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Why Do Blood Sugar Levels Fluctuate

Menopause And Blood Sugar Fluctuations

Menopause And Blood Sugar Fluctuations

The carbohydrates you eat provide your body with fuel in the form of glucose. Blood sugar refers to the amount of glucose in your body. A normal blood sugar is about 80 mg/dl after fasting or before a meal. However, typical blood sugar levels may fluctuate between 80 mg/dl and 120 mg/dl. Abnormal blood sugar fluctuations can occur for a number of reasons and leave you feeling tired, hungry, irritable and unable to concentrate. You may also feel dizzy or experience blurred vision. Poor eating habits and skipping meals can contribute to low blood sugar levels, or hypoglycemia. High blood sugar levels are generally linked to diabetes, a condition in which the pancreas produces too little insulin or fails to make insulin at all. Menopause can increase the incidence of blood sugar fluctuations. Your metabolism can shift and change dramatically during menopause. One study discovered that estrogen levels during menopause can increase fat storage and increases the risk of imbalanced blood sugars. As progesterone levels fall, women’s bodies are less able to use fat for energy and may experience higher insulin levels and abnormal blood sugar levels. If you are struggling with blood sugar fluctuations, you may reach for a menopause treatment to help ease the discomfort. You can also try making lifestyle changes. Carbohydrate cravings can be intense during a hypoglycemic episode, but before grabbing a candy bar or bag of chips, reach instead for healthier complex carbs. Whole grains, fresh vegetables and fiber-rich fruits can all be good choices. Try not to skip meals, and focus on getting regular exercise, which can help prevent weight gain. High blood sugars may indicate a visit to your health care practitioner is in order. Menopause natural relief can be used to even out the h Continue reading >>

Perplexing And Unexplained Blood Sugar Level Fluctuations

Perplexing And Unexplained Blood Sugar Level Fluctuations

Attaining normal glucose levels is like a pilgrimage for every person with diabetes. But like the stock market or a rollercoaster ride, blood sugar levels never remain the same and have an uncanny knack of fluctuating throughout the day. Fasting sugar levels are different from postprandial levels and added to that, people with diabetes tend to have unexplained blood sugar level fluctuations leading to unnecessary low sugar levels (hypoglycemia) and high sugar levels (hyperglycemia). For many diabetics, this is perplexing and disappointing.Despite all the efforts, their sugar levels never seem to stay put at a single level! Why do blood sugar levels fluctuate? It is a fact that even in non-diabetic people, blood sugar levels fluctuate throughout the day. Factors affecting the fluctuation of blood sugar levels include diet (what you eat, how much you eat,&time since last meal),your activity levels, stress, diseases, illness, infection, changing seasons, and a variety of reasons can cause fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Normal Blood Sugar Fluctuation Range In non-diabetic people, the fluctuations of blood sugar levels are narrow despite long hours of fasting or after feasting. This is because of their metabolic hemostasis that allows them to maintain balance and equilibrium. In experiments where a 24-hour continuous measurement of glucose concentration of healthy subjects was conducted, it was found that there were indeed fluctuations. The blood sugar levels were high after meals at around 118 after lunch and dinner, and after breakfast it was highest around 132.4. The values in the rest of the day and the nighttime were around 93 and 81.8. Unexplained Fluctuations in Blood Sugar Levels The most disturbing aspect a person with diabetes can have is unexplained fluctuati Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

If you have diabetes, pregnancy presents special challenges that most women never need to worry about. Pregnancy can cause such drastic fluctuations in blood sugar that even women who do not have diabetes can acquire it temporarily while they are pregnant, a condition known as gestational diabetes. If you already have diabetes, it is important to begin managing your condition as early as possible, ideally before you become pregnant. In this article we will discuss the management of diabetes and pregnancy. Your Pregnancy Diabetes Healthcare Team It is important to see an ob-gyn regularly during pregnancy, but if you have pre-gestational diabetes, your regular doctor may also want you to see an endocrinologist or a maternal fetal medicine specialist. Your doctor may also want you to see an eye specialist, as diabetes during pregnancy can cause damage to the small blood vessels in your eyes. It may also be helpful for you to see a registered dietician. Risks of Pregnancy Diabetes If your blood glucose levels get too high while you are pregnant, you are likely to experience a worsening of existing long-term problems related to your diabetes, such as heart and kidney disease, foot problems, and eye problems. You and your baby will also be at increased risk for: Macrosomia—this is when a baby is unusually large (over nine pounds) at birth. Risk for this condition rises with diabetes and pregnancy. If you have poor control over your blood sugar, the excess glucose can cause your baby’s pancreas to manufacture an excess of insulin, which can cause him or her to grow too large while still in the womb. This can cause problems during childbirth, and may lead to a C-section delivery. Breathing difficulties for the newborn Infant hypoglycemia, a condition that results in chronic Continue reading >>

How Much Should Sugars Fluctuate Before & After Meals?

