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When Blood Sugar Is Over 500

Blood Sugar Levels Over 500

Blood Sugar Levels Over 500

Ever wondered what the blood sugar reading is all about? Ever heard somebody telling that their blood glucose levels rose to 500 once? Well, if somebody experiences blood sugar levels of as high as 500, it is certainly a medical emergency that needs to be responded to immediately; else the condition can quickly turn fatal. Optimal blood glucose levels are crucial to the health and survival of an individual, since glucose is the main energy source for the body. In a normal human body, blood sugar levels begin to rise after a meal, which causes pancreas to release insulin in order to help the cells use glucose for energy. On the other hand is a diabetic, whose blood glucose levels rise when pancreas secrete little or no insulin for control sugar levels. In some patients, these levels may rise as high as 500 mg, which is truly a life-threatening condition. Such a condition may cause serious complications for pregnant women, resulting in birth defects. The condition wherein the level of blood sugars scale over 500 mg can be devastating. If such a condition is left untreated, it can cause severe complications, including blindness, gangrene, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, depression, nerve damage, kidney malfunction, diabetic neuropathy, and limb amputation. Blood sugars over 500 mg can cause extreme damage to the retina of the eye - one of the prime causes of blindness in diabetics. Such a high glucose level can damage nerves and cause wounds that never heal, gangrene, and ulcers. In some patients, diabetic neuropathy may require foot and leg amputations. Uncontrolled blood sugar levels can severely damage the kidneys. Such a state is known as diabetic nephropathy - the prime cause of kidney failure in diabetics. People with high blood glucose are easily susceptible to Continue reading >>

What Is Blood Sugar/high Blood Sugar

What Is Blood Sugar/high Blood Sugar

Diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia, which is abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream, so everyone with type 1 and type 2 diabetes has experienced hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia occurs when the body is not properly processing or using glucose, which is the case when insulin levels are low or nonexistent, and normally the excess amounts of glucose in the body is converted to glucogon or fat and stored for later use. Catabolic hormones such as glucagon, growth hormone, catecholamines, thyroxine and somatostatin, will increase blood sugar levels, but only insulin, which is an anabolic hormone, will decrease blood glucose levels. Since insulin is responsible for maintaining safe and healthy blood sugar levels in your body, if it is no longer present or not being produced in sufficient quantities, excess glucose will remain in your bloodstream. The excess glucose in your blood, if allowed to continually increase without treatment, will not only eventually cause serious complications, it can even kill you! Normal range blood sugar levels The standard unit for measuring blood glucose levels around the world is millimoles per liter (mmol/L), but in the U.S. blood glucose levels are measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Blood sugar levels are usually at their lowest in the morning and are commonly known as "fasting blood sugar levels" and should be tested first thing upon waking, before breakfast. In people without diabetes the normal range of blood glucose levels eight to twelve hours after their last meal is between 70 to 100 mg/dL (3.8 to 5.5 mmol/L). Glucose levels rise by a few grams after meals for about an hour or two, so it is usually tested two hours after the end of the meal. In those without diabetes, the normal blood sugar levels aft Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

