to 24.9 Normal or Healthy Weight 25.0 to 29.9 Overweight Over 29.9 Obese In addition to BMI, other physical measurements, such as body fat percentage, distribution of body fat and waist circumference, are important methods of assessing overweight and obesity. It is unclear if weight loss alone has a significant impact on glycemic control. Research has found improvements in HgA1c and blood lipids such as triglycerides and cholesterol with weight loss in some people with diabetes but not others. Controlling blood sugar is the best way to manage diabetes. Eating right and getting enough physical activity are important for diabetes management. With your registered dietitian nutritionist and diabetes health care team, you will choose a treatment plan that is best for you. Together you have the best chance for success. The bottom line is that modest weight loss may help improve your diabetes outcomes if you ar Continue reading >>

How Does Losing Weight Help With Type 2 Diabetes?

How Does Losing Weight Help With Type 2 Diabetes?

When you were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your healthcare provider probably told you to lose weight if you’re too heavy. What they may not have told you was how much weight you need to lose, why losing weight helps with diabetes care, and how to successfully lose the weight. Here’s what to know about losing weight to help with diabetes. How much weight do you need to lose? Among people with type 2 diabetes, eight out of every 10 are overweight (BMI between 25 and 29.9) or obese (BMI over 30) at diagnosis. According to WebMD, losing just five to 10 percent of your body weight can significantly improve health. American Diabetes Association guidelines call for 10 to 15 pounds. So you don’t have to get all the way back down to the weight on your driver’s license, but you do need to try to make a change. Why will losing weight help with diabetes care? Those who follow the guidelines of losing either five to 10 percent of their body weight or 10 to 15 pounds may experience: • Lower blood sugar • Reduced insulin resistance • Lower blood pressure • Lower cholesterol • Decreased stress on hips, knees, ankles, and feet • Increased energy These benefits are all very important if you have type 2 diabetes (or even if you don’t). In some cases, people have been able to improve their blood sugars through diet and exercise enough that they can, with their doctor’s approval, reduce or eliminate medication or insulin. Even if you continue to need medication as a part of your treatment plan, improving your heart health and increasing the amount of energy you have to enjoy your day and manage your condition will greatly improve your quality of life. How do you lose the weight? Set realistic weight loss goals, but aim for a minimum of five percent of your body we Continue reading >>

Losing Weight Can Have Big Impact On Those With Diabetes

Losing Weight Can Have Big Impact On Those With Diabetes

Losing Weight Can Have Big Impact on Those with Diabetes December 14, 2012 Dear Mayo Clinic: Can type 2 diabetes be cured just by losing weight? Answer: Losing weight can have a big impact on diabetes. Although it might not cure type 2 diabetes in every case, getting to a healthy body weight does have that potential for many people. Even if it doesn't completely cure the disease, losing weight may make it possible for people with diabetes to take less medication. It often helps manage or prevent some of the health problems that can come with diabetes, too. People who have diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. This happens because of a problem with the hormone called insulin. Insulin is made in the pancreas — a gland located just behind the stomach. When you eat, the pancreas releases insulin into your bloodstream. The insulin allows sugar to enter your cells, lowering the amount of sugar in your blood. If you have type 2 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin or your body cannot use insulin as well as it should. So sugar cannot move into your cells. Instead, it builds up in your blood. The reason why type 2 diabetes develops is not completely clear. But being overweight plays a role. In people who are overweight, the body sometimes needs as much as two to three times more insulin than it would if it was at a healthy weight. In those who develop diabetes, that is more insulin than the pancreas is able to produce. When the pancreas tries to make that much insulin, it is pushed beyond its capacity and insulin-producing cells start to die. That makes the situation worse because the pancreas then has even fewer cells with which to make insulin. Compounding the problem, research also has shown that fat cells of people who are obese and who have more abdo Continue reading >>