How Much Should Sugars Fluctuate Before & After Meals?

Everyone’s blood sugar, or blood glucose levels, will fluctuate throughout the day. The main factors that affect blood sugar include what and how much you eat and how long it’s been since your last meal. Activity level, stress, infection or illness can also affect glucose levels. Generally, your blood sugar is lowest when you’ve fasted overnight, or for at least eight hours, and highest within an hour or two after eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Blood glucose can be measured by a blood test in a lab or from a finger stick and a glucose meter. A normal blood glucose reading after fasting overnight is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter. Most healthy people's blood sugar will be within this range for most of the day and night because the body’s hormones insulin and glucagon work to keep glucose from going too high or low. On the High End If your blood glucose is checked after you’ve eaten, it may be higher, but how high depends on what you ate and how long it’s been since you ate. Foods that are rich in carbohydrates, like breads, pasta, potatoes, sugary drinks or desserts, will raise blood sugar the highest. Blood sugar goes up for an hour or two after you eat, and then it starts to return to normal. Even after meals, a healthy person’s blood sugar is usually less than 140 mg/dl. If It’s Too High Blood glucose levels that are too high may mean you have prediabetes or diabetes. Prediabetes, also know as impaired fasting glucose, is diagnosed when your fasting blood glucose is higher than the normal range and between 100 and 125 mg/dl. This increases the risk of diabetes. A diagnosis of diabetes is made if fasting blood glucose is over 126 mg/dl or you have two random glucose measurements over 200 mg/dl. Occasionally, medical problems o Continue reading >>

Top Reasons Why Blood Sugar Levels Fluctuate In Our Body

Top Reasons Why Blood Sugar Levels Fluctuate In Our Body

As a diabetic, you know that you need to keep your blood sugar levels balanced throughout the day. You have been taking care of what you eat; you have been walking and being physically active and not missing a dose of your medication. Yes! That should take care of the blood sugar levels. Few random checks may reveal something altogether unexpected. Your blood sugar levels have been doing crazy stuff while you were assured that it is under control. Perplexed? Well, there is a surprise in store for you. Other than the known facts, that can play havoc with your blood sugar levels; there are loads of other things that can play spoilsport for you sugar levels. Here are the 20 reasons that might be the culprit for the ever changing blood sugar levels. Read on to know more: Infection: Flu, cough, cold and other infections can increase the blood sugar levels in your body by at least 75 mg/dl. A high blood sugar level means more vulnerability to chronic infections. Tea, coffee, energy drinks and sugar levels: Caffeine is found to increase the blood sugar levels, even if your tea and coffee is without milk and sugar. Energy, soft, sports drinks are not good for your blood sugar level. Getting dehydrated: In case you are sweating too much or suffering from diarrhoea, you might have high sugar levels in the blood. This is because the body does not have adequate fluid to dilute the sugars. Periods and menopause: The hormonal changes that are responsible for periods and menopause can affect your blood sugar levels as well. It will depend on individuals on how their body reacts to blood sugar levels with hormonal changes. Travelling in different time zones: Your body’s biological clock goes all upside down when you travel to different time zones. This affects the blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Tweet Knowing and understanding the symptoms of high and low blood sugar should be essential for both diabetics and their friends and families. Symptoms of high blood sugar Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, is common amongst diabetics. It occurs when a diabetic person eats too much food, and has too little insulin to regulate their blood sugar. Sometimes stress can cause diabetes. Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Need for frequent urination Drowsiness Nausea Extreme hunger and/or thirst Blurring of the vision Symptoms of low blood sugar Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when a diabetic has not eaten enough food, or has too much insulin within his or her body. An excessive amount of exercise can also cause low blood sugar levels. Be aware of low blood sugar symptoms Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Shaking Fast heartbeat Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Extreme hunger Weakness and tiredness Irritability Why do these symptoms matter for diabetics? These symptoms are essential for diabetics to understand, because they may encounter high or low blood sugar levels from time to time. A cold or virus can cause sudden high blood sugar levels, and understand the symptoms means knowing how to deal with hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. People with diabetes who can recognise the symptoms can avoid levels that lead to medical emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Knowing your high and low blood sugar symptoms allows you to test Once you understand symptoms of high and low blood sugar, it is possible to test quickly and avoid serious proble Continue reading >>

