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When Is Blood Sugar High

8 Signs You Might Have High Blood Sugar

8 Signs You Might Have High Blood Sugar

You’ve heard people complain about having low blood sugar before and may have even experienced it yourself. But high blood sugar is also an issue that can a) make you feel like crap and b) cause serious health issues if it happens too often. First, a primer: High blood sugar occurs when the level of glucose (i.e. sugar) in your blood becomes elevated. We get our glucose from food, and most foods we eat impact our blood sugar in one way or another, certified dietitian-nutritionist Lisa Moskovitz, R.D., CEO of NY Nutrition Group, tells SELF. “However, foods that are higher in carbohydrates and sugar, yet lower in fat and fiber, such as baked goods, white-flour breads, soda, and candy usually have a bigger impact on blood sugar levels,” she says. In the short-term, they cause sudden rises in blood sugar (i.e. high blood sugar), which can immediately give you a jolt of energy but will inevitably be followed up by a crash. These foods are also usually not great for you, Moskovitz points out, and can cause excess weight gain, high cholesterol, and bodily inflammation. Having high blood sugar here and there happens, and it will basically just make you feel off. You’ll feel worn-out, headachy, all-around tired, cranky, and may have difficulty concentrating, Jessica Cording, a New York-based R.D., tells SELF. But the major problem lies in having chronically high blood sugar, which can lead to type 2 diabetes, a condition in which your body can’t properly regulate blood sugar. If you get chronic high blood sugar, you’ll also often experience the need to pee frequently, increased thirst, and even have blurred vision, Alissa Rumsey, M.S., R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells SELF. But if you’re not suffering from chronic high blood su Continue reading >>

Why Do We Want To Eat More Sweets When Our Blood Sugar Is High (like 180)?

Why Do We Want To Eat More Sweets When Our Blood Sugar Is High (like 180)?

I’ve never known a diabetic who went into a coma with blood sugars of 370, but that is high enough that you’ll be getting disturbances of electrolytes that affect how your brain works. Lots of diabetics get a little manic when their sugars are over 300 or so. Coma is more of an 600 to 1200 thing. People have misconceptions about the effects of low sugars, too. I’ve also known a diabetic who had a sugar of 12 and could drive—well enough to stop her car when she was pursued by the police, get out, and slug the cop. (She didn’t have to go jail.) I have been functional enough to walk through a large building to get a Coke (glucose is better, by the way, but I had forgotten mine) when my sugars were 22 (remembered the glucometer, forgot the glucose). Why do you want more sweets when your blood sugars are high? Two things are going on. When your blood sugar levels go up, cells protect themselves from getting flooded with sugar by switching off insulin receptors. They become “resistant.” However, at the same time they aren’t getting the sugars they ordinarily need. Your pancreas tries to lower your sugars by releasing even more insulin (if you’re type 2), so your cells become even more insulin resistant, and even more fuel-deprived….you get the idea. You’re trying to force sugar into your system by craving sweets, not consciously, of course, but the more you eat the more you crave. This is why diabetes is so hard to manage. Continue reading >>

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

What Does It Feel Like To Have High Blood Sugar Levels?

The human body naturally has sugar, or glucose, in the blood. The right amount of blood sugar gives the body's cells and organs energy. The liver and muscles produce some blood sugar, but most of it comes from food and drinks that contain carbohydrates. In order to keep blood sugar levels within a normal range, the body needs insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes blood sugar and delivers it to the body's cells. Contents of this article: What does it feel like to have high blood sugar levels? Blood sugar is fuel for the body's organs and functions. But having high blood sugar doesn't provide a boost in energy. In fact, it's often the opposite. Because the body's cells can't access the blood sugar for energy, a person may feel tiredness, hunger, or exhaustion frequently. In addition, high sugar in the blood goes into the kidneys and urine, which attracts more water, causing frequent urination. This can also lead to increased thirst, despite drinking enough liquids. High blood sugar can cause sudden or unexplained weight loss. This occurs because the body's cells aren't getting the glucose they need, so the body burns muscle and fat for energy instead. High blood sugar can also cause numbness, burning, or tingling in the hands, legs, and feet. This is caused by diabetic neuropathy, a complication of diabetes that often occurs after many years of high blood sugar levels. What does high blood sugar mean for the rest of the body? Over time, the body's organs and systems can be harmed by high blood sugar. Blood vessels become damaged, and this can lead to complications, including: Damage to the eye and loss of vision Kidney disease or failure Nerve problems in the skin, especially the feet, leading to sores, infections, and wound healing problems Causes of high blood sugar Continue reading >>