Digestive Weight Loss Center

Digestive Weight Loss Center

Diabetes is a very serious disease that causes high blood sugar levels (elevated blood glucose). The American Diabetes Association estimates that about eight percent of Americans suffer from diabetes. Diabetes: What You Need to Know People with diabetes have an increased risk of strokes, heart attacks, high-blood pressure, kidney disease and blindness. If you are obese, you can reduce your risk of developing diabetes by eating a low-fat, low-sugar diet and exercising regularly. If you can lose 5-10 percent of your body weight, you will lower your risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent. Johns Hopkins can help you lose this weight with our weight loss services, including behavior modification, nutritional counseling and a new, special endoscopic procedure. Learn more about our weight loss services. Types of Diabetes There are three types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and gestational (diabetes that occurs during pregnancy). Type 1 typically occurs during childhood. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type and is linked to obesity. See a table that explains blood sugar values and types of diabetes. How diabetes is harmful Most people don’t really understand the way diabetes works, but a firm grasp of how it affects your body chemistry will help you better control the disease. Your body is made up of millions of cells, and these cells use glucose as their energy source. Your body gets glucose from the food that you eat. After a meal, your body secrets a hormone called insulin into your blood; insulin works as a signal to let your cells know that glucose is on the way to feed your cells. But, for people with diabetes, the signals that tell the cells to absorb the sugar are defective, or the body does not make enough insulin. As a result, high levels of glucose remain in the Continue reading >>

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Finding Your Trouble Spots You’re trying hard to lose weight. You’ve changed your eating habits, and you’ve been doing more physical activity than you used to. But a few weeks — or even a few months — have gone by, and the scale isn’t budging. “Why?!” you ask in frustration. “What am I doing wrong?!” Body weight is regulated mainly by the number of calories consumed and the number of calories burned off. But there are a number of other things that influence weight, and some of them can make it difficult to lose weight. This article explores what some of these are and how to overcome them. As you make the effort to lose weight, be sure you are aiming for a realistic body weight for you. A starting point for determining this is body-mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat based on height and weight. You can calculate your BMI easily with an online tool such as the one at www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi. (Note that there’s a separate BMI calculator for children and teens.) Generally, a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered normal, between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight, and 30 and higher is considered obese. However, BMI tends to overestimate body fat in athletes and other muscular people and to underestimate it in older people who have lost muscle mass. There is also some evidence that the negative health effects of overweight start at a lower BMI for Asian people. Keep in mind, too, that people come in different shapes and sizes. You don’t necessarily have to be “thin” to be healthy, but losing some excess fat can improve your health in a number of ways. Talk to your health-care team about your weight-loss goals and about what a healthy weight is for you. Frequent hypoglycemia Frequent episodes of hypoglycemia, or low blood glu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It?

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It?

Topic Overview Can you "reverse" type 2 diabetes? Can you cure it? Diabetes can go into remission. When diabetes is in remission, you have no signs or symptoms of it. But your risk of relapse is higher than normal.1 That's why you make the same daily healthy choices that you do for active type 2 diabetes. Is there a cure for diabetes? There is no known cure for type 2 diabetes. But it can be controlled. And in some cases, it goes into remission. For some people, a diabetes-healthy lifestyle is enough to control their blood sugar levels. That means losing weight if you are overweight, eating healthy foods, and being more active. But most people with type 2 diabetes also need to take one or more medicines or insulin. Of those people who don't need diabetes medicine, some find that their diabetes does "reverse" with weight control, diabetes-healthy eating, and exercise. Their bodies are still able to make and use insulin, and their blood sugar levels go back to normal. Their diabetes is in remission. "Complete remission" is 1 year or more of normal A1c and fasting glucose levels without using diabetes medicine. When you have complete remission, you still get tested for high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and kidney and eye problems. You do regular foot checks.1 "Prolonged remission" is 5 years or more of normal A1c and blood sugar levels without using diabetes medicine. You might have lab tests less often. But your doctor will still check on any heart, eye, foot, or other health problems you have had from diabetes, even if they are better than before.1 Remission is most likely in the early stage of diabetes or after a big weight loss. It can also happen after bariatric surgery for weight loss, which can trigger healthy changes in the body's insulin sys Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Losing Weight 'can Reverse Disease Long-term'

Diabetes: Losing Weight 'can Reverse Disease Long-term'

INDYPULSE Diabetes: Losing weight 'can reverse disease long-term' Patients who reverse their diabetes and then keep their weight down can remain free of the condition, new research has found. The study found that even people who have had Type 2 diabetes for up to 10 years can reverse their condition after adopting a very low calorie diet. Professor Roy Taylor, a world expert on the condition which affects two-and-a-half million people in this country and is growing, published his latest findings in the journal Diabetes Care. The Professor of Medicine and Metabolism at Newcastle University has previously shown that patients with Type 2 diabetes who successfully lose weight can reverse their condition because fat is removed from their pancreas, returning insulin production to normal. A study led by Professor Taylor five years ago showed that diabetes could be reversed by a very low calorie diet. International interest was sparked but the study only lasted eight weeks and the question remained whether the diabetes would stay away. In this new study, 30 volunteers with Type 2 diabetes embarked on the same diet of 600 to 700 calories a day. Participants lost on average 14 kilograms - just over 2 stone. Over the next six months they did not regain any weight. The group included many people with longer duration diabetes, defined as more than eight years and ranging up to 23 years. Overall, 12 patients who had had diabetes for less than 10 years reversed their condition and six months later they remained diabetes free. In fact, after six months a 13th patient had reversed their diabetes. Though the volunteers lost weight they remained overweight or obese but they had lost enough weight to remove the fat out of the pancreas and allow normal insulin production. Professor Taylor s Continue reading >>

