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Wheat Glucose Syrup Wheat Allergy

Wheat Allergy | Healthy Eating Advisory Service

Wheat Allergy | Healthy Eating Advisory Service

Wheat is a common cereal grain which forms the basis of many staple foods in Australia such as breads, breakfast cereals, pasta and baked goods. Wheat is also commonly used as the base ingredient for many additives in commercial food products such as thickeners and stabilising agents. Wheat contains a number of different proteins and children who suffer from wheat allergy may have a reaction to one, or a combination, of them. Other grains such as rye, spelt, oats, barley and millet contain similar proteins to wheat and can trigger reactions in people with wheat allergy. These should be avoided by susceptible children unless advised in writing by the childs parents. Corn or maize, rice, buckwheat, potato and soy flours are generally well tolerated by children who are allergic to wheat. A range of wheat free breads, breakfast cereals, flours, pastas and noodles are readily available at local supermarkets and health food stores. Coeliac disease is a lifelong condition where the lining of the small intestine is damaged as a result of exposure to a protein called gluten. This causes a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhoea, bloating, constipation, nausea and vomiting). The only treatment for coeliac disease is strict avoidance of all gluten containing cereals such as wheat, barley, oats and rye. In contrast, people with a wheat allergy may tolerate other grains that contain gluten such as rye and oats. It is also common for children to grow out of a wheat allergy. Products labelled gluten free are suitable to include in a wheat free diet. Allergy action plans are recommended to advise staff what to do if a known allergen is ingested. The action plan should be developed with the childs family and treating team (doctor, allergist, paediatrician) and be approve Continue reading >>

Does Wheat Starch Have Gluten?

Does Wheat Starch Have Gluten?

Close-up of man holding handful of wheat in field.Photo Credit: Digital Vision./Digital Vision/Getty Images Jon Williams is a clinical psychologist and freelance writer. He has performed, presented and published research on a variety of psychological and physical health issues. Gluten is one of the more than one hundred kinds of protein in wheat. The gluten protein has the highly desirable property of elasticity. It is used in many types of baking because it provides the strength and flexibility that allows dough to contain gas and rise. For most, protein in wheat is a good thing. Wheat is a major source of protein for humans across the globe. For those unable to eat gluten due to wheat allergies, wheat intolerance or gluten intolerance, the widespread use of gluten in the food industry forces them to avoid a great many food products. People with wheat allergies have an autoimmune response to wheat and wheat products. Their immune system mistakes wheat molecules as invaders and their white blood cells form protein antibodies that try to neutralize the invaders. Symptoms can occur within a few minutes to several hours and can include nausea, vomiting, hives, watery eyes, eczema, rashes, itching, runny nose, coughing, headaches, swelling of the throat, lips or limbs, difficulty breathing and general aches and pains. Though rare, in severe cases, people can have anaphylactic shock. Those with wheat allergies may respond to the gluten but also may respond to the other non-gluten proteins in wheat products. Celiac disease, also known as gluten intolerance, occurs when the immune system responds to gluten in the digestive tract by attacking the inner lining of the small intestine. The lining of the small intestine becomes inflamed and over time loses its capacity to absorb n Continue reading >>

Wheat Allergy | Young Men's Health

Wheat Allergy | Young Men's Health

A wheat allergy is most common in children and is often outgrown by adulthood, but can be outgrown as early as the age of three. Approximately 65% of children with a wheat allergy will outgrow it by the time they are twelve. Many consider a wheat allergy to be one of the most challenging of the top eight food allergens because so many food products in the United States include wheat. As much as 75% of all grain products are made from wheat flour. All packaged food products sold in the United States that contain wheat as an ingredient must list the word wheat on the label. Be sure to read all product labels carefully before buying and eating, drinking/consuming any item. Also, avoid foods with any of the following ingredients: Flour (all purpose, bread, cake, durum, enriched, graham, high gluten, high protein, instant, pastry, self-rising, soft wheat, steel ground, stone ground, whole wheat) Matzoh, matzoh meal (also spelled matzo, matzah, or matza) Wheat (bran, durum, gluten, grass, malt, sprouts, starch) It is also important to be aware of other ingredients that wheat is sometimes found in, including: Starch (gelatinized starch, modified food starch, vegetable starch) If I have an allergy to wheat, are there any other foods I need to be careful and avoid? It is important to read all ingredient labels carefully as there are many products that surprisingly contain wheat including some brands of ice cream, marinara sauce, potato chips, rice cakes, turkey patties, and hot dogs. Hidden sources of wheat may be found in the following products: Wheat can also be found in some non-food products including play dough and cosmetic and bath products. If I have a wheat allergy, what grains can I safely eat? If you have a wheat allergy, generally you can safely eat non-wheat grains Continue reading >>

