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Who To Control Blood Sugar

Control Your Blood Sugar Without Drugs

Control Your Blood Sugar Without Drugs

In addition to the obvious ways of controlling your diet and getting more active physically, several supplements are known to be beneficial in controlling blood sugar. Cinnamon One gram (slightly less than a half teaspoon) of cinnamon per day was given to 60 volunteers with type 2 diabetes. In just 40 days, this small amount of cinnamon reduced fasting glucose levels anywhere from 18 to 29 percent, triglyceride levels 23 to 30 percent, LDL cholesterol levels 7 to 27 percent, and total cholesterol 12 to 26 percent. No advantages or greater improvements were found when larger doses were given. Also, when the participants stopped taking the cinnamon, their blood sugar levels and other readings began to return to former levels. (J Agri Food Chem 04;52:65–70) (Diabetes Care 03;26:3215–3218) Vitamin D A series of studies have shown that vitamin D levels are connected to insulin sensitivity and blood glucose levels. In a recent study, researchers at the University of California found that low vitamin D levels resulted in insulin resistance and improper function of the pancreatic cells that help produce insulin. If you, or your family, have a history of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, or hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), then adequate amounts of vitamin D are even more important. At least 30 minutes a day in the sunshine (without a sunscreen) would be helpful, and a daily multivitamin that includes a minimum of 400 IU of vitamin D would be highly recommended. And an interesting side note, some researchers now think Australia’s “slip, slop, slap” campaign [slip on a shirt, slop on sunscreen, and slap on a hat] to prevent skin cancer may have led to their current epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Studies have shown that the lower your vitamin D level, the higher your bloo Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Blood Sugar Control

Healthy Eating For Blood Sugar Control

If you have diabetes, a healthy eating plan for you is not that different from a healthy eating planfor people withoutdiabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) echoes the dietary guidelines recommended for the general public — that is, a diet centered on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes (peas and beans), and low-fat dairy products. However, you'll want to pay special attention to your carbohydrate intake. Vegetables, fruits, and whole grains provide more nutrition per calorie than refined carbohydrates and tend to be rich in fiber. Your body digests high-fiber foods more slowly — which means a more moderate rise in blood sugar. For most people with diabetes, carbohydrates should account for about 45% to 55% of the total calories you eat each day. Choose your carbohydrates wisely — ideally, from vegetables, whole grains, and fruits. Avoid highly refined carbohydrates such as white bread, pasta, and rice, as well as candy, sugary soft drinks, and sweets. Refined carbohydrates tend to cause sharp spikes in blood sugar, and can even boost triglycerides and lower helpful HDL cholesterol. Fiber comes in two forms: insoluble fiber, the kind found in whole grains, and soluble fiber, found in beans, dried peas, oats, and fruits. Soluble fiber in particular appears to lower blood sugar levels by improving insulin sensitivity, which may mean you need less diabetes medicine. And a number of studies suggest that eating plenty of fiber reduces the chances of developing heart disease — and people with diabetes need to do all they can to lower their risk. For more on healthy diet essentials, plus information on managing (and avoiding) type 2 diabetes, buy Healthy Eating for Type 2 Diabetes from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

A Natural Way To Help Control Blood Sugar

A Natural Way To Help Control Blood Sugar

Keeping blood sugar levels balanced is crucial for helping maintain energy levels and avoid complications associated with diabetes. Dietary changes, such eliminating certain foods and focusing on others, and lifestyle changes, such as exercise and stress avoidance, can and do make a difference in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. While dietary fiber doesn't supply nutrients or calories, it positively affects your blood sugar. Soluble fiber, which is soluble in water, helps stabilize blood sugar levels by delaying stomach emptying, thus slowing the rate of carbohydrate absorption, improving regulation of blood sugar and lowering your body's insulin requirements. Insoluble fiber, which isn't soluble in water, increases the speed of waste elimination, helping to prevent constipation. The recommended dietary intake is 14 grams for every 1,000 calories you consume. Most fiber-rich foods also contain other types of non-fiber carbs, such as sugar or starch, that you must keep in mind for meal planning. Focus on low-carb, non-starchy fiber sources, such as spinach, kale, broccoli, leafy greens and green beans. Fruits, potatoes, corn, peas, beans, lentils, winter squash and whole-grain breads, cereals and pastas are also rich in fiber, but higher in starchy carbohydrates. Eat Antioxidant-Rich Foods Some clinical studies suggest that people with diabetes have elevated levels of free radicals and lower levels of antioxidants that fight free radicals. Free radicals are molecules containing unpaired electrons that can damage cells and cause disease. Preliminary clinical studies show the antioxidants vitamin E, selenium and zinc may help keep blood glucose levels in a normal range, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Fruits, such as blueberries, cherries and Continue reading >>