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

Adapted from The Carb Sensitivity Program It is no exaggeration—balancing your blood sugar could be a matter of life or death. Chronic high blood sugar levels are toxic to your body, destroying organs and blood vessels and paving the way to a heart attack, type 2 diabetes, stroke, dialysis, nerve damage, erectile dysfunction, or even blindness. The good news? Out-of-control sugar levels can be reigned in and regulated with the right foods. Here are most potent blood sugar-lowering foods so you know how to lower blood sugar levels naturally. Blood Sugar Benefit: A groundbreaking study published in the Journal of Nutrition in 2010 found a daily dose of the bioactive ingredients from blueberries increases sensitivity to insulin and may reduce the risk of developing diabetes in at-risk individuals. That's important because too many carbs produces too much insulin, which could lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adding blueberries to daily smoothies for six weeks also improves insulin sensitivity, so feel free to eat healthy doses of the superfood fruit, too. Added Perk: Low in naturally occurring sugars, blueberries are also packed with antioxidants that fight damage from free radicals, accelerated aging, and diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's. Blood Sugar Benefit: Don't let the fat content of avocados fool you—they're still good for you! Avocados are full of monounsaturated fat, the kind that helps slow the release of sugars into the bloodstream, prompting less insulin release, and can even help to lower your cholesterol. Added Perk: Avocados contain beta-sitosterol, a compound that could help quell inflammation after an intense workout. Just limit yourself to one-quarter of an avocado at a time to avoid calorie overload. Or, try avocado oil drizzled on a Continue reading >>

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

If you get a high reading when checking your blood sugar, is there a way to get the number down quickly? Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar That Might Indicate I Have Diabetes?

What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar That Might Indicate I Have Diabetes?

Question: What are the symptoms of high blood sugar that might indicate I have diabetes? Answer: First of all there may not be any symptoms of high blood sugar, so it is worth screening if you have a strong family history, if you have a reason to think that you may have diabetes, because sometimes it's asymptomatic and it's important to know if your blood sugar is high and if you do have diabetes and get it under control early. But if the blood sugar goes very high then lets say over 200 or so, then it can cause symptoms and the classic symptoms would be increased thirst, increased urination, general fatigue, vaginal infections in women, and even blurred vision can occur from the high blood sugar. These symptoms, as I say, may not occur, or they may occur in any combination, but what's causing them is that the sugar is thickening the blood, so it's really like taking maple syrup and pouring maple syrup into a glass of water. If you do that after a while, the water gets thicker and thicker, and in the bloodstream, the brain then reads that as the blood's too thick, I need to drink in order to dilute back out the blood, and when I drink and I drink, sometime people with diabetes drink gallons of water in a day, when drink and I drink, I have to put it somewhere, and where I put it is to urinate it out. That's not really solving the problem, it's not really curing the diabetes in any way or treating it, but thirst and urination is the classic symptom of diabetes and indicates that you do need help. Next: What Is Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) And What Are Its Symptoms? Previous: What Causes High Blood Sugar And What Harm Can It Do To My Body? Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Stumped by high fasting blood glucose results? Join the club. "It just doesn't compute. When I snack before bed, my fastings are lower than when I limit my night nibbles," says Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. "It's logical for people to point the finger for high fasting blood sugar numbers at what they eat between dinner and bed, but surprisingly food isn't the lead villain," says Robert Chilton, M.D., a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The true culprit is compromised hormonal control of blood glucose levels. The Essential Hormones During the years (up to a decade) that type 2 diabetes develops, the hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. Four hormones are involved in glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, a group of hormones secreted from the intestines that includes glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available. {C} How the Essential Hormones Work in the Body When d Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Build Muscle As A Type 1 Diabetic When My Blood Sugar Is Very High? I Just Want To Make Sure That It's Not A Useless Workout If My Blood Sugar Gets Too High.

Is It Possible To Build Muscle As A Type 1 Diabetic When My Blood Sugar Is Very High? I Just Want To Make Sure That It's Not A Useless Workout If My Blood Sugar Gets Too High.