Hyperglycemia in Dogs A dog with abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood is said to have hyperglycemia. A simple carbohydrate sugar that circulates in the blood, glucose is a major source of energy for the body, of which normal levels range between 75-120mg. Insulin, a hormone that is produced and released by the pancreas into the bloodstream when glucose levels rise, plays a key role in maintaining normal sugar levels. Low levels or absolute deficiency of insulin results in abnormally high blood sugar levels. Some of the causes for hyperglycemia may be pancreatitis, and the resulting inability to produce insulin; normally occurring hormones, especially in female dogs; diet; and infections of the body (such as teeth, or urinary tract). Middle aged and older dogs are more at risk for developing hyperglycemia, and it is more common in female dogs than in males. Any breed can be affected, but some smaller breeds appear to be more disposed, including beagles, cairn terriers, dachshunds, miniature poodles and schnauzers. Symptoms and Types Clinical symptoms may vary depending on the underlying disease/condition. Your dog may not be showing any serious symptoms, especially those if the increased sugar is thought to be temporary, hormonal, or stress induced hyperglycemia. Some of the more common symptoms include: Depression Weight loss Excessive hunger Dehydration Bloodshot eyes (due to inflamed blood vessels) Liver enlargement Nerve damage in legs Severe depression (in cases of very high blood sugar levels) Non-healing wounds;infection is increased as the excess sugar feeds fungal and bacterial invaders Tissue damage (due to oxidizing [burning] effect of the excess sugar in the tissue) Causes Other than high stress situations, harmful drug interactions (such as with he Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome Severe high blood sugars, ketosis (the presence of ketones prior to acidification of the blood), and ketoacidosis (DKA) are serious and potentially life-threatening medical problems which can occur in diabetes. High blood sugars become life-threatening in Type 1 or long-term Type 2 diabetes only when that person does not receive enough insulin from injections or an insulin pump. This can be caused by skipping insulin or not receiving enough insulin when large amounts are required due to an infection or other major stress. Ketoacidosis surprisingly occurs almost as often in Type 2 diabetes as it does in Type 1. However, people with Type 2 diabetes also encounter another dangerous condition called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome, which is roughly translated as thick blood due to very high blood sugars. Here, coma and death can occur simply because the blood sugar is so high. The blood will have ketones at higher levels but does not become acidotic. HHS usually occurs with blood sugar readings above 700 mg/dl (40 mmol) as the brain and other functions begin to shut down. When insulin levels are low, the body cannot use glucose present at high levels in the blood. The body then starts burning excessive amounts of fat which causes the blood to become acidic as excess ketone byproducts are produced. Even though the blood pH which measures acidity only drops from its normal level of 7.4 down to 7.1 or 7.0, this small drop is enough to inactivate enzymes that depend on a precise acid-base balance to operate. High blood sugars and ketoacidosis can be triggered by: not taking insulin severe infection severe illness bad insulin In Type 1 diabetes, ketoacidosis often occurs under the duress of an infection, and is also freque Continue reading >>

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

My uncle, like all his family, was a bit of a cheapskate. He hated to spend money unless it was absolutely necessary. He was thin and active, having only recently given up a career as a singer and dancer performing weekly on a nationally televised variety show. So when he felt unwell one weekend night, he turned down his wife's suggestion that she drive him to the emergency room and told her he'd wait til Monday when he could see his family doctor. Why waste all that money on an ER visit that was probably unnecessary? As it turned out, he didn't need to see his doctor on Monday. He died that night. He was a few years younger than I am now and the fatal heart attack he experienced was the first symptom he had of our family's odd form of inherited diabetes. But this is why, even though I've inherited the family "cheap" gene, if there's any possibility something dangerous is going on, I head for the ER. Usually it is a waste of money. I was in a small car accident a few weeks ago that left me with nerve pain running up and down my arms and legs. I sat for four hours at our local ER, saw the doctor for five minutes, and was sent home. The diagnosis, whiplash. The treatment, wait and see if it gets worse. The bill? Over $900. I went to the ER because I'd called my family doctor's office and they told me to. Whiplash usually resolves on its own, but occasionally it can cause swelling in your neck that can kill you. I'm not equipped to judge what kind I had, and unlike my uncle, I wasn't about to gamble. So with this in mind, you can understand my reaction when a stranger contacted me recently, after reading my web page, and told me that his blood sugar, which had been normal until very recently, was testing in the 500s on his meter except when his meter wasn't able to give hi Continue reading >>

What Are The Dangers Of A Sugar Count Over 500?

What Are The Dangers Of A Sugar Count Over 500?

Blood sugar control is a critical aspect of diabetes management. People without diabetes typically have fasting blood sugar readings below 100 milligrams per deciliter. If you are diabetic, your doctor sets an individualized blood sugar goal that you aim for with the help of an individualized treatment regimen. A reading higher than your target indicates your blood sugar is not under control, and having a reading over 500 is a medical emergency. Your body needs glucose to function properly, but it's unhealthy for high levels to circulate in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin regulates blood sugar by allowing glucose to get into your cells. Typically, blood sugar is considered high when it's 160 milligrams per deciliter or above your glucose target, notes the Joslin Diabetes Center. Your doctor may need to adjust your treatment plan if your glucose remains above 180 milligrams per deciliter for three consecutive days. If glucose stays elevated for a long time, it can affect your eyes, kidneys and heart. Ketoacidosis A dangerously high blood sugar level increases your risk for diabetes-related ketoacidosis. When glucose circulates in your bloodstream and can't get into your cells, your cells don't get the energy they need. To compensate, your body begins to burn fat for fuel, producing acids called ketones. These acids build up in your bloodstream and can poison your body when levels get too high. This happens when your body doesn't have enough insulin and is more common with Type 1 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends checking your urine for ketones when your glucose is higher than 240 milligrams per deciliter. Hyperosmolar Syndrome Your kidneys typically excrete extra glucose to help compensate for high blood sugar levels, but when glucose is extrem Continue reading >>

About Blood Glucose Over 500

About Blood Glucose Over 500

Glucose is a type of sugar that is found in the bloodstream. Blood glucose is the main energy source of the body. Having a healthy blood glucose or blood sugar level is important to optimal health and survival. As glucose in the blood begins to rise, typically after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin to help the cells of the body use the glucose for fuel and energy. If someone is a diabetic, and his pancreas secretes little to no insulin into the bloodstream, the blood sugar levels begin to rise. If not treated properly with an insulin injection, the levels can quickly rise over 500mg. Any blood glucose level over 500mg is considered a medical emergency. Video of the Day Most people who have had a blood glucose level over 500mg are considered diabetic. According to the American Diabetes Association, over 23.6 million people have diabetes. Diabetes is a serious disease that causes unstable blood sugar levels. There are three main types of diabetes; Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. Type I generally occurs when a patient is young and is sometimes referred to as juvenile diabetes. Type 2 is a condition in which the body does not produce enough insulin to bring blood sugars down, the patient becomes dependent on insulin injections. Gestational diabetes occurs when a woman becomes pregnant. If blood sugar levels are not brought down or treated, it can lead to serious conditions and birth defects that can harm both mother and child. When a blood glucose level gets over 500mg, one of the first things a doctor will do is determine what is causing the high blood sugar level. Generally, the cause is uncontrolled diabetes. As someone continues to eat foods that may be high in sugar or high in carbohydrate, his blood sugar levels begin to rise over normal levels. If his b Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) (cont.) If hyperglycemia persists for at least two or three days, or if ketones appear in the urine, call a doctor. Generally, people with diabetes should test their blood sugar levels at least four times a day: before meals and at bedtime (or following the schedule advised by the prescribed individual diabetes care plan). The urine should be checked for ketones any time the blood sugar level is over 250 mg/dL. When blood sugar stays high despite following a diabetic diet and plan of care, call the nurse, diabetes health educator, or physician for adjustments in the diet. If blood sugars are high because of illness, check for ketones and contact a health professional. Vomiting Confusion Sleepiness Shortness of breath Dehydration Blood sugar levels that stay above 160 mg/dL for longer than a week Glucose readings higher than 300 mg/dL The presence of ketones in the urine Ketoacidosis or diabetic coma is a medical emergency. Call 911 for emergency transport to a hospital or similar emergency center. Please ask your health care professional about the following: How to recognize high blood sugar levels How to treat a high blood sugar level when it occurs in you, a family member, or coworkers How to prevent the blood sugar level from becoming too high How to contact the medical staff during an emergency What emergency supplies to carry to treat high blood sugar Additional educational materials regarding high blood sugar Check blood sugar levels with a blood glucose meter. If blood sugar level is higher than normal, but there are no symptoms, continue routine care such as: Take all diabetes medications on schedule. Eat regular meals. Drink sugar-free and caffeine-free liquids. Take a blood sugar reading every four hours (write it down) u Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Over 500: Risks And Prevention

Blood Sugar Levels Over 500: Risks And Prevention

Risks of Blood Sugar Levels Over 500 Having blood sugar at optimal levels is important for health and survival, for glucose is the body’s main energy source. In a healthy human body, when blood sugar rises after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin to help the cells use the glucose for energy. In a diabetic, either the pancreas does not secrete insulin or the body is unable to utilize it effectively, causing blood sugar to build up in the bloodstream to levels that are higher than normal, a condition called hyperglycemia. If left untreated, blood sugar levels can rise dangerously high,and blood sugar levels over 500 mg/dl can be life-threatening. If blood glucose levels are brought under control, it can lead to serious health complications and even cause birth defects in case of pregnant women. Blood sugar levels over 500 mg/dl can lead to: Damage to the retina, the leading cause of blindness in diabetics. Damage to the nerves, particularly in the legs and feet. In most of the diabetic cases, diabetic neuropathy leads to foot and leg amputations. Damage to the kidneys. This state, known as diabetic nephropathy, is the leading cause of kidney failure. High blood pressure and hypertension. Atherosclerosis, the hardening of the arteries that leads to reduced blood flow to vital organs, such as heart and brain. This can have severe complications in the form of a heart attack or stroke. A heart attack can occur if the blood flow to the coronary arteries decreases and a stroke can be the result of reduced blood flow to the brain. It can even lead to decreased circulation in the arms and legs. Diabetic cardiomyopathy, the inflammation of heart's muscle tissue. Damage to the nerves in the autonomic nervous system, leading to gastroparesis, the paralysis of the stomach. In so Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

A healthy dog has a blood glucose level ranging from 75 mg to 120 mg. A dog is diagnosed with high blood sugar, or as hyperglycemic, when it exhibits high blood glucose, or sugar above the normal range. Elevated blood sugar may be temporary, stress-induced, or a sign of a serious underlying disease such as pancreatitis or diabetes mellitus. High blood sugar is more common in female than male dogs, and is more likely to occur in older dogs. Elevated blood glucose can occur transiently fairly often for various reasons (diet, stress, exertion, medications). Moderately elevated glucose can indicate infections (dental, kidneys, bladder), inflammatory conditions (pancreatitis) and hormonal imbalances (Hyperadrenocorticism). However persistent high glucose levels in the blood is diagnostic of Diabetes Mellitus. High blood Sugar causes increased thirst and urination. See a veterinarian promptly if your dogs shows these symptoms. The warning signs for high blood sugar are varied. If your dog’s high blood sugar is temporary or the result of stress or medication, you may not see any symptoms. However, if it is the result of a serious disease, you will likely see some of the following: Wounds not healing; infections worsening Depression Enlarged liver Urinary tract or kidney infection Bloodshot eyes Cataracts Extreme fluctuation in weight, gaining or losing Obesity Hyperactivity Excessive thirst or hunger Increased frequency of urination High blood sugar can indicate one of the following issues: Diabetes mellitus, caused by a loss of pancreatic beta cells, which leads to decreased production of insulin, rending the dog unable to process sugar sufficiently. Pancreatitis, inflammation of the pancreas, which can damage insulin-producing cells, inhibiting the dog’s ability to proce Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Somogyi Effect

Diabetes And The Somogyi Effect

I have had some interesting diabetic cases in the last month. Both cases were diagnosed with diabetes at other clinics and found their way to Four Lakes Veterinary Clinic. Generally, the diagnosis of diabetes is pretty straightforward. A dog or cat will be brought to the clinic because it is eating a lot, but losing weight, drinking a lot and possibly having urine accidents in the house, or looks skinny and is having problems walking or jumping. Blood and urine samples are taken to look for possible causes and, if diabetic, the blood glucose will be very high (often above 500, when the normal range is 80-120) and there will be glucose in the urine. If the pet is really sick, there may be ketones in the urine, too. In a diabetic animal, the body isn't producing enough insulin. Insulin is the substance produced by the pancreas (an organ near the stomach) that helps glucose, a simple sugar, get into the cells of the body. Without insulin to "unlock" the door into the cell, the sugar molecules go right by. Now the body thinks it is starving, so it starts breaking down protein and fat to provide the body with glucose. But without insulin, the cells still think they are starving, even though there is now a lot of glucose in the blood stream. Extra glucose is excreted in the urine. So the blood and urine glucose levels from an untreated diabetic animal will be very high. Once we diagnose diabetes, we start the pet on insulin injections. This insulin allows the cells to take in glucose again. Insulin produced by our pancreas is continuous and dependent on how much glucose is circulating in our blood. After a meal, more insulin is released to get the extra glucose into the cells; once the blood glucose level is normal, then no more insulin is released. But with insulin injection Continue reading >>

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Being diagnosed with Type II diabetes can be a bummer, and it can be a struggle to keep blood sugars under control. Sometimes, you may find yourself with blood sugar levels that are higher than normal (let's say around 150, for example), but not excessive enough to necessitate taking more medication. You don't feel very good with the higher blood sugar, but taking medication can make your blood sugar TOO low. So what can you do to lower your blood sugar up to 40 points without taking more medication? Try the following these 13 tips and see if you can lower your blood sugar naturally. (See also: How to Reduce Your Risk of Diabetes) Health Disclaimer: As always, you need to be careful to monitor your sugar levels so as not to become hypoglycemic (that's when your blood sugar is too low, which is dangerous). Talk to your physician before making any changes to your diet. And remember, these 13 tips for lowering blood sugar may work for many people, but they won't work for everyone. Carb Intake Carbs are basically sugar, and everybody should make an effort to control their intake, especially diabetics. 1. Cut Back the Carbs Effects seen: Immediate Your diet is something you want to talk to your physician about, but the simple fact is that a lower carb diet makes it easier to maintain stable blood sugar levels. It's part of why you're hearing so much about the Paleo Diet these days. Carbohydrates are found in starchy foods — root vegetables, grains, rice, and legumes — and all of their derivatives, like bread, pasta, sushi, French fries, mashed yams, and even lentil soup. As someone who has been diabetic for nearly 20 years, I can attest that eating a diet low in carbohydrates, but rich in leafy greens, nuts, dark fruits like berries, and lean meats has had an amazing eff Continue reading >>

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

As a type 2 diabetic, you've probably heard of Metformin, or you might even be taking it yourself. Metformin (brand name “Glucophage” aka “glucose-eater”) is the most commonly prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes worldwide…and for good reason. It is one of the safest, most effective, least costly medication available with minimal, if any, side effects. There are always lots of questions around Metformin – how does metformin lower blood sugar, does metformin promote weight loss or weight gain, will it give me side effects – and lots more. Today we'll hopefully answer some of those questions. How Metformin Works Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as “Biguanides,” which lower blood glucose by decreasing the amount of sugar put out by the liver. The liver normally produces glucose throughout the day in conjunction with the pancreas’ production of insulin to maintain stable blood sugar. In many people with diabetes, both mechanisms are altered in that the pancreas puts out less insulin while the liver is unable to shut down production of excess glucose. This means your body is putting out as much as 3 times as much sugar than that of nondiabetic individuals, resulting in high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Metformin effectively shuts down this excess production resulting in less insulin required. As a result, less sugar is available for absorption by the muscles and conversion to fat. Additionally, a lower need for insulin slows the progression of insulin resistance and keeps cells sensitive to endogenous insulin (that made by the body). Since metformin doesn’t cause the body to generate more insulin, it does not cause hypoglycemia unless combined with a sulfonylurea or insulin injection. Metformin is one of the few oral diabe Continue reading >>

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