How To Lower Blood Sugar

How To Lower Blood Sugar

1 Reduce your intake of sweets, animal products, and refined carbohydrates. Your doctor should be able to recommend a diet more specific to your needs, as there is no single perfect diet for people with high blood sugar or diabetes. However, if you have high blood sugar, it is usually a good idea to lower the amount of meat, dairy, white bread, white rice, potatoes, and sugary foods you consume.[1] 2 Eat more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. These foods and other foods high in fiber and moderate in fat are recommended for people with high blood sugar. Whole grains may not be appropriate for every person with high blood sugar, so consult your doctor before making them a major part of your diet.[2] Fresh apples, dried apricots, or peaches canned in juice or water are good choices. Avoid canned or frozen fruits that have added sugar.[3] At least 3 cups (700mL) of raw vegetables or 1.5 cups (350mL) cooked vegetables every day are recommended. Try artichokes, cucumbers, or salad greens. Fresh vegetables are better than frozen or canned ones, which sometimes have added sodium.[4] 3 Look up foods you're not certain about. If you are not certain whether a food is harmful, ask a doctor or look up the food on a glycemic index, which gives a rough idea of its effect on blood sugar (but not its overall healthiness).[8] "High glycemic" foods with a Glycemic Index rating of 70 or above should be avoided if you have high blood sugar. Replace these with "low glycemic" foods (GI rating 55 or below), such as the foods recommended above.[9][10] Foods with a rating between 55 and 70 have a "medium" rating, and can be eaten in low to moderate amounts depending on your needs. 4 Cut down on tobacco and alcohol. If you use these substances daily or imbibe them in large quantities, you cou Continue reading >>

15 Ways To Reduce Sugar Intake And Control Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

15 Ways To Reduce Sugar Intake And Control Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

Exercise to burn sugar for fuel and to increase insulin sensitivity. Avoid carbs and stock up on soluble fibre-rich foods to regulate your sugar spikes. Stay hydrated to prevent your liver from producing sugar. Chew slowly, eat chromium and magnesium-rich foods (with low glycemic indices), and reduce your portion size. Glucagon and cortisol spike sugar - avoid stress and sleep well. High blood sugar occurs when your body can’t effectively transport sugar from blood into cells. When left unchecked, this can lead to diabetes. One study from 2013 reported that over 3.2 million UK adults have type 2 diabetes, while 1 in 3 adults is classified pre-diabetic.1 2 This means that a large number of UK adults have diabetes or pre-diabetes. 15 Ways To Lower Blood Sugar Here are 15 easy ways to lower blood sugar levels naturally: 1. Exercise Regularly Regular exercise can help you lose weight and increase insulin sensitivity. Increased insulin sensitivity means your cells are better able to use the available sugar in your bloodstream. Exercise also helps your muscles use blood sugar for energy and muscle contraction. Good forms of exercise include weight lifting, brisk walking, running, biking, dancing, hiking, swimming to name but a few! 2. Control Your Carb Intake Your body breaks carbohydrates down into sugars (mostly glucose), and then insulin moves the sugars into cells. When you eat too many carbs or have problems with insulin function, this process fails and blood glucose levels rise. However, there are several things you can do about this. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends controlling carb intake by counting carbs or using a food exchange system. Some studies find that these methods can also help you plan your meals appropriately, which may further improve Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

Diabetes management requires awareness. Know what makes your blood sugar level rise and fall — And how to control these day-to-day factors. Keeping your blood sugar levels within the range recommended by your doctor can be challenging. That's because many things make your blood sugar levels change, sometimes unexpectedly. Following are some factors that can affect your blood sugar levels. Food Healthy eating is a cornerstone of healthy living — with or without diabetes. But if you have diabetes, you need to know how foods affect your blood sugar levels. It's not only the type of food you eat but also how much you eat and the combinations of food types you eat. What to do: Learn about carbohydrate counting and portion sizes. A key to many diabetes management plans is learning how to count carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the foods that often have the biggest impact on your blood sugar levels. And for people taking mealtime insulin, it's crucial to know the amount of carbohydrates in your food, so you get the proper insulin dose. Learn what portion size is appropriate for each type of food. Simplify your meal planning by writing down portions for the foods you eat often. Use measuring cups or a scale to ensure proper portion size and an accurate carbohydrate count. Make every meal well-balanced. As much as possible, plan for every meal to have a good mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins and fats. It's especially important to pay attention to the types of carbohydrates you choose. Some carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, are better for you than are others. These foods are low in carbohydrates and contain fiber that helps keep your blood sugar levels more stable. Talk to your doctor, nurse or dietitian about the best food choices and Continue reading >>

17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications

17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications

Type 2 diabetes has become a global epidemic. But did you know that it’s not just preventable but also reversible? If you have Diabetes Type 2, we have for you a bunch of helpful tips on how to bring down blood sugar. While some of us are genetically at a risk of diabetes Type 2, it is largely a lifestyle disorder today. By changing your lifestyle, you can learn how to lower blood sugar levels naturally — without the need for medication. Most diabetes medications are nothing more than a temporary-fix. They don’t address the underlying reason behind high blood sugar, which is driven by the environment. Diet and lifestyle changes can reverse diabetes, unlike medications which only treat the symptoms. The key: Make a positive change to the way you eat, sleep, stay active, and manage stress. So, let’s learn how to bring down blood sugar through 15 easy, natural ways. How To Lower Blood Sugar Naturally: 17 Actionable Tips 1. Cut Back On Carbohydrates A diet high in processed carbs adds to the sugar load in your diet. This is because all carbs get broken down into sugars upon digestion. This leads to increased blood sugar and weight gain. Avoid all carbs with a high glycemic index. We recommend a Low Carb-High Fat or LCHF diet to reverse diabetes. Ideally, only 10% of your daily caloric intake should come from carbs. The right carbs for any diabetic are fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Brown rice, quinoa, buckwheat, amaranth and millets are some whole grains that work. 2. You Need More Of The Good Fats Afraid how will you survive when cutting back on the belly-filling carbs? This is where the good fats step in. Healthy fats that provide Omega 3 fatty acids are your friends. Not only will they keep you full for longer, they will also improve your heart health Continue reading >>

Normal Regulation Of Blood Glucose

Normal Regulation Of Blood Glucose

The human body wants blood glucose (blood sugar) maintained in a very narrow range. Insulin and glucagon are the hormones which make this happen. Both insulin and glucagon are secreted from the pancreas, and thus are referred to as pancreatic endocrine hormones. The picture on the left shows the intimate relationship both insulin and glucagon have to each other. Note that the pancreas serves as the central player in this scheme. It is the production of insulin and glucagon by the pancreas which ultimately determines if a patient has diabetes, hypoglycemia, or some other sugar problem. In this Article Insulin Basics: How Insulin Helps Control Blood Glucose Levels Insulin and glucagon are hormones secreted by islet cells within the pancreas. They are both secreted in response to blood sugar levels, but in opposite fashion! Insulin is normally secreted by the beta cells (a type of islet cell) of the pancreas. The stimulus for insulin secretion is a HIGH blood glucose...it's as simple as that! Although there is always a low level of insulin secreted by the pancreas, the amount secreted into the blood increases as the blood glucose rises. Similarly, as blood glucose falls, the amount of insulin secreted by the pancreatic islets goes down. As can be seen in the picture, insulin has an effect on a number of cells, including muscle, red blood cells, and fat cells. In response to insulin, these cells absorb glucose out of the blood, having the net effect of lowering the high blood glucose levels into the normal range. Glucagon is secreted by the alpha cells of the pancreatic islets in much the same manner as insulin...except in the opposite direction. If blood glucose is high, then no glucagon is secreted. When blood glucose goes LOW, however, (such as between meals, and during Continue reading >>