Treatment | Wheat Allergy

Treatment | Wheat Allergy

In simple terms, wheat allergy should only require the avoidance of wheat and wheat containing products. However, the possibility of cross-reaction with other cereals and plants must be considered, particularly in the management of an IgE-medicated allergy. Individuals with wheat allergies may also cross-react with grass pollen, rye and barley. Studies looking into the cross-reactivity between wheat, rye and barley, found cross-reactivity in approximately 25% - 55% of individuals with wheat allergy. Even though these cross-reactions do not exists in all cases, it clearly problematic for some [1,2]. Therefore, wheat allergy, patients may be advised to avoid rye and barley in addition to wheat. Wheat can be cross-contaminated with other grains during manufacturing. However, the clinical implications of this for both IgE and non-IgE mediated wheat allergy (apart from celiac disease) is not clear. Due to the ubiquitous use of wheat in many processed and packaged foods, using only naturally wheat free foods may limit both the variety and nutritional adequacy of the diet. Avoiding foods that state may contain traces of wheat is another highly debated point in food allergy. Having to avoid all products containing warnings of may contain may have a financial impact and also affect quality of life. The decision on whether to adopt a more restrictive approach such as this will be based on factors including: Level or degree of wheat avoidance required for non-IgE mediated diseases (FPIES) or those showing a mixed pattern of mechanisms (eczema and EoE) are even less clear. Therefore, an individualized diet plan is recommended. The dietary pattern should be based on history and symptoms of the patient and modified over time as needed. In 2004, the Food Allergen Labelling and Consum Continue reading >>

Wheat-based Dextrin: How Much Gluten Does It Contain?

Wheat-based Dextrin: How Much Gluten Does It Contain?

Wheat-Based Dextrin: How Much Gluten Does it Contain? Individuals with celiac disease have long worried about ingredients that are sometimes (rarely in the US) made from wheat starch, including wheat-based caramel color, wheat-based glucose syrup, wheat-based maltodextrin, and wheat-based dextrin. Under proposed FDA regulations for labeling food gluten free, wheat starch and ingredients made from wheat starch can be included in labeled gluten-free foods as long as the final food product contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten. But what about foods not labeled gluten free that contain these ingredients? For example, if wheat-based maltodextrin is the only suspect ingredient in a food product not labeled gluten free is it okay to eat? While many (and I know not all!) dietitians and people following gluten-free diets have moved the ingredients caramel, glucose syrup, and maltodextrin into the safe column regardless of what they are made from, wheat-based dextrin (in foods not labeled gluten free) remains in the unsafe category. The question is whether this is necessary. Wheat starch is not wheat grain and it is not wheat protein. It is not intended to contain any gluten. Nonetheless it is difficult to completely separate the starch and protein components of wheat and small amounts of gluten remain. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has investigated wheat starch hydrolysates (e.g., wheat-based glucose syrup, wheat-based maltodextrin) as part of its allergen labeling program. According to the EFSA, testing done on wheat starch using the R5 ELISA found gluten in amounts up to 279 ppm. Wheat starch hydrolysates undergo many purification steps designed to remove protein. While wheat starch hydrolysates were found to contain intact gliadin and gluten peptides, Continue reading >>

Wheat Allergy | How To Read A Label To Avoid Wheat

Wheat Allergy | How To Read A Label To Avoid Wheat

There are no good data about how many children have an allergy to wheat. Even so, wheat is a grain that has been reported to trigger allergy symptoms. Children with a wheat allergy must avoid wheat in all forms. Always read the entire ingredient label to look for the names of wheat. Wheat ingredients may be within the list of the ingredients. Or it could be listed in a Contains: Wheat statement beneath the list of ingredients. The federal Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA) requires this. Learn more about the U.S. food allergen labeling law. FALCPA requires that all packaged foods regulated by the FDA must list "wheat" clearly on the ingredient label if it contains wheat. Advisory statements such as may contain wheat or made in a facility with wheat are voluntary. Advisory statements are not required by any federal labeling law. Discuss with your doctor if you may eat products with these labels or if you should avoid them. Did you know that bulgur, malt, and seitan all contain wheat? Wheat may be an added ingredient in flours, baked goods and other products made with alternative grains, such as rice crackers. The FDA food allergen label law requires foods to state if they contain a top 8 allergen such as wheat. But, there are many foods and products that are not covered by the law, so it is still important to know how to read a label for wheat ingredients. Products exempt from plain English labeling rules: (1) Foods that are not regulated by the FDA. (2) Cosmetics and personal care items. (3) Prescription and over-the-counter medications. (4) Toys, crafts and pet food. Download and print our Wheat Allergy Avoidance List and Travel Cards to carry with you and share. The following ingredients found on a label indicate the presence of wheat. All la Continue reading >>