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

For folks with diabetes, weight loss is a natural form of “medication.” Reams of research prove that losing even just a few pounds is an effective way to control blood sugar or reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. But in an ironic twist, losing weight may be more difficult if you have type 2 diabetes. And the reason isn’t just a lack of willpower. Too often, diet plans don’t work for people with diabetes because the metabolism changes associated with blood sugar problems may increase appetite, slow down fat burning, and encourage fat storage. Now breakthrough research has revealed a better way for people to lose weight and reduce insulin resistance. The secret is a concept called intermittent fasting. British researchers created this revolutionary new diet, which strictly limits caloric intake for two days of the week but permits larger portions for the remainder. Women who followed the plan lost almost twice as much fat as those who restricted calories every day. Within three months, participants reduced insulin resistance by 25 percent more on nonfast days and inflammation by 8 percent more than people who dieted continuously. Why Does this Particular Diabetes Diet Plan Work? It counteracts the effects of “diabesity,” where blood sugar problems and excess body fat meet. Just a small amount of excess weight and a genetic tendency for metabolism problems can trigger a cascade of health issues, including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, immune system problems, and hormonal imbalances. This constellation of health problems is caused by a modern lifestyle that is out of sync with our genetic inheritance. Researchers theorize that because humans evolved during alternating periods of feast and famine, many of us inherited variou Continue reading >>

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Cliff Scherb Editor’s Note: Cliff Scherb, Founder of Glucose Advisors and TriStar Athletes LLC, is a nutrition and fitness expert. He consults through virtually teaching his decision support system – Engine1 the app and its methodologies to aspiring T1 individuals and athletes. Cliff also creates custom training programs and insulin plans for endurance athletes, using Training Stress Modeling and real-time coaching. To inquire about coaching openings, FB LIVE sessions, and general questions please email [email protected] Losing weight can be difficult — add Type 1 diabetes to the mix with its daily management demands — and it’s even more of a challenge. I know, because I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for 29 years and I’m also an endurance athlete. The internet is saturated in advice on how to lose weight with or without Type 1, so it’s hard to know what is worth while and what will just waste your time — or worse, can negatively impact your health. I’m not going to declare all out war on carbohydrates, or tell you can or can’t drink your calories in the form of olive oil, or feast and fast with cayenne peppers and maple syrup. No, the real distilled learning from my years of consulting and data analysis shows that a balanced, low-insulin diet with nutrient timing and activity is the best way to lose weight with Type 1 diabetes. It also helps you maintain brain and body function as well as energy levels. If you are reading this you’ve probably already given this some thought and know why it’s important to lose weight and/or lean out, but I maintain it’s all about performance! Performing means living a longer or healthier life or if you’re an athlete, it can also translate to beating out your competition. Things that Impact w Continue reading >>

Millions Of Diabetics Could Be ‘cured’ By Losing Weight And Eating Healthier

Millions Of Diabetics Could Be ‘cured’ By Losing Weight And Eating Healthier

MILLIONS of Type 2 diabetics could be “cured” by losing weight. A study put 298 volunteers on a low-calorie soup and shakes diet. Getty - Contributor After a year, 57 per cent of those who shed from 1st 8lbs to 2st 5lbs were in remission. This rose to 86 per cent of those losing more. The weight loss enabled the pancreas, which helps control blood sugar, to work properly again. Failing to control the disease increases the risk of stroke, heart disease and limb amputations. Getty - Contributor Study leader Prof Roy Taylor, of Newcastle University, said: “Significant weight loss could result in lasting remission.” Patient Isobel Murray, 65, from North Ayrshire, lost over 3½ stones after 17 weeks on the low calorie diet and no longer needs her drugs. She said: “I am one of the lucky ones to have gone into remission. I don’t think of myself as a diabetic anymore. “When the doctors told me that my pancreas was working again, it felt fantastic.” Dr Elizabeth Robertson, from Diabetes UK, said: “These findings demonstrate the potential to transform the lives of millions of people. “We’re very encouraged by these initial results, and the building of robust evidence that remission could be achievable for some people." The NHS spent £957million on diabetes drugs last year – around £2.6million a day. Around 10 per cent of the NHS budget is spent treating diabetes and its complications. Scarlett Moffatt reveals her diabetes scare before three-stone weight loss Continue reading >>