Goals For Blood Glucose Control

Goals For Blood Glucose Control

People who have diabetes should be testing their blood glucose regularly at home. Regular blood glucose testing helps you determine how well your diabetes management program of meal planning, exercising and medication (if necessary) is doing to keep your blood glucose as close to normal as possible. The results of the nationwide Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) show that the closer you keep your blood glucose to normal, the more likely you are to prevent diabetes complications such as eye disease, nerve damage, and other problems. For some people, other medical conditions, age, or other issues may cause your physician to establish somewhat higher blood glucose targets for you. The following chart outlines the usual blood glucose ranges for a person who does and does not have diabetes. Use this as a guide to work with your physician and your healthcare team to determine what your target goals should be, and to develop a program of regular blood glucose monitoring to manage your condition. Time of Check Goal plasma blood glucose ranges for people without diabetes Goal plasma blood glucose ranges for people with diabetes Before breakfast (fasting) < 100 70 - 130 Before lunch, supper and snack < 110 70 - 130 Two hours after meals < 140 < 180 Bedtime < 120 90- 150 A1C (also called glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c or glycohemoglobin A1c) < 6% < 7% < = less than > = greater than > = greater than or equal to < = less than or equal to Information obtained from Joslin Diabetes Center's Guidelines for Pharmacological Management of Type 2 Diabetes. Continue reading >>

Controlling Blood Sugar During The Winter

Controlling Blood Sugar During The Winter

It’s cold, there are fewer hours of sunlight and you are tired of dealing with your diabetes. For many people with diabetes, as the temperature drops, blood sugars rise. That's because when snow, ice and cold weather keep you inside, you may exercise less and eat more. Here are a few tips to better control your blood sugars during the winter months — and keep those winter blues away! Warm up your body Exercise lowers your blood sugar, helps your body use insulin better, keeps you warm, and can even improve your mood. There are lots of ways to get active without ever leaving your home (besides shoveling snow!). Try yoga, climbing the stairs a few times, dancing, using a Wii or Xbox Kinect — even cleaning your room. Get your muscles moving to warm up, clear your head and lower your blood sugar. Stay healthy When you're sick, your diabetes is more difficult to control. If you do get a cold, virus or flu and you develop ketones, make sure you follow your sick day rules. Contact your nurse practitioner if ketones persist. To help stay healthy during the winter: Make sure to get your flu shot Get 7-8 hours of sleep a night Wash your hands frequently If you do get sick, stay home Eat well Remember to count the carbs for ALL of the food that you are eating. Dose your insulin correctly for what you eat. Stews and soups with lots of delicious veggies can help keep you warm and are often healthy choices. Some people order out more often so they don’t have to make a shopping trip out in the cold. Food that is ordered out like pizza or pasta and premade frozen dinners can be loaded with extra calories, salt and fat. When you cook in your own kitchen, you know exactly what goes into the meal. You can also make sure that you have veggies and fruit for each meal. You’ll also Continue reading >>

14 Amazing Herbs That Lower Blood Sugar

14 Amazing Herbs That Lower Blood Sugar

We live in a world where prescription medicine is getting more and more expensive as well as controversial. Alternative medicine is gaining momentum and with good reason! The same is true for treatments for diabetes type 2. You have therapies that can reverse diabetes through lifestyle and diet changes, natural supplements that can help stabilize blood sugar levels, and also herbs that lower blood sugar. Not only are these alternative therapies safer, but they are also easier on your pocket, on your body and mind. Maintaining normal blood sugar levels is necessary for the body’s overall health. Erratic blood sugar levels can affect the body’s ability to function normally and even lead to complications if left unchecked. Some herbs and spices found in nature do a tremendous job of naturally lowering blood sugar levels, making them a boon for diabetics and pre-diabetics. What’s more, being nature’s multi-taskers, herbs and spices also produce overall health benefits beyond just helping balance blood sugar. We want to clarify one thing right away – not everything on our list can be classified as ‘herbs’. However, they are all from natural sources. Herbs come from the leafy and green part of the plant. Spices are parts of the plant other than the leafy bit, such as the root, stem, bulb, bark or seeds. RELATED: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the best herbs that lower blood sugar, along with a few spices thrown in, to give you a more comprehensive list. Please note that while we normally do not use animal studies to support any dietary supplement, several herbs like garlic and ginger are considered ‘food’ and so, are used traditionally by cultures across the world in their daily diet Continue reading >>