Dr Leahy is right — building muscle should be the least of your worries right now. If you don’t get your blood sugar under control, you will suffer permanent damage to your kidneys, your circulation, your heart, your eyes. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of heart disease and kidney disease, the leading cause of blindness, and in some age groups the leading cause of loss of limbs. Fortunately, exercise is one of the things you need to do to lower your blood sugar, and exercising will build muscle. Eating properly and taking insulin or diabetes medication are the other two most basic things you should be doing. Talk to a diabetes doctor or other diabetes specialist about your situation, your high blood sugars, your desire to build muscle, and anything else going on with your health. Work with them to put together a regimen that will help you achieve what you hope for, and then follow it. Diabetes is not something to mess around with. Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia is a hallmark sign of diabetes (both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes) and prediabetes. Other conditions that can cause hyperglycemia are pancreatitis, Cushing's syndrome, unusual hormone-secreting tumors, pancreatic cancer, certain medications, and severe illnesses. The main symptoms of hyperglycemia are increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate. Severely elevated glucose levels can result in a medical emergency like diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS, also referred to as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state). Insulin is the treatment of choice for people with type 1 diabetes and for life-threatening increases in glucose levels. People with type 2 diabetes may be managed with a combination of different oral and injectable medications. Hyperglycemia due to medical conditions other than diabetes is generally treated by treating the underlying condition responsible for the elevated glucose. Blood Sugar Swings: Tips for Managing Diabetes & Glucose Levels A number of medical conditions can cause hyperglycemia, but the most common by far is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes affects over 8% of the total U.S. population. In diabetes, blood glucose levels rise either because there is an insufficient amount of insulin in the body or the body cannot use insulin well. Normally, the pancreas releases insulin after a meal so that the cells of the body can utilize glucose for fuel. This keeps blood glucose levels in the normal range. Type 1 diabetes is responsible for about 5% of all cases of diabetes and results from damage to the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is far more common and is related to the body's inability to effectively use insulin. In addition to type 1 and type 2, gestational diabe Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Emergencies

High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Blood sugar levels that are too high (hyperglycemia) can quickly turn into a diabetic emergency without quick and appropriate treatment. The best way to avoid dangerously high blood sugar levels is to self-test to stay in tune with your body, and to stay attuned to the symptoms and risk factors for hyperglycemia. Extremely high blood sugar levels can lead to one of two conditions—diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS; also called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma). Although both syndromes can occur in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, DKA is more common in type 1, and HHNS is more common in type 2. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Ketoacidosis (or DKA) occurs when blood sugars become elevated (over 249 mg/dl, or 13.9 mmol/l) over a period of time and the body begins to burn fat for energy, resulting in ketone bodies in the blood or urine (a phenomenon called ketosis). A variety of factors can cause hyperglycemia (high blood glucose), including failure to take medication or insulin, stress, dietary changes without medication adjustments, eating disorders, and illness or injury. This last cause is important, because if illness brings on DKA, it may slip by unnoticed, since its symptoms can mimic the flu (aches, vomiting, etc.). In fact, people with type 1 diabetes are often seeking help for the flu-like symptoms of DKA when they first receive their diagnosis. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis may include: fruity (acetone) breath nausea and/or vomiting abdominal pain dry, warm skin confusion fatigue breathing problems excessive thirst frequent urination in extreme cases, loss of consciousness DKA is a medical emergency, and requires prompt and immediate treatment. A simple over-the-counter urine dipstick test (e.g., Keto Continue reading >>

Why Did A Teacher Not Let Me Use The Bathroom When My Blood Sugar Was High, But She Always Lets Girls Go?

Why Did A Teacher Not Let Me Use The Bathroom When My Blood Sugar Was High, But She Always Lets Girls Go?

It isn’t necessarily discrimination, since “girl stuff” isn’t going to the bathroom but rather making sure that young ladies don’t have menstrual blood stain their clothes. That’s pretty simple and is universally accepted. I’m sure that if you were worried about having menstrual blood stain your clothes, you could have appealed based upon those grounds, but I’m also fairly sure that your teacher wouldn’t have believed you. You are in a completely separate boat from those young ladies. That being said, it is completely inappropriate for a teacher to stop you from using the restroom when you need to go. More importantly, it didn’t have to happen. Diabetes is a disability and is thus covered under section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.[1] You should have been able to file for a 504 plan on these grounds. One of the common accommodations for a student with a 504 plan is, unsurprisingly, more access to restrooms.[2] Thus, you would have been legally protected. It is unfortunate that more parents and educators don’t know that such issues have a legal remedy which should be implemented before the student leaves the school system in order to make sure that the student can take that plan forward to the university level. This all assumes that you are in the United States. Other countries may have their own form of legal protections for individuals with disabilities. That all being said, I think keeping students from using the restroom unless they have shown themselves to be completely untrustworthy is wrong in my opinion. Students need to use the restroom as necessary. Only students can really determine when that is. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes High Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes High Blood Sugar Symptoms

Wondering about the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia—or high blood sugar? High blood sugar occurs in type 1 diabetes when the body has too much glucose/food or not enough insulin. Having hyperglycemia symptoms doesn’t immediately put you in danger but regular high blood-sugar levels over time does. That’s because they can lead to complications including blindness, heart disease, kidney failure and amputation. What are the symptoms of high blood sugar? – Thirst – Frequent urination – Stomach pain – Blurry vision – Increased Hunger Other signs of hyperglycemia With high blood sugar, you may also experience drowsiness, exhaustion, nausea or vomiting, confusion, fruity or sweet-smelling breath, impaired concentration and sweating. And, having very high blood-glucose levels for an extended period can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA happens when the body starts to burn fat and body tissue for energy. This releases toxic acids called ketones that build up in the blood and urine—and can lead to a diabetic coma. So if you’re experiencing any of the above signs or symptoms, it’s important to get checked out by your doctor. The earlier high blood-sugar issues are treated, the better. Your support is more critical than ever Continue reading >>

