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Why Are Blood Sugars High

Why Do We Want To Eat More Sweets When Our Blood Sugar Is High (like 180)?

Why Do We Want To Eat More Sweets When Our Blood Sugar Is High (like 180)?

I’ve never known a diabetic who went into a coma with blood sugars of 370, but that is high enough that you’ll be getting disturbances of electrolytes that affect how your brain works. Lots of diabetics get a little manic when their sugars are over 300 or so. Coma is more of an 600 to 1200 thing. People have misconceptions about the effects of low sugars, too. I’ve also known a diabetic who had a sugar of 12 and could drive—well enough to stop her car when she was pursued by the police, get out, and slug the cop. (She didn’t have to go jail.) I have been functional enough to walk through a large building to get a Coke (glucose is better, by the way, but I had forgotten mine) when my sugars were 22 (remembered the glucometer, forgot the glucose). Why do you want more sweets when your blood sugars are high? Two things are going on. When your blood sugar levels go up, cells protect themselves from getting flooded with sugar by switching off insulin receptors. They become “resistant.” However, at the same time they aren’t getting the sugars they ordinarily need. Your pancreas tries to lower your sugars by releasing even more insulin (if you’re type 2), so your cells become even more insulin resistant, and even more fuel-deprived….you get the idea. You’re trying to force sugar into your system by craving sweets, not consciously, of course, but the more you eat the more you crave. This is why diabetes is so hard to manage. Continue reading >>

Why My Blood Sugar Level Are Comparatively High In Winters Than Is Summers?

Why My Blood Sugar Level Are Comparatively High In Winters Than Is Summers?

There are few studies indicating that the increased physical activity in summer require adjustments in insulin doses, less insulin than that used during the winter season where presumably physical activity is decreased. One such study performed in Swedish children showed that : “ Lower HbA1c was seen in spring and summer, and higher in autumn and winter (p=0.023). Patients reporting severe hypoglycaemia had a seasonal variation in HbA1c (p=0.019) and a tendency to seasonal variation in insulin dose, while patients not reporting severe hypoglycaemia did not vary in HbA1c or insulin dose”. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2000 May;13(5):529-35. Seasonal variation of HbA1c in intensive treatment of children with type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Why Am I Constantly Shaking (low Blood Sugar) After Eating A Diet High In Healthy Fats?

Why Am I Constantly Shaking (low Blood Sugar) After Eating A Diet High In Healthy Fats?

Fats are not immediately processed into sugar but into triglycerides which enter the blood stream via the thoracic duct (According to Kendrick). If you are suffering hypos then eat more carbs. No need to overdo it. If you start shaking due to a hypo it is not usually trembling but more like rowing a boat, it can get pretty noticeable. The only way to be sure it is a hypo is with a meter. Continue reading >>

Why Do Some People Believe That Having High Blood Sugar Is Dangerous?

Why Do Some People Believe That Having High Blood Sugar Is Dangerous?

Exposing body organs to high blood sugar causes three pathys - Neuropathy, Retinopathy and Nephropathy. They are damage to or loss of arms & legs, eyes and kidney respectively. Lord ThiruPathy VenkatachalaPathy (name of a Hindu God) cannot even help the three pathys caused by high blood sugar. High blood sugar should be considered as dangerous to organs and a serious problem. Intermittent Fasting, exercise, weight loss and diet are effective ways to control blood sugar, in addition to prescribed oral medicine and Insulin injection. Because it is. High blood sugar triggers high insulin levels and both under mine the functions of nearly every system in the body. Diabetic eyes, loss of feeling in the legs, inflammation in the brain, obesity, the threat of amputations. High blood sugar creates a stress response and throws the whole endocrine system off. Can result in thyroid dysfunction. Early death from complications. Continue reading >>

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

If you get a high reading when checking your blood sugar, is there a way to get the number down quickly? Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

Common Questions About Blood Sugar

How often should I test my blood sugar? This is a very common question, and the answer isn't the same for everyone. In general, you should test as often as you need to get helpful information. There's no point in testing if the information you get doesn't help you manage your diabetes. If you've been told to test at certain times, but you don't know why or what to do with the test results, then testing won't seem very meaningful. Here are some general guidelines for deciding how often to test: If you can only test once a day, then do it before breakfast. Keep a written record so that you can see the pattern of the numbers. If you control your blood sugar by diet and exercise only, this once-a-day test might be enough. If you take medicine (diabetes pills or insulin), you will probably want to know how well that medicine is working. The general rule is to test before meals and keep a record. If you want to know how your meals affect your blood sugar, testing about 2 hours after eating can be helpful. Test whenever you feel your blood sugar is either too high or too low. Testing will give you important information about what you need to do to raise or lower your blood sugar. If you take more than 2 insulin shots a day or use an insulin pump, you should test 4 to 6 times a day. You should test more often if you're having unusually high or low readings, if you're sick, under more stress than usual, or are pregnant. If you change your schedule or travel, you should also test your blood sugar more often than usual. Talk to a member of your health care team about how often to test based on your personal care plan. What should my test numbers be? There isn't one blood sugar target that's right for everyone with diabetes. It's important to work with your health care team to set Continue reading >>

Why Doesn't A Low Blood Sugar Level Have The Same Effect As A High Blood Sugar Level?

Why Doesn't A Low Blood Sugar Level Have The Same Effect As A High Blood Sugar Level?

Because brain needs glucose! If there’s low blood sugar condition, means low glucose in the blood, brain not getting enough, it can shut down, induce coma. But before that, body gives warning, like sweating, shaking, muscle weakness etc… High BG 2x - 3x of normal, cause tiredness, sluggishness, thinking slows down , confusion etc… If BG goes very high, like 800–900 it can cause coma too, person’s passing out. Brain holds 1 liter of blood all the time. Normal BG is between 80–120. You are 1/2 right. Low blood sugar is actually caused by the blood cells absorbing to much sugar. Also, imagine that you are really thirsty. Then imagine drinking way, way to much water. On the one hand, being thirsty causes dehydration, and can lead to headaches, nausea, weakness, and other problems. On the other hand, drinking too much can lead to a lower salt concentration in your blood, and can cause vomiting, cramps, seizures (in extreme cases), and other problems. One is caused by having to much, and the other is caused by having to little. The symptoms they both generate are both different, because they are different conditions. Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes—when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin. You get glucose from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports the glucose to the cells via the bloodstream. Body Needs Insulin However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes may have enough insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're insulin resistant. Some people with type 2 diabetes may not produce enough insulin. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control (by using insulin, medications, and appropriate meal planning). For example, if someone with type 1 diabetes doesn't take enough insulin before eating, the glucose their body makes from that food can build up in their blood and lead to hyperglycemia. Your endocrinologist will tell you what your target blood glucose levels are. Your levels may be different from what is usually considered as normal because of age, pregnancy, and/or other factors. Fasting hyperglycemia is defined as when you don't eat for at least eight hours. Recommended range without diabet Continue reading >>

8 Signs You Might Have High Blood Sugar

8 Signs You Might Have High Blood Sugar

You’ve heard people complain about having low blood sugar before and may have even experienced it yourself. But high blood sugar is also an issue that can a) make you feel like crap and b) cause serious health issues if it happens too often. First, a primer: High blood sugar occurs when the level of glucose (i.e. sugar) in your blood becomes elevated. We get our glucose from food, and most foods we eat impact our blood sugar in one way or another, certified dietitian-nutritionist Lisa Moskovitz, R.D., CEO of NY Nutrition Group, tells SELF. “However, foods that are higher in carbohydrates and sugar, yet lower in fat and fiber, such as baked goods, white-flour breads, soda, and candy usually have a bigger impact on blood sugar levels,” she says. In the short-term, they cause sudden rises in blood sugar (i.e. high blood sugar), which can immediately give you a jolt of energy but will inevitably be followed up by a crash. These foods are also usually not great for you, Moskovitz points out, and can cause excess weight gain, high cholesterol, and bodily inflammation. Having high blood sugar here and there happens, and it will basically just make you feel off. You’ll feel worn-out, headachy, all-around tired, cranky, and may have difficulty concentrating, Jessica Cording, a New York-based R.D., tells SELF. But the major problem lies in having chronically high blood sugar, which can lead to type 2 diabetes, a condition in which your body can’t properly regulate blood sugar. If you get chronic high blood sugar, you’ll also often experience the need to pee frequently, increased thirst, and even have blurred vision, Alissa Rumsey, M.S., R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells SELF. But if you’re not suffering from chronic high blood su Continue reading >>

5 Reasons Your Blood Sugar Is High

5 Reasons Your Blood Sugar Is High

It’s easy to feel overwhelmed when it comes to trying to understand what’s causing your high blood sugars. In life with diabetes, it’s only natural that we experience high blood sugars now and then, but when those highs seem to be a total mystery or not the result of blatant carb-counting snafus, they could be the result of something in your diabetes management that needs some tweaking. Here are 5 common reasons for consistently high blood sugars: Not enough background/basal insulin or oral meds: Whether you’re on a pump, pens or syringes, the number of units you’ve been taking for your background or basal insulin dose can change very easily throughout your life, sometimes without any clear reason. Usually, though, we go through phases of life that impact our background insulin needs such as increased regular stress, decreased activity, weight-gain, consuming more calories/carbohydrates or not getting enough sleep. All of the above are variables that could easily lead your body to needing just a wee bit more insulin in the background or a higher dose of your oral diabetes medications. If your blood sugar seems to be rising even several hours after you’ve eaten or while you’re sleeping, that’s a good sign your meal-time doses need some tweaking with the hep of your diabetes healthcare team! Not enough meal-time insulin: Your meal-time insulin doses can change just as easily as your background insulin doses because of gaining weight, less exercise, more regular stress, more food, etc. If your blood sugar is rising after every meal, and you’re constantly taking correction doses on top of your meal doses, that’s a good sign your meal-time doses need some tweaking with the help of your diabetes healthcare team! (By the way, that means your correction dose Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar - Self-care

High Blood Sugar - Self-care

High blood sugar is also called high blood glucose, or hyperglycemia. High blood sugar almost always happens in people who have diabetes. High blood sugar occurs when: Your body makes too little insulin. Your body does not respond to the signal insulin is sending. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body move glucose (sugar) from the blood into muscle or fat, where it is stored for later use when energy is needed. Sometimes high blood sugar occurs due to stress from surgery, infection, trauma, or medicines. After the stress is over, blood sugar returns to normal. Symptoms of high blood sugar can include: Being very thirsty or having a dry mouth Having blurry vision Having dry skin Feeling weak or tired Needing to urinate a lot, or needing to get up more often than usual at night to urinate You may have other, more serious symptoms if your blood sugar becomes very high or remains high for a long time. High blood sugar can harm you. If your blood sugar is high, you need to know how to bring it down. If you have diabetes, here are some questions to ask yourself when your blood sugar is high: Are you eating right? Are you eating too much? Have you been following your diabetes meal plan? Did you have a meal or a snack with a lot of carbohydrates, starches, or simple sugars? Are you taking your diabetes medicines correctly? Has your doctor changed your medicines? If you take insulin, have you been taking the correct dose? Is the insulin expired? Or has it been stored in a hot or cold place? Are you afraid of having low blood sugar? Is that causing you to eat too much or take too little insulin or other diabetes medicine? Have you injected insulin into a scar or overused area? Have you been rotating sites? What else has changed? Have you been less active than usual? Do you hav Continue reading >>

High Blood Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

High Blood Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

What is high blood glucose? People who do not have diabetes typically have fasting plasma blood glucose levels that run under 100 mg/dl. Your physician will define for you what your target blood glucose should be — identifying a blood glucose target that is as close to normal as possible that you can safely achieve given your overall medical health. In general, high blood glucose, also called 'hyperglycemia', is considered "high" when it is 160 mg/dl or above your individual blood glucose target. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider what he or she thinks is a safe target for you for blood glucose before and after meals. If your blood glucose runs high for long periods of time, this can pose significant problems for you long-term — increased risk of complications, such as eye disease, kidney disease, heart attacks and strokes and more. High blood glucose can pose health problems in the short-term as well. Your treatment plan may need adjustment if the blood glucose stays over 180 mg/dl for 3 days in a row. It is important to aim to keep your blood glucose under control, and treat hyperglycemia when it occurs. What are the symptoms of high blood glucose? Increased thirst Increased urination Dry mouth or skin Tiredness or fatigue Blurred vision More frequent infections Slow healing cuts and sores Unexplained weight loss What causes high blood glucose? Too much food Too little exercise or physical activity Skipped or not enough diabetes pills or insulin Insulin that has spoiled after being exposed to extreme heat or freezing cold Stress, illness, infection, injury or surgery A blood glucose meter that is not reading accurately What should you do for high blood glucose? Be sure to drink plenty of water. It is recommended to drink a minimum of 8 glasses each day. If yo Continue reading >>

What Causes High Blood Sugar And What Harm Can It Do To My Body?

What Causes High Blood Sugar And What Harm Can It Do To My Body?

Question: What causes high blood sugar and what harm can it do to my body? Answer: Diabetes is a condition where the glucose or sugar levels are too high in the blood. Now, there are many reasons why the blood sugar levels get too high in people with diabetes, but I will only mention the two main defects now. The first is that the pancreas which is an important endocrine organ in our bodies does not secrete enough insulin. Insulin is the hormone that helps glucose go from the bloodstream into the cells of our body to be used for energy. A complicated condition called insulin-resistance is the second main cause of diabetes. Insulin-resistance, which occurs primarily in type 2 diabetes, is when the cells of our body are resistant to the glucose-lowering effects of insulin. If an individual has either not enough insulin and/or insulin-resistance, then high blood sugar levels or diabetes will be present. High blood sugar levels if untreated will cause short-term effects and long-term complications. High blood sugar levels over the short term do not cause any damage to the organs of your body, however they will cause you to feel tired and weak, be thirsty, and urinate a lot, be susceptible to infections and have blurry vision. In fact in the elderly, high blood sugar levels can lead to dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and lead to falls and of course we know getting a broken hip as an elderly individual can be pretty devastating. Now high blood sugar levels over the long term, lets just say years, that can lead to the classic chronic complications of diabetes, eye disease or what we call retinopathy that leads to blindness, kidney disease or nephropathy leading to kidney failure necessitating either dialysis or transplantation, and nerve disease or neuropathy which commonl Continue reading >>

Why My Early Blood Sugar Level Is High &normal Blood Sugar Level In Evening?

Why My Early Blood Sugar Level Is High &normal Blood Sugar Level In Evening?

Insulin acts by activating a molecule that allows the transport of glucose molecules from your blood into your cells. This gives your cells glucose for energy and lowers your blood sugar. In insulin treated diabetes you have a (relative) insulin deficiency; your body does not produce enough insulin to allow enough glucose to enter the cells and you need to take exogenous insulin to allow the entry of sugar molecules into your cells. If your cells don’t have enough glucose (either due to lack of intake or due to the glucose not being able enter the cells) your body releases hormones such as glucagon, which release glucose from your energy stores. This increases your blood sugars. Now to explain why your sugars are normal in the evening and high in the morning there are number of things that can be happening. If you measure your sugars immediately after the evening meal you may have not yet absorbed enough carbs from the meal to raise your sugars significantly. Over the night the meal is absorbed increasing the blood sugar. Because you do not have enough insulin in your system this glucose is stuck in your blood stream and unable to enter the cells. Because your cells may not have enough glucose your body may release hormones like glucagon, which help to utilize your energy stores, again, increasing your blood glucose levels. If this is a frequent pattern you may want to see your diabetic nurse to discuss options. Slight increase insulin (moderate-long acting) may be suggested to ensure adequate insulin coverage over night. But remember the night time hypos are far more dangerous than morning highs. (I am not your doctor and this is not medical advice. If you are concerned about your health you should make an appointment with your health care provider.) Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

High Blood Sugar After Exercise?

back to Overview Markus, one of our great German-language authors, wrote about struggling with high blood sugar after exercise. I know it's a common problem, and one I've struggled with personally, so I want to make sure you get to see it, too. From Markus Berndt: It’s one of the first recommendations you get after being diagnosed with diabetes. “Get active, do more exercise, it’s good for you!” And since we’ve been a child we’ve heard that exercise is healthy. If we do it consistently we’re rewarded, literally, with an awesome beach body. Adding exercise into our day is also good for our diabetes. We’re taught that exercise lowers blood sugar, right? But can the opposite also be true? Can you have high blood sugar after exercise? Up close We now know that physical activity usually lowers blood sugar because it reduces how much insulin is needed to move sugar into the cells. While, in the past, most experts advised frequent training intervals at moderate intensity, but recent studies have shown that even short, intense workouts are very effective. For example, a 15-minute intense weight training lowered blood sugar even more than what’s seen in some endurance training. So activity lowers blood sugar – but not always! Personally, I experienced this very early on and was extremely irritated! I just learned that exercise lowers blood sugar, but an intense 45-minute run consistently resulted in higher blood sugars than when I started! What in the world? At first, I was confused and felt like I didn’t understand the world anymore. Then it was more of a “would you look at this?” kind of thing. And finally, I was determined to figure out what was happening. I knew there had to be an explanation. Why does exercise sometimes raise blood sugar? Exercise Continue reading >>

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