Natural Methods For Controlling Blood Sugar

Natural Methods For Controlling Blood Sugar

Drug-free Key to Managing Diabetes Ten years ago, my brother was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. His doctor sent him home with a prescription for metformin and a DVD to inform him about lifestyle changes he could make to lower his blood sugar. Twice daily, my brother began taking the prescribed metformin. But he also chose to watch the DVD. He took his diabetes seriously and decided to follow the dietary instructions provided in the DVD. He also religiously checked his blood sugar every day. After three months, he had lost 30 pounds and reduced his metformin to once daily, because his blood sugar was dropping too low. Meanwhile, he continued following the dietary plan on the DVD. After six months, my brother went back to the doctor for a checkup. His doctor declared his diabetes reversed and took him off metformin altogether. For the past ten years, his blood sugar levels have tested normal due to the changes he made in his lifestyle and continues to follow. Happily, he doesn’t have to worry about all the terrible complications associated with diabetes and he isn’t strapped with an ever-increasing monthly drug bill. He also doesn’t have to deal with some of the nasty side-effects of taking diabetes medications. Here are 10 ways to control your blood sugar naturally! 1.Reduce your carb intake. If you do nothing else, do this! Carbohydrates are what drive blood sugar up. Your body turns carbs into sugar. This is not some fad diet, but real science! The link between carb intake and blood sugar has been established for a long time.[1]Our Diabetes Solution Kit takes the guesswork out of carb-counting and shows you exactly how much to eat through a three-phase plan. By reducing your carbs as a way of life, you’re not just lowering your blood sugar to pass an A1c test, Continue reading >>

3 Easy Tips To Lower Blood Sugar Fast

3 Easy Tips To Lower Blood Sugar Fast

Jeanette Terry was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was 11 years old, and she has since lived with diabetes through difficult life transitions, including the teenage years, college, and having children. She addresses the day-to-day struggles of living with diabetes—going beyond medical advice—to improve overall adherence and management. Extremely high blood sugar levels can be dangerous, and they can cause lasting health complications. Remember: if you ever have blood sugar readings that remain high for more than 24 hours without coming down (and after an effort has been made to lower them), you need to be addressed by a doctor. That being said, we've all had those days when we get a random high blood sugar reading and we are not sure what caused it…or we forget to give insulin, or we eat a delicious dessert without realizing how much sugar is actually in it. For whatever reason, those out of the ordinary high blood sugar readings happen and need to be treated. No need to rush to the doctor for every high blood sugar reading though. There are some simple steps you can take to lower blood sugar fast. Watch for signs of high blood sugar You know the feeling: extreme thirst, sluggishness, nausea, blurred vision, a downright sick feeling. And your family or friends may tell you that extreme irritability is a major sign you need to check your blood sugar to see if it is high. The best thing to do is to catch it before it gets really high, or it will be harder to bring down quickly, causing havoc on your blood sugar readings for days. If you do not take insulin as a part of your treatment plan, these tips will show you how to lower your blood sugar fast. If you take insulin, you will first want to give the appropriate amount of insulin to correct the blood sugar. Continue reading >>

How Stevia May Help To Control Blood Sugar

How Stevia May Help To Control Blood Sugar

An increasing number of people are opting for more healthful alternatives to sugar, and stevia has become a popular choice, particularly among people with diabetes. Studies have suggested that the natural, no-calorie sweetener can help to control blood sugar levels, although exactly how it achieves this has been unclear - until now. Researchers from the United Kingdom and Belgium have found that stevia activates a protein called TRPM5, which is associated with taste perception. This protein also plays a role in the release of the hormone insulin after eating. Study co-author Koenraad Philippaert, of the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at KU Leuven in Belgium, and colleagues say that their findings could open the door to new treatments for type 2 diabetes. The researchers recently reported their results in the journal Nature Communications. Stevia is a sweetener derived from the leaves of the Stevia rebaudiana plant - commonly known as sweetleaf - which is native to South America. Stevia is around 200 to 400 times sweeter than table sugar, and it is often used as a sugar substitute in diet soda, candy, yogurts, desserts, and other foods and beverages. Stevia targets protein responsible for sweet taste, insulin secretion The plant-based sweetener is generally considered safe for people with diabetes in moderation, and previous research has indicated that stevia may even help to control blood sugar levels. The mechanisms underlying stevia's positive effect on blood sugar levels have, however, not been well-understood. The new study from Philippaert and colleagues aimed to shed some light. In experiments involving cell cultures, the researchers found that stevia activates TRPM5, which is a protein important for the perception of sweet, bitter, and umami tastes Continue reading >>

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

If you get a high reading when checking your blood sugar, is there a way to get the number down quickly? Continue reading >>

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