5 Causes Of Blood Sugar Fluctuations In Diabetes

5 Causes Of Blood Sugar Fluctuations In Diabetes

Blood sugar levels fluctuate all the time and for many different reasons. If living with diabetes, these fluctuations can be problematic, debilitating, and even dangerous for some. By better understanding the factors that trigger these events, you can avoid many of the ill effects of the disease and better manage your condition over the long term. Here are five of the most common causes of blood sugar fluctuations and things you can do to better control them: 1. Food and Drink When you eat, your blood sugar will rise as the foods you consume are metabolized and enter the bloodstream. The types of food you eat, therefore, are key to controlling your disease. Simple carbohydrates and high-sugar foods, for example, cause bigger spikes in blood glucose than either protein, fats, and complex carbs. Understanding this can help you direct your eating habits. To avoid fluctuations, focus on foods that are lower on the glycemic index. This is the index that rates carbohydrates by how much they affect blood sugar. Carbs like candy, cake, and cookies have a high glycemic index, while whole-grain bread, yams, and oatmeal have a low glycemic index. Fiber is also an important part of a diabetic diet. Although fiber is a carbohydrate, it doesn't raise blood sugar like other carbs. In fact, high fiber intake is associated with decreased glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes. 2. Alcohol Intake What you drink matters just much as what you eat. This is especially true when it comes to alcohol. Alcoholic beverages of any type are known to increase insulin production which, in turn, causes an associated drop in blood sugar. On the flip side, certain alcoholic drinks can raise blood sugar due the carbohydrates contained in them. Beer has highest count overall with 13 grams of carbohy Continue reading >>

Factors That Affect Blood Glucose

Factors That Affect Blood Glucose

Many of us may often try to predict what our blood glucose levels may be, but as some of you may have learned, diabetes can be unpredictable and your blood glucose sometimes has a mind of its own. Regardless if you ate the same thing as you did the day prior and followed your same routine, it is often normal to have fluctuations with your blood glucose levels. As frustrating as it might be, sometimes there is no rhyme or reason to understand why your blood glucose levels are what they are. Although you have the ability to control what you eat and the amount, your level of physical activity and taking your medications consistently and correctly there are many other factors that may contribute to both high and low blood glucose levels. If we have a better understanding of what is causing blood glucose levels to fluctuate we have a better job of controlling it, right? Below are some factors that may contribute to some of your blood glucose fluctuations throughout the day. Potential causes of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) What we eat and drink The amount of carbohydrates with meals, snacks and beverages Not being physically active (or being less active than normal) Diabetes medications Not getting enough insulin or oral medications Missing medications Not taking diabetes medications correctly Not injecting insulin correctly Stress (this may include both physical or mental stress) Illness/infection (colds, flu etc.) Injury/Pain or surgery Menstrual periods or menopause (changes in hormones) Various medications such as; steroids or psych meds Sleep (not getting enough sleep) Diet Diabetes Medications Taking insulin or diabetes medication without eating any carbohydrates Too much insulin or other diabetes medications that may cause hypoglycemia (if you regularly experience Continue reading >>

What Is Brittle Diabetes?

What Is Brittle Diabetes?

Brittle diabetes is a severe form of diabetes. Also called labile diabetes, this condition causes unpredictable swings in blood sugar (glucose) levels. These swings can affect your quality of life and even lead to hospitalization. Thanks to advances in diabetes management, this condition is uncommon. However, it can still occur in people with diabetes. In some cases, it’s a sign that your blood sugar is poorly managed. The best way to prevent brittle diabetes is to follow a diabetes care plan created by your doctor. The biggest risk factor for brittle diabetes is having type 1 diabetes. Brittle diabetes occurs mainly in people with type 1 diabetes, and rarely in people with type 2 diabetes. Some doctors classify it as a complication of diabetes, while others consider it a subtype of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). However, your body may have a reaction to insulin, also causing dips in glucose levels. This results in a dangerous “roller coaster” effect. The fluctuation in glucose levels can be rapid and unpredictable, causing dramatic symptoms. In addition to having type 1 diabetes, your risk of brittle diabetes is higher if you: are female have hormonal imbalances are overweight have hypothyroidism (low thyroid) are in your 20s or 30s have a high level of stress on a regular basis have depression Frequent symptoms of low or high blood glucose levels are common indicators of brittle diabetes. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes can experience these symptoms when their blood sugar levels are off. However, with brittle diabetes, these symptoms occur and change frequently and without warning. Symptoms of very low blood sugar levels include: dizziness weakness irritability extreme hunger trembling hands do Continue reading >>

What Should I Know About High Fasting Blood Glucose Levels With Diabetes?

What Should I Know About High Fasting Blood Glucose Levels With Diabetes?

In general the goal for all of us, including those with diabetes is to try keep our fasting blood sugar stable at 100 or below. 1.) The A1C test which reflects your average blood sugar levels over the last 3 months. Usually, fasting blood glucose levels of: Hemaglobin A1C or A1C numbers that your health provider can measure are usually as follows: One specific pattern of glucose fluctuations needs special consideration: high fasting blood glucose values. It seems perfectly logical for blood sugar levels to rise after eating, but many people are surprised to find that they have higher glucose levels when they get up than they do before other meals of the day, such as dinner. Higher blood sugar levels in the morning mean that you have less insulin action in your body overnight. We often see this in people treated with medications such as the sulfonylureas, which are more effective at promoting insulin release following eating than during prolonged fasting. In addition, there are two special conditions that may raise fasting glucose levels. The first is called the dawn phenomenon, which results from an increase in certain hormones in the body, especially the stress hormone cortisol, beginning at three or four o'clock in the morning. Cortisol increases insulin resistance, often causing a rise in blood sugar values. The other problem is called the Somogyi effect. This refers to a blood sugar level that rises in the early morning after the person experiences an unrecognized hypoglycemic event during the night. High morning glucose values should prompt some testing at bedtime and then a few tests at 2 or 3 A.M., just to rule out nocturnal hypoglycemia. Clues to nighttime hypoglycemia include fitful sleep, nightmares, or awakening drenched in sweat. The Best Life Guide to Manag Continue reading >>

Glucose Levels Can Fluctuate For Variety Of Reasons

Glucose Levels Can Fluctuate For Variety Of Reasons

Living with diabetes blog Unexplained elevations in your blood glucose values can be perplexing. Most of you understand that increased carbohydrate intake or decreased physical activity raises your blood glucose, but what if you're seeing glucose elevations despite maintaining a relatively consistent diet and exercise schedule? Hormonal fluctuations brought on by illness, injury, surgery, emotional stress, puberty, menses and menopause can also affect blood glucose. Physical or emotional stress triggers the release of hormones called catecholamines, which often cause hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Even if you don't have diabetes, you can develop hyperglycemia during severe illness. If you already have diabetes, you may need more insulin or other diabetes medications during illness or stress. For children, insulin requirements increase with growth, particularly during puberty. This can, in part, be attributed to growth hormone as well as the sex hormones, estrogen and testosterone. For girls and women, menstruation and menopause present unique challenges to blood glucose control. Estrogen and progesterone can induce temporary resistance to insulin, which can last up to a few days and then drop off. Many women report having higher blood glucose levels a few days before beginning their period. Once menstruation begins, some women continue to have hyperglycemia while others experience a sharp drop in glucose levels. During menopause, women often notice their blood glucose levels are more variable or less predictable than before. Significant hyperglycemia can lead to emergency complications such as diabetic ketoacidosis or diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome. Persistent hyperglycemia puts you at increased risk for long-term complications such as cardiovascular disease, blindne Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Throughout The Day - For Normal People And Those With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Throughout The Day - For Normal People And Those With Diabetes

Most of us have heard the term blood sugar bandied around enough that we think we know what it means, but few of us really understand the complexity of the system that makes a steady supply of fuel available to our cells around the clock. The basic facts are these: All animals have a small amount of a simple sugar called glucose floating around in their bloodstream all the time. This simple sugar is one of two fuels that the cells of the body can burn for fuel. The other is fat. Though you may occasionally eat pure glucose--it's called "dextrose" when it is found in the list of ingredients on a U.S. food label--most of the glucose in your blood doesn't come from eating glucose. It is produced when your digestive system breaks down the larger molecules of complex sugars and starch. Sugars like those found in table sugar, corn syrup, milk and fruit and the starches found in flour, potatoes, rice, and beans all contain chains of glucose that are bonded together with other substances. During digestion, enzymes break these bonds and liberate the glucose molecules which are then absorbed into your bloodstream. How Blood Sugar is Measured Blood sugar concentrations are described using a number that describes the weight of glucose that is found in a specific volume of blood. In the U.S. that measurement is milligrams per deciliter, which is abbreviated as "mg/dl." Europeans and almost all researchers publishing in medical journals use a different measurement, micromoles per liter, abbreviated "mmol/L." You can convert any European measurements you encounter to the American standard by multiplying the mmol/L number by 18. There's a handy converter online that will do this for you automatically. You'll find it at If a blood test says that your blood sugar is 85 mg/dl this means t Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

A healthy dog has a blood glucose level ranging from 75 mg to 120 mg. A dog is diagnosed with high blood sugar, or as hyperglycemic, when it exhibits high blood glucose, or sugar above the normal range. Elevated blood sugar may be temporary, stress-induced, or a sign of a serious underlying disease such as pancreatitis or diabetes mellitus. High blood sugar is more common in female than male dogs, and is more likely to occur in older dogs. Elevated blood glucose can occur transiently fairly often for various reasons (diet, stress, exertion, medications). Moderately elevated glucose can indicate infections (dental, kidneys, bladder), inflammatory conditions (pancreatitis) and hormonal imbalances (Hyperadrenocorticism). However persistent high glucose levels in the blood is diagnostic of Diabetes Mellitus. High blood Sugar causes increased thirst and urination. See a veterinarian promptly if your dogs shows these symptoms. The warning signs for high blood sugar are varied. If your dog’s high blood sugar is temporary or the result of stress or medication, you may not see any symptoms. However, if it is the result of a serious disease, you will likely see some of the following: Wounds not healing; infections worsening Depression Enlarged liver Urinary tract or kidney infection Bloodshot eyes Cataracts Extreme fluctuation in weight, gaining or losing Obesity Hyperactivity Excessive thirst or hunger Increased frequency of urination High blood sugar can indicate one of the following issues: Diabetes mellitus, caused by a loss of pancreatic beta cells, which leads to decreased production of insulin, rending the dog unable to process sugar sufficiently. Pancreatitis, inflammation of the pancreas, which can damage insulin-producing cells, inhibiting the dog’s ability to proce Continue reading >>

What’s The Deal On Fluctuating Blood Sugars?

What’s The Deal On Fluctuating Blood Sugars?

What’s the Deal on Fluctuating Blood Sugars? One of the most persistent problems that my patients tell me about when they come in for their first visit is a lack of energy, sometimes followed by explosive bursts of temper, foggy thinking, and other unpleasant effects from eating a diet high in sugars and carbohydrates. Now, these people didn’t come to me to correct their low energy, or quick temper, and often they don’t even know there is a connection between the way they feel and what they eat. But the connection is clear. These patients are on a daily fun-house ride that seems painfully slow at times, then explosively fast at others. In medicine, we know this to be the result of fluctuating blood sugars. You eat pancakes for breakfast, with syrup, you feel like a million until about 10 am when all of a sudden you find yourself sweaty, cranky, irritable and sometimes even faint. So what do you do? Grab a donut and a cup of coffee? I hope not, but that’s often the answer. Then the fun house starts all over again, ultimately plunging you into a dark, scary place which feels like you’ll never get out. What most of these patients came to see me about is overweight and obesity. Many of them have tried punishing diets with almost no protein or fat, often vegetarian, and with such low calories that their body is thrown into a tantrum of fluctuating blood sugars. The Dangers of Blood Sugar Fluctuation A low level of blood sugar, referred to as hypoglycemia, results in an inadequate supply of glucose to the brain and leads to a considerable amount of malfunction. Hypoglycemia can cause a number unpleasant symptoms including fatigue, weakness, dizziness, inability to concentrate, poor memory, anxiety, depression, irritability, heart palpitations and excessive sweating. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Swings

Blood Sugar Swings

Patients frequently want to know “what causes my blood sugars to go up and down even though I am doing the same things every day.” Patients will eat similar foods in the same quantities daily and hope their blood sugars will stay at the same level. Although eating does have a huge impact on blood sugars, there are other causes as well. Let’s look at some of the other possible reasons why your blood sugars may vary from day to day. Illness or Physical Stress Having a urinary tract, lung, or skin infection, as well as the flu or gum disease can make your blood sugars fluctuate. Often patients do not realize there is an underlying infection until their blood sugars soar. If you see your blood glucose numbers climbing for no apparent reason you should take your temperature and check with your physician to rule out possible infection. Chronic unrelieved pain or fibromyalgia may also cause blood sugar changes. Find ways to resolve these issues by researching physical therapy, chiropractic medicine, acupuncture, yoga, pain relievers or any other alternative ways to achieve pain relief. Lack of sleep or poor quality of sleep can result in chronic stress and insulin resistance, which will raise blood sugars. Medication Medications can have an effect on blood sugar variations from day to day. Patients who skip their daily diabetes medicines will have blood sugar fluctuations. Starting new medications can cause changes. Remember, it may take new medications between 4-8 weeks to show improved and consistent blood sugar control. Existing medicine dosages that are increased or decreased will have an impact on sugars. Certain patients do not take medications as prescribed. For example Glipizide (an oral sulfonylurea) needs to be taken 30 minutes prior to a meal. This gives it ti Continue reading >>

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