Your Weight And Diabetes

Your Weight And Diabetes

Diabetes is a group of disorders characterized by chronic high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to the body's failure to produce any or enough insulin to regulate high glucose levels. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, which often occurs in children or adolescents, is caused by the body's inability to make insulin or type 2 diabetes, which occurs as a result of the body's inability to react properly to insulin (insulin resistance). Type 2 diabetes is more prevalent than type 1 diabetes and is therefore seen in roughly 90% of all diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes is predominantly diagnosed after the age of forty, however, it is now being found in all age ranges, including children and adolescents. The impact of diabetes goes beyond chronic hyperglycemia. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness (diabetic retinopathy), end stage kidney diseases (diabetic nephropathy) and non-traumatic lower extremity amputations (diabetic neuropathy) in working-age adults. People with diabetes are also two to four times more likely to experience cardiovascular complications and strokes. Diabetes and its related complications result in an estimated 200,000+ deaths each year, making diabetes one of the major causes of mortality in the U.S. In 2012, the NIH reported an estimated 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) living with diabetes. Of these, an estimated 8.1 million persons were unaware that they had the disease. How does my weight relate to type 2 diabetes? There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes such as age, race, pregnancy, stress, certain medications, genetics or family history, high cholesterol and obesity. However, the single best predictor of type 2 diabetes is overweight or obesity. Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms Reversed: This Could Lower Blood Sugar And Help Weight Loss

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms Reversed: This Could Lower Blood Sugar And Help Weight Loss

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body can’t use insulin effectively or when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin. This means glucose - or sugar - stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel. If glucose builds up in the blood it can lead to hyperglycaemia which is toxic to organs. Now experts believe the condition could be treated by implanting sponges into fat tissue. A study has shown that in obese mice with type 2 diabetes symptoms, the implant reduced weight gain and blood sugar levels. The research was presented at the National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. Experts said the sponges, which are made of poly(lactide-co-glycolide), or PLG, help to reduce fat and lower blood sugar levels. “We’re approaching diabetes as tissue engineers,” said Professor Michael Gower, fro the University of South Carolina. “When people eat poorly, don’t exercise and are under a lot of stress, they gain weight. “When fat stores get too large, communication with other parts of the body breaks down and can lead to diabetes. What we’re trying to do is restart that conversation.” Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The experts set out to see what impact the sponges had on fat - in a bid to stimulate communication from fat to other organs and tissues. The sponges deliver pancreatic islets - or cells which stimulate hormones - into the fat. Michael Hendley, a doctoral student in Gower's USC lab, implanted PLG sponges in large abdominal fat pads in obese mice that had developed symptoms resembling those of Type 2 diabetes. In one week, the mice's fat cells, immune cells and blood vessels filled the Continue reading >>

Why It Pays To Lose Weight If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

Why It Pays To Lose Weight If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

The point is not to get skinny. The point is to gain the benefits of exercise.(ISTOCKPHOTO) About eight out of every 10 people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, and excess weight—particularly around the bellyis a major cause of type 2 diabetes. Some people can even "cure" the disease with massive weight loss (including bariatric surgery). However, the relationship between weight and type 2 diabetes is a tricky one. Complex relationship between genes, weight, and diabetes An unexplained weight loss is sometimes a sign that's something wrong. So when you are finally diagnosed and treated you may actually gain weight. In addition, it's not clear if extra weight causes diabetes, or if some underlying genetic component contributes to both. "A lot of folks who are overweight and who are sedentary won't get diabetes. So there's an important genetic contribution to developing diabetes that's out of people's control," says William Bornstein, MD, an endocrinologist at the Emory Clinic in Atlanta. "Secondly, it may be actually harder for folks with diabetes to lose weight, that that may be part of the disease as well." Certain diabetes drugs, such as sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, and insulin, are associated with weight gain, too. However, the blood-sugar-lowering benefits of these drugs outweigh the risks of gaining weight. (Others, such as Byetta and metformin, may result in weight loss). While it may feel like the deck is stacked against youparticularly if you've lost and regained weight in the pastyou should still make an all-out effort to shed excess pounds. Now that you have type 2 diabetes, the goal isn't to get back into your high school jeans, but to prevent heart attacks, save your vision, and avoid amputations. Trying to lose weight is im Continue reading >>

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