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

One of the challenges of managing diabetes is maintaining consistent blood sugar (glucose) levels. Even with diligence, some situations can cause high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, while others can bring on low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. So it’s important to know the signs of both high and low levels, and what actions to take to bring them back within a desired range. Monitoring your blood sugar levels with a glucose meter will do a lot to help you keep those levels steady and avoid the complications that can come with diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, how often you check your blood sugar level depends on many factors, including your age, the type and severity of your diabetes, the length of time that you've had the condition, and the presence of any diabetes-related complications. About High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Common signs of high blood sugar include frequent urination, fatigue, dry or itchy skin, feeling thirsty, more frequent infections, and eating more food but not gaining as much weight as usual, says Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD of the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute in San Diego, California. A blood sugar reading above 180 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered above normal and can bring on these symptoms, although it’s possible to have high blood sugar without any symptoms, Dr. Philis-Tsimikas says. A reading above 300 mg/dL is considered severe. If your blood sugar is above 250 mg/dL for two days, Philis-Tsimikas advises informing your doctor and asking for specific treatment recommendations. Blood sugar levels above 300 mg/dL can cause nausea, drowsiness, blurred vision, confusion, and dizziness, especially when standing up from a sitting or lying position. Ways to treat high blood sugar include: Taking your prescribed medicati Continue reading >>

How Does Blood Pressure Affect A Person's Blood Sugar In A Diabetic?

How Does Blood Pressure Affect A Person's Blood Sugar In A Diabetic?

Two out of every three adult diabetics have high blood pressure, according to the American Diabetes Association. The condition forces your heart to work harder, and your risk for heart disease, stroke and hardening of the arteries increases as a result. In most cases, poorly controlled blood sugar has a negative effect on your blood pressure, but there are a number of mechanisms by which your blood pressure can affect your blood sugar. In either case, controlling blood pressure is as important as controlling blood sugar for a diabetic. Video of the Day In many cases of diabetes, blood sugar affects the blood pressure. When glucose stays in your bloodstream too long, it can act like a slow poison, according to the National Kidney Disease Education Program. Uncontrolled blood sugar can damage the nephrons, the functional units of your kidneys that play a role in regulating your blood pressure. This can cause high blood pressure. Diabetes and high blood pressure are the main causes of kidney disease. Because of the risks for hypertension and heart disease, the American Diabetes Association recommends diabetics strive for a lower blood pressure reading, 130/80 mmHg, than that of the general public. In rare cases, diabetes and low blood sugar can cause hypotension, or low blood pressure. Although the link is somewhat controversial, a report by the Diabetes Action Research & Education Foundation said that both acute and chronic stress can trigger high blood pressure. Stress response can also increase your blood sugar. In cases of acute stress, the blood sugar’s rise is helpful. It fuels your brain to respond to the immediate crisis. However, ongoing stress can keep your blood sugar levels elevated, according to a report published by the Wellmark Foundation. Some public heal Continue reading >>

How Shall I Control Blood Sugar When Being Found With High Blood Sugar At Age 32?

How Shall I Control Blood Sugar When Being Found With High Blood Sugar At Age 32?

OK, you haven't said exactly what your readings were but we can assume you are either pre-diabetic or diabetic. If you follow conventional medical advice, which treats diabetes II as a chronic incurable disease, your life will follow a predictable path of… Taking diabetic medication Eventually moving onto insulin as well as medication poorly controlled high blood sugar (best determined by HbA1c) Damage to your vascular system which will result in cardiovascular disease and damage to your heart, eyes, kidneys and lower limbs (amputation) OR, you can take control of your diabetes by adopting a low carb diet (ketogenic) and essentially put your diabetes into remission, avoiding most if not all the medications and all its resulting side effects. Ketogenic diet treatment of obesity and diabetes is not a fad or quackery followed by people at the fringes. It has been scientifically proven to be effective over and over again, but is still only followed by early adopters and smarter people who’ve educated themselves. There are many many success stories. I personally think it is real CRIMINAL NEGLIGENCE to put you on the medication/side effects path, when it is possible to avoid this completely. I second Ron Hunter in recommending Dr Jason Fung’s videos as a great way to start educating yourself on what will most probably be a lifelong issue for you to manage. The sooner you take control of this the better chance you have of avoiding the side effects. Some of the manufactured insulins are very expensive (in the US) so there are financial gains to be made too. Continue reading >>

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