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Why Do We Need Glucose In Our Body

Ks3 Bitesize

Ks3 Bitesize

Respiration Respiration is a chemical reaction that happens in all living cells. It is the way that energy is released from glucose, for our cells to use to keep us functioning. Remember that respiration is not the same as breathing (which is properly called ventilation). Aerobic respiration The glucose and oxygen react together in the cells to produce carbon dioxide and water. The reaction is called aerobic respiration because oxygen from the air is needed for it to work. Here is the word equation for aerobic respiration: glucose + oxygen → carbon dioxide + water (+ energy) (Energy is released in the reaction. We show it in brackets in the equation because energy is not a substance.) Now we will look at how glucose and oxygen get to the cells so that respiration can take place and how we get rid of the carbon dioxide. Glucose from food to cells Glucose is a type of carbohydrate, obtained through digestion of the food we eat. Digestion breaks food down into small molecules. These can be absorbed across the wall of the small intestine into the bloodstream. Glucose is carried round the body dissolved in blood plasma, the pale yellow liquid part of our blood. The dissolved glucose can diffuse into the cells of the body from the capillaries. Once in the cell glucose can be used in respiration. Oxygen from the air to cells When we breathe in oxygen enters the small air sacs, called alveoli, in the lungs. Oxygen diffuses from there into the bloodstream. Oxygen is not carried in the plasma, but is carried by the red blood cells. These contain a red substance called haemoglobin, which joins onto oxygen and carries it around the body in the blood, then lets it go when necessary. Like glucose, oxygen can diffuse into cells from the capillaries. Red blood cells carry oxygen arou Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Or Blood Glucose: What Does It Do?

Blood Sugar Or Blood Glucose: What Does It Do?

Blood sugar, or blood glucose, is sugar that the bloodstream carries to all the cells in the body to supply energy. Blood sugar or blood glucose measurements represent the amount of sugar being transported in the blood during one instant. The sugar comes from the food we eat. The human body regulates blood glucose levels so that they are neither too high nor too low. The blood's internal environment must remain stable for the body to function. This balance is known as homeostasis. The sugar in the blood is not the same as sucrose, the sugar in the sugar bowl. There are different kinds of sugar. Sugar in the blood is known as glucose. Blood glucose levels change throughout the day. After eating, levels rise and then settle down after about an hour. They are at their lowest point before the first meal of the day, which is normally breakfast. How does sugar get into the body's cells? When we eat carbohydrates, such as sugar, or sucrose, our body digests it into glucose, a simple sugar that can easily convert to energy. The human digestive system breaks down carbohydrates from food into various sugar molecules. One of these sugars is glucose, the body's main source of energy. The glucose goes straight from the digestive system into the bloodstream after food is consumed and digested. But glucose can only enter cells if there is insulin in the bloodstream too. Without insulin, the cells would starve. After we eat, blood sugar concentrations rise. The pancreas releases insulin automatically so that the glucose enters cells. As more and more cells receive glucose, blood sugar levels return to normal again. Excess glucose is stored as glycogen, or stored glucose, in the liver and the muscles. Glycogen plays an important role in homeostasis, because it helps our body function du Continue reading >>

Fd Healthy: Sugar & How It Affects Our Bodies!

Fd Healthy: Sugar & How It Affects Our Bodies!

FD Healthy: Sugar & How it Affects Our Bodies! The human body needs carbohydrates (also known as sugar) to stay healthy, this is a fact. We have evolved to naturally crave high sugar food as a survival mechanism; our early ancestors depended on sugar-rich fruits to not only give them an immediate energy supply, but to also assist in fat storage so they could continue to have an energy source when food was scarce. This craving for sugar that was once depended on for survival, is now playing a key role in rising levels of obesity, type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease, not to mention dozens of smaller ailments involving kidneys, joints, skin and more. This is because the amount of sugar we consume has increased so drastically that our bodies are no longer equipped to process it. To give you some numbers: In 1822 Americans consumed an average of 45 grams of sugar every five days, or the amount of sugar in one can of coke. In 2012, Americans consumed an average of 756 grams of sugar every five days, thats 130 pounds of sugar a year. This is a huge growth that translates to major stress on our bodies and their abilities to function properly, and we need our bodies to function properly in order for us to fight off disease and illness (like cancer!). There are many types of sugars and alternative sweeteners that we have developed over the years, but here I want to focus on the ones found most often in our food: glucose and fructose. These two molecules are the base of most of the sugars we use, particularly in processed foods. All carbohydrates break down into sugar in the body, that includes all grains and grain products (breads, pasta, rice, oatmeal, etc.). This is not to say that all carbohydrates are bad, as mentioned before, we need them to maintain a healthy lifes Continue reading >>

Importance Of Sugar In The Human Body

Importance Of Sugar In The Human Body

Sugar receives blame for many health problems, but without it, your body would cease to function properly. Naturally occurring sugars, such as those found in fruit, and lactose, or milk sugar, come from sources that benefit your diet. However, the sugars and syrups added during food processing and preparation, called added sugars, are viewed as a detriment to a healthy diet. Maximizing sugar’s benefits requires balancing the healthier and less wholesome sources. Sucrose, or table sugar, is the main source of sugar in most American diets. It consists of one molecule of fructose and one molecule of glucose, your body’s primary energy source. Your body cannot absorb the disaccharide, or two-sugar molecule, as is, so it must first sever the chemical link connecting the two sugars. The enzyme sucrase in your small intestine assists with the breakdown of sucrose into fructose and glucose. This allows your body to absorb them, transport them to the liver for processing and distribute them throughout the body. The hormone insulin then facilitates the uptake of glucose into cells, where it is metabolized into energy for immediate use. Stored Fuel To conserve fuel, you body stores excess glucose not needed for energy as a compound called glycogen. Through a process called glycogenesis, your liver creates glycogen chains up to hundreds of thousands of glucose molecules long connected through chemical bonds. Your body breaks down glycogen into single glucose units for energy when primary sources are not available; this typically occurs during times between meals, at night while sleeping and during workouts to prevent dangerous drops in your blood sugar. Complex Sugars The main reason sugar receives such negative criticism pertains to its lack of nutritive value. The American He Continue reading >>

Why Do Body Cells Need Glucose?

Why Do Body Cells Need Glucose?

Glucose is the most abundant sugar in humam body and simplest monosacchride with molecular formula C6H12O6. Glucose is the ubiquitous fuel in biology. It is used as an energy source through aerobic respiration,anaerobic respiration and fermentation. Glucose is the key source of energy providing 3.75kilocalories of foodenergy per gram. Through glycolysis, citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation glucose is oxidized to yield CO2 and H2O which yields energy in the form of ATP. It is the only source of fuel for brain. It’s level in the body is maintained by insulin when the concentration of glucose is high in blood due to carbohydrate rich diet insulin acts by reducing it’s level by storing it as glycogen in liver and function as secondary long term energy storage and when it’s concentration is low in blood glucagon acts by breaking the reservoir of glycogen back into glucose to be utilised by body as a source of energy. In anaerobic respiration(in the absence of oxygen) one glucose molecule produces a net gain of 2ATP molecules[4ATPs are produced during glycolysis by substrate level phosphorylation(formation of ATP/GTP by direct transfer pf phosphoryl group to ADP/GDP)] In aerobic respiration is much more profitable as it produces maximum of 30–32ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. Continue reading >>

Dear Mark: How Much Glucose Does Your Brain Really Need?

Dear Mark: How Much Glucose Does Your Brain Really Need?

116 Comments We now know that the oft-repeated “your brain only runs on glucose!” is wrong. I’ve mentioned it before, and anyone who’s taken the time to get fat-adapted on a low-carb Primal eating plan intuitively knows that your brain doesn’t need piles of glucose to work, because, well, they’re using their brain to read this sentence. Obviously, you eventually adapt and find you have sufficient (if not much improved) cognition without all those carbs. That said, some glucose is required, and that’s where people get tripped up. “Glucose is required” sounds an awful lot like “your brain only uses glucose” which usually leads to “you need lots of carbs to provide that glucose.” And that’s the question today’s edition of “Dear Mark” finds itself attempting to answer: how much glucose is required? Let’s get to it. Hi Mark, I have a little problem. Even though I’m able to function at work, maintain conversations, and go about my daily life without having segments of my brain suddenly stop working while eating Primal, my friends are worried about my brain. All they know is that the brain needs glucose. What can I tell them? How much glucose does my brain actually require to keep working? Thanks, Frank I wouldn’t be too hard on your friends. They mean well and it’s a common misconception. Instead of chiding them, rubbing their faces in the knowledge that you can function quite adequately on a high-fat diet, educate them. How much glucose the brain requires depends on the context. There’s not one single answer. If you’re on a very high fat, very low carb diet – like a traditional Inuit diet – your brain will eventually be able to use fat-derived ketones for about 50-75% of its energy requirements. Most ketones are produced in t Continue reading >>

Why Do We Need Glucose?

Why Do We Need Glucose?

Comment 12 | Share | Tweet | print | email A reader writes (or rather a commenter comments): One question which has always bothered me is, given that humans evolved on a hunter gatherer diet, and human metabolism is suited to burning ketones/fats for energy. Then why is it that we need blood glucose as an essential resource, and as a consequence insulin and all the metabolic machinery related to it. Why are vital body organs so dependent on glucose? Why evolve such a mechanism? I was just reading how quickly saliva can break down starches, and if you continue down the digestive tract a significant amount is dedicated to providing humans with the capability of dealing with carbohydrates in some fashion. Why evolve such a GI tract if carbs were only part of, if at all, of your nutritional intake? And why is blood glucose so critical to human survival, too low and you can die. I dont have a clear answer to these questions and welcome your thoughts. This is indeed a wonderful question; lets tackle it. First, a little very basic evolutionary science In the early days of life on earth the source of energy for the most primitive organisms in existence was the sun. These organisms captured the suns energy and stored it as glucose and starch (starch is simply a long chain of glucose molecules; a storage form of glucose, if you will) through the process of photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is the process whereby light energy from the sun, carbon dioxide and water combine to produce glucose and/or starch and discharge oxygen in the process. Early on the vast oceans contained plenty of inorganic oxygen acceptors, but ultimately the stockpile of these became oxidized. The oxygen from photosynthesis then began to be discharged into the atmosphere. Once a substantial level of oxygen was Continue reading >>

What Is Sugar? Is It Bad, Or Is It Necessary For Survival?

What Is Sugar? Is It Bad, Or Is It Necessary For Survival?

We love talking about carbs here at One Drop. It is, after all, carbs . But did you know that carbs and sugars are one in the same? They are deeply intertwined, right down to their chemical makeup. Sugars, in fact, are carbohydrates; every carbohydrate we eat eventually breaks down into sugar. So in the spirit of staying on topic, lets talk sugar. There are about 60 different types of sugars. The first type of sugar that comes to mind for most is the white, crystalized version added to cakes, pastries, lollipops, key lime pies, and every other sweet treat. This is whats commonly known as table sugar. And its become very good at hiding itself everywhere. (Tap this image for a full list!) If you have diabetes, like me, you know that glucose is necessary to live. We check for amounts of it in our bloodstream every day. And its not just us humans who are dependent on glucose all forms of life, right down to algae, need it to survive. But did you know that you can get glucose from kale? That it can be obtained through just about any vegetable? Even protein and fat sources? Heres how. Eat food any food and it will turn into glucose. This is true even for green veggies!For example: Cows eat grass. The grass, which creates its own glucose through photosynthesis, enters the cows body as cellulose; the cows stomach breaks down the cellulose into glucose. This gives the cow the energy it needs to survive and provide for others. Some of that glucose trickles into the milk, produced by the cow, that we drink. Its the circle of life. Or, rather, glucose. A similar process happens with just about everything we eat. (Now, thats a rather limited scientific explanation, but Im hoping to spare you the trouble of a much lengthier article.) Glucose, the most natural of all sugars, is absol Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Glucose

Everything You Need To Know About Glucose

You may know glucose by another name: blood sugar. Glucose is key to keeping the mechanisms of the body in top working order. When our glucose levels are optimal, it often goes unnoticed. But when they stray from recommended boundaries, you’ll notice the unhealthy effect it has on normal functioning. So what is glucose, exactly? It’s the simplest of the carbohydrates, making it a monosaccharide. This means it has one sugar. It’s not alone. Other monosaccharides include fructose, galactose, and ribose. Along with fat, glucose is one of the body’s preferred sources of fuel in the form of carbohydrates. People get glucose from bread, fruits, vegetables, and dairy products. You need food to create the energy that helps keep you alive. While glucose is important, like with so many things, it’s best in moderation. Glucose levels that are unhealthy or out of control can have permanent and serious effects. Our body processes glucose multiple times a day, ideally. When we eat, our body immediately starts working to process glucose. Enzymes start the breakdown process with help from the pancreas. The pancreas, which produces hormones including insulin, is an integral part of how our body deals with glucose. When we eat, our body tips the pancreas off that it needs to release insulin to deal with the rising blood sugar level. Some people, however, can’t rely on their pancreas to jump in and do the work it’s supposed to do. One way diabetes occurs is when the pancreas doesn’t produce insulin in the way it should. In this case, people need outside help (insulin injections) to process and regulate glucose in the body. Another cause of diabetes is insulin resistance, where the liver doesn’t recognize insulin that’s in the body and continues to make inappropriate am Continue reading >>

How Our Bodies Turn Food Into Energy

How Our Bodies Turn Food Into Energy

All parts of the body (muscles, brain, heart, and liver) need energy to work. This energy comes from the food we eat. Our bodies digest the food we eat by mixing it with fluids (acids and enzymes) in the stomach. When the stomach digests food, the carbohydrate (sugars and starches) in the food breaks down into another type of sugar, called glucose. The stomach and small intestines absorb the glucose and then release it into the bloodstream. Once in the bloodstream, glucose can be used immediately for energy or stored in our bodies, to be used later. However, our bodies need insulin in order to use or store glucose for energy. Without insulin, glucose stays in the bloodstream, keeping blood sugar levels high. Insulin is a hormone made by beta cells in the pancreas. Beta cells are very sensitive to the amount of glucose in the bloodstream. Normally beta cells check the blood's glucose level every few seconds and sense when they need to speed up or slow down the amount of insulin they're making and releasing. When someone eats something high in carbohydrates, like a piece of bread, the glucose level in the blood rises and the beta cells trigger the pancreas to release more insulin into the bloodstream. When insulin is released from the pancreas, it travels through the bloodstream to the body's cells and tells the cell doors to open up to let the glucose in. Once inside, the cells convert glucose into energy to use right then or store it to use later. As glucose moves from the bloodstream into the cells, blood sugar levels start to drop. The beta cells in the pancreas can tell this is happening, so they slow down the amount of insulin they're making. At the same time, the pancreas slows down the amount of insulin that it's releasing into the bloodstream. When this happens, Continue reading >>

What Is Glucose?

What Is Glucose?

Glucose comes from the Greek word for "sweet." It's a type of sugar you get from foods you eat, and your body uses it for energy. As it travels through your bloodstream to your cells, it's called blood glucose or blood sugar. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose from your blood into the cells for energy and storage. People with diabetes have higher-than-normal levels in their blood. Either they don't have enough insulin to move it through or their cells don't respond to insulin as well as they should. High blood glucose for a long period of time can damage your kidneys, eyes, and other organs. How Your Body Makes Glucose It mainly comes from foods rich in carbohydrates, like bread, potatoes, and fruit. As you eat, food travels down your esophagus to your stomach. There, acids and enzymes break it down into tiny pieces. During that process, glucose is released. It goes into your intestines where it's absorbed. From there, it passes into your bloodstream. Once in the blood, insulin helps glucose get to your cells. Energy and Storage Your body is designed to keep the level of glucose in your blood constant. Beta cells in your pancreas monitor your blood sugar level every few seconds. When your blood glucose rises after you eat, the beta cells release insulin into your bloodstream. Insulin acts like a key, unlocking muscle, fat, and liver cells so glucose can get inside them. Most of the cells in your body use glucose along with amino acids (the building blocks of protein) and fats for energy. But it's the main source of fuel for your brain. Nerve cells and chemical messengers there need it to help them process information. Without it, your brain wouldn't be able to work well. After your body has used the energy it needs, the leftover glucose is stored in little bundles Continue reading >>

What Does Glucose Do For Your Body?

What Does Glucose Do For Your Body?

Eating food is how you provide fuel to your body to stay alive. Food is digested by a complex system of organs, hormones and enzymes and eventually becomes the usable energy for your cells called glucose. Your brain and muscles must have a supply of glucose to function. The body maintains a minimal level of glucose in the blood, about 70 mg/dl, and also regulates surges of glucose, when you eat a meal, to not exceed 140 mg/dl. When you are not eating, your liver has stored glucose, called liver glycogen, readily available to keep your blood levels at a minimum functioning level. Insulin is minimally at work when there is no food, but another hormone called glucagon is responsible for breaking down the glycogen stores. Your muscles also have stored glucose, muscle glycogen that is constantly being burned for energy - more so when you move. This is the baseline of fuel that must be maintained to keep alive. When you eat a meal, and the food is digested, your blood glucose rises. Typically, two hours after a meal is the highest concentration of glucose in the blood. This rise in blood glucose signals the pancreas to release insulin from the beta cells. Insulin makes the glucose available to the cells of the body. From the first bite of food, there is a burst of insulin secreted to control blood sugar rise. Then a steady stream of insulin is released to handle the continued digestion of the meal. Around the clock, a small amount of insulin keeps control over blood glucose. Insulins effect is to lower your blood glucose by transporting the glucose into the cells of the body to be burned for energy or stored as fat. Another hormone, called amylin, is released with the insulin and works in the intestinal tract to regulate glucose absorption. When this complex system of fuelin Continue reading >>

Fat For Fuel: Why Dietary Fat, Not Glucose, Is The Preferred Body Fuel

Fat For Fuel: Why Dietary Fat, Not Glucose, Is The Preferred Body Fuel

Contrary to popular belief, glucose is NOT the preferred fuel of human metabolism; the fact is that burning dietary fat for fuel may actually be the key to optimal health Carbohydrate intake is the primary factor that determines your body's fat ratio, and processed grains and sugars (particularly fructose) are the primary culprits behind our skyrocketing obesity and diabetes rates According to experts, carbs should make up only 20 percent of your diet, while 50-70 percent of your diet should be healthy fats. Fat is far more satiating than carbs, so if you have cut down on carbs and feel ravenous, this is a sign that you need more healthy fat to burn for fuel By Dr. Mercola While we may consider ourselves to be at the pinnacle of human development, our modern food manufacturing processes have utterly failed at improving health and increasing longevity. During the Paleolithic period, many thousands of years ago, our ancestors ate primarily vegetables, fruit, nuts, roots and meat—and a wide variety of it. This diet was high in fats and protein, and low in grain- and sugar-derived carbohydrates. The average person's diet today, on the other hand, is the complete opposite, and the average person's health is a testament of what happens when you adhere to a faulty diet. Humans today suffer more chronic and debilitating diseases than ever before. And there can be little doubt that our food choices play a major role in this development. Quite simply, you were not designed to eat large amounts of refined sugar, high fructose corn syrup, cereal, bread, potatoes and pasteurized milk products. As Mark Sisson states in the featured article:1 "If you want to live a better life and eat the best foods nature provided for health and fitness, then it's time to ditch the old paradigms an Continue reading >>

What Is Glucose (sugar In The Blood) And What Purpose Does It Serve?

What Is Glucose (sugar In The Blood) And What Purpose Does It Serve?

Question: What is glucose (sugar in the blood) and what purpose does it serve? Answer: Glucose, or commonly called sugar, is an important energy source that is needed by all the cells and organs of our bodies. Some examples are our muscles and our brain. Glucose or sugar comes from the food we eat. Carbohydrates such as fruit, bread pasta and cereals are common sources of glucose. These foods are broken down into sugar in our stomachs, and then absorbed into the bloodstream. Normal glucose levels are typically less than 100 milligrams per deciliter, in the morning, when you first wake up, or before eating. We call this the fasting blood glucose or the sugar level. Normal glucose levels 1 to 2 hours after eating are typically less than 140. Next: What Causes High Blood Sugar And What Harm Can It Do To My Body? Continue reading >>

What Is The Role Of Glucose In The Body?

What Is The Role Of Glucose In The Body?

Carbohydrates such as glucose are important parts of our diet. Glucose acts as an energy source, a fuel which powers cellular machinery. It also provides structural benefits to cells which produce special molecules called glycoproteins. Glucose Features Glucose is a six-carbon sugar molecule which is highly polar and easily dissolves in water. This hexose molecule can be found in L and D conformations, but our body only recognizes D-glucose. Energy Role Glucose is the main energy source for body cells. When cells take glucose from the bloodstream, the sugar molecule is broken down through the process of glycolysis, which converts the hexose into pyruvate. Pyruvate can be metabolized further in the citric acid cycle. Glycosylation Role According to Essentials of Glycobiology, glucose plays a structural role with its inclusion in carbohydrate additions to proteins. These carbohydrate groups play important roles involving enzyme functions and binding. Glucose Shortages Although most body cells can utilize fats for energy in a pinch, brain cells and red blood cells rely almost completely on glucose to fulfill their energy needs. Even short periods of glucose shortages can kill these types of cells. Normal Dietary Requirements Our bodies can adapt to a wide range of dietary carbohydrate intake, but Human Anatomy and Physiology states that the general recommendation is 125 to 175 grams per day. A majority of this amount should be complex carbohydrates (grains and vegetables) as opposed to simple sugars such as candy. Continue reading >>

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