Allergen Labelling Of Wheat-based Products Permanent Exemption

Allergen Labelling Of Wheat-based Products Permanent Exemption

Home / All our issues / Food/feed Law /Allergen labelling of wheat-based products permanent exemption Allergen labelling of wheat-based products permanent exemption Starch Europe 2017-12-15T11:19:04+00:00 November 1st, 2007| Permanent exemption obtained for allergen labelling of wheat-based maltodextrins, glucose syrups, dextrose We are pleased to announce that on the basis of EFSA opinions, on 28 November 2007 the Commission published with Directive 2007/68/EC , the list of food ingredients or substances permanently excluded from allergen labelling. Wheat-based glucose syrups including dextrose, wheat-based maltodextrins and products thereof [1] are included in this list and therefore are permanently exempted from allergen labelling. The Commissions decision indicates that On the basis of the EFSA opinions and other available information, it can be concluded that certain ingredients or substances derived from those ingredients listed in Annex IIIa to Directive 2000/13/EC are not likely, under specific circumstances, to cause adverse reactions in susceptible individuals. This reflects all the scientific work and commitments undertaken by the industry in this dossier consisting of : Code of Good Practice on purification of wheat starch hydrolysates in which the industry commits to respect a maximum 20 ppm gluten/dry substance in the above-mentioned ingredients as a quality parameter; Analytical studies including characterization and quantification of (gluten) proteins in wheat starch hydrolysates; In vivo studies on gluten intolerance and wheat allergy : Evaluation of the safety of wheat starch hydrolysates (glucose syrup, dextrose and maltodextrins) in the context of coeliac disease and Risk of residual allergenicity and clinical reactivity of wheat glucose syrup and m Continue reading >>

Wheat Glucose Syrup Labled Gluten Free? Do U Eat It?

Wheat Glucose Syrup Labled Gluten Free? Do U Eat It?

Gluten-Free Ingredients & Food Labeling Issues Wheat Glucose Syrup Labled Gluten Free? Do U Eat It? Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease 09/30/2015 This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc. Subscribe to Celiac.com'sFREE weekly eNewsletter What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Continue reading >>

Is Coeliac Disease And Wheat Allergy The Same Thing?

Is Coeliac Disease And Wheat Allergy The Same Thing?

Is Coeliac Disease and Wheat Allergy the Same Thing? Home Is Coeliac Disease and Wheat Allergy the Same Thing? A wheat allergy is an adverse reaction involving your immune system to one or more of the protein fractions in wheat. It may occur as a result of ingesting wheat or products containing wheat; or certain occupations (i.e. in bakers) may develop a respiratory condition as a result of inhaling large amounts of unprocessed wheat. Symptoms include gastrointestinal reactions, asthma, eczema or, in rare severe reactions, anaphylaxis. Coeliac disease, on the other hand, is an autoimmune condition in which the immune system mistakenly attacks its own tissues, resulting in damage to the small intestine. It results from ingestion of gluten, one of the proteins found in wheat. The majority of allergic reactions involving wheat are caused by the albumin and globulin fractions of the protein; the gluten fraction only rarely causes an allergic reaction. Wheat allergies are relatively uncommon and are usually outgrown by adulthood. The gluten-free and wheat-free diets are quite similar as both involve the exclusion of wheat from the diet. Coeliacs following the gluten-free diet must also avoid barley and rye. Those with wheat allergies may also react to rye and/or other sources of gluten including barley, oats and rye. Wheat-free diets exclude wheat based products and also products whose ingredients are derived from wheat, e.g. glucose syrup. People following a wheat-free diet must adhere to the same levels of cross-contamination prevention as those following a gluten-free diet. Codex wheat starch is not suitable for consumption by those with a wheat allergy as it is only the gluten content of these foods that is significantly reduced. Legislation states that all ingredients Continue reading >>

Wheat Syrup - Gluten-free Living

Wheat Syrup - Gluten-free Living

Is wheat syrup gluten free? I bought Hero Jam and noticed wheatsyrup on label. Do I have to throw itout? I checked with the company and thewheat syrup is wheat glucose syrup.Here is what our investigation of wheatglucose syrup has found:Glucose syrup is a gluten- free sweetener made most frequently from corn,but also from tapioca, potato, andsorghum or wheat starch. It is such ahighly processed and purified ingredientthat the source of the starch does notmatter. Even if you see glucose syrupderived from wheat on a label, it is stillgluten free.Although GFL did the original reporting on glucose syrup, celiac supportgroups and other gluten- free expertsagree that it is gluten free. You donthave to toss the jam! This answer is 100% incorrect. Why on earth would you go for an amswer to someone who has a vested interest ? The fact is that it depends on the manufacturing process. Not all manufacturing processes remove the gluten. How do you now who answered that question? (Or that they had a vested interest) this response is meant to follow Mike Thomas response. Anyway looks like Im a year late to this discussion as I just saw this ingredient for the first time! I cant seem to find much info on it. It would have to test very low for it to be considered gf. Thats all I know about that. And that I wont eat it anyway. Gf is not enough. Some items are so unhealthy I wouldnt touch them anyway. Why do you want syrup in your jam? Any other than cane anyway? I prefer no sugar added jam if I can afford it. Foods labelled as Gluten Free but containing Glucose Syrup derived from wheat causes allergic reaction in my OH ( who is Coeliac ) Continue reading >>

Gluten-free 101: What You Need To Know

Gluten-free 101: What You Need To Know

You are here: Home Ask the Dietitian Featured Gluten-Free 101: What You Need to Know If youve recently been told you need to follow a gluten-free diet for health reasons, it is very important to completely eliminate gluten from your diet. This is alifestyle change that will take time and practice to become normal. Here are importanttips to get you started, or to refresh your knowledge: Gluten is aprotein found in the grains wheat, barley, rye, and triticale. Gluten iscommonly found in foods like bread, baked goods, crackers, pasta, cereals (though gluten-free versions are widely available). Surprisingly, gluten is also found in caramels, licorice, soy sauce, barbecue sauce and salad dressings. Oats, formerly not recommendedfor those with celiac disease, are actually gluten-free. However,most commercial oats are contaminated with gluten from cross-contact with wheat, barley, or rye during harvesting and processing. Only eat products containing oats if they are labeled gluten-free. Some individuals with celiac disease feel they cannot tolerate oats. Please discusswith your physician or dietitian if you experience symptoms when eating oats. Read more on sources of gluten and gluten-free foods . Step 1: Look for the words gluten-free on package labels. The FDA does not require gluten-free food packages to displaya gluten-free symbol or trademark, only the words gluten-free. Avoid products labeled No gluten-containing ingredients. Companies may use this term when they do not test for the presence of gluten in their product. Even if a product uses no gluten-containing ingredients, gluten may be in the final product from cross-contact with other products or ingredients during manufacturing. Step 2: Read the product ingredients list, especially if the productis not labeled glu Continue reading >>

Is Glucose Syrup Gluten-free?

Is Glucose Syrup Gluten-free?

Glucose syrup is a liquid sweetener used in candy, desserts and that ice cream in the picture. It can made from any starch. In the United States, corn is used, but in Europe it is usually derived from wheat. One would assume that the wheat-based glucose contains gluten, but in fact, glucose syrup made from wheat starch is considered gluten-free. I confirmed this with Shelley Case, the go-to gluten-free dietician and author of Gluten Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide . In an email to me she said: Glucose syrup can be derived from a variety of starches including wheat. Corn is the most common however Europe uses wheat more frequently. The glucose syrups are highly processed and purified and R5 elisa tests have found the majority to contain very little residual gluten if any. The European Food Safety put out a report on the safety of glucose syrups. Here is the link for more info: Based on the FDA proposed gluten-free labeling regulation a product can be derived from a gluten-containing grain such as wheat based glucose syrup and be labeled gluten-free yet the ingredients could say glucose syrup (wheat) provided it is under 20 parts per million (ppm). This will be very confusing for patients as we teach them to avoid wheat and yet a product like glucose syrup may have no or very little residual gluten and be labeled gluten free. And just this month, a new gluten-free study from Finland was released. In the study they determined that it was safe for celiac patients to consume glucose syrup and other starch hydrolysates derived from wheat. Here is the summary of the report: Background: Wheat-based starch hydrolysates such as glucose syrups, dextrose and maltodextrins are found in more than 50% of European processed food. These products contain low amounts of residua Continue reading >>

Top 10 Ingredients You Really Dont Need To Worry About

Top 10 Ingredients You Really Dont Need To Worry About

> Top 10 Ingredients You Really Dont Need to Worry About Top 10 Ingredients You Really Dont Need to Worry About Lets face it, the gluten-free diet is complex and difficult to maneuver. Add to this the issue of common ingredients thatnever seem to get off lengthy lists of things to question and its no wonder that so many people doing their best to avoid gluten are still assailed by confusion and anxiety. Thats why we think it sometimes makes more sense to explain why you dont have to worry about certain ingredients.Here are the leading ingredients that you can stop worrying about. Why its on worry lists in the first place: The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) says caramel color can be made from malt syrup or starch hydrolysates, either of which could contain gluten. Why you dont need to worry: Despite what the CFR says, companies typically use corn to produce caramel color, rather than wheat. Underthe Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, a products label must indicate if wheat is used in caramel coloring. Why thats a good thing: Caramel color is in a lot of products, including carbonated and alcoholic beverages, baked goods and sauces. Why its on worry lists in the first place:While citric acid is usually made from corn, beet sugar or molