diabetestalk.net

Why Are Blood Sugar Levels Important

Share on facebook

Why Is It Important To Keep Your Blood Sugar Stable?

A few weeks ago, I explained the difference between glycemic index and glycemic load in this post. I also put together the very popular free Low Glycemic Cooking 101 page to make it easier for my readers to navigate low glycemic recipes available on my blog. In today’s post, I am addressing the next question: why should you care about your blood sugar levels even if you are not diabetic? Why is it important to keep your blood sugar stable? The answer is simple: high blood sugar can damage the lining of our blood vessels; persistently high blood sugar levels can also cause a number of degenerative diseases; low blood sugar levels trigger the release of the stress hormone cortisol. For these reasons, our brain is programmed to keep our blood sugar within a narrow range. As soon as the blood sugar goes over the normal level our brain declares an “emergency” and the hormone insulin goes to work to remove the excess blood sugar from the blood. At first, insulin takes the sugar to the muscles and the liver where it is stored as glycogen. Unfortunately, the storage capacity of our muscles and liver is limited, so as soon as they are full insulin starts transporting the excess sugar Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Awesome123

    My blood sugar which is usually in the low 100s spiked to 180 after walking on a treadmill for an hour. What makes blood sugar spike after exercise? Any ideas how to prevent it?

  2. hangry

    It is usually thought that one should check ones BG before Exercise to make sure it does not go to low. What happened to you is probably a liver dump. Besides getting a higher blood sugar right after we ate, our liver will convert fat to sugar when it thinks our body needs it. This is called 'liver dump," and plays a part in the Dawning blood sugar that we so often test when we get up. As we sleep at night, our liver will convert fat to sugar. A normal person will gobble up the sugar, and leave a "normal blood glucose' reading in the morning. A diabetic, as they can NOT correctly utilize the sugar, will find their BG is higher in the morning.
    Another person's story is instructive: When I had a stent a very nice lady came around every fifteen minutes to get my pulse, O2, BP. She told me about what happend to her one day on the job. She had taken her insulin and was working. She hit the floor. She said if she was any place else in the world, she would have died. She immediately had several high priced Cardiologists around her. I think she said her pulse was over 200 and her BG was over 400. She had a "Liver Dump" going on, and it was not slowing down. She had not eaten anything in a number of hours.
    It might be wise to eat something before you start exercising. This is to set the conditions so the Liver is less likely to over do the release of sugar. How much of what is a good question to ask your doc. Likewise I would keep one of those little hard candies in a wrap right next to me while exercising. Although not likely to be of much use if your pancreas has completely thrown in the towel. Many of us have very fatty livers, so this is an issue for many of us, exercising or just going about our day.
    Think of the bright side. In order to lose weight, you have to have the liver convert fat to sugar. Just as long as the BG does not get too high. There is a contradiction here. I used to do some exercise, not enough to really burn off any sugar. And my BG would go down. This is because exercise reduces my insulin resistance, and I start burning off sugar.
    There are some really huge benefits to exercising for a diabetic besides any of this discussion of immediate usage of BG, or Liver Dump. More muscle mass increases how much sugar your body will burn off every day. The other benefits depends on where you are in your diabetes, and may be different for different individuals. I have been told (by a Diabetes Educator) that a diabetic gets more benefit if one exercises in the evening. (?????)
    Bottom line: It might be wise to eat something before you start exercising. This is to set the conditions so the Liver is less likely to over do the release of sugar. How much of what is a good question to ask your doc.

  3. powerwalker2

    Awesome123:
    My blood sugar which is usually in the low 100s spiked to 180 after walking on a treadmill for an hour. What makes blood sugar spike after exercise? Any ideas how to prevent it?
    I've never walked more than 30 minutes at a time on the treadmill. Never had a problem with spiking afterwards. In fact, BG usually goes down. I like to spread my exercise out over several smaller segments during the day and evening. Have been doing it that way for 18 years -- the first 11 of which were with diet and exercise control only. So maybe one solution for you would be to divide your exercise into smaller, but more frequent workouts, and see what kind of results you get that way. Be sure to check pre-exercise as well as post-exercise to get a true picture. And also look at the next morning's fasting BG, where the longer-term effects of the previous day's doings usually show up.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

Related Articles

Popular Articles

More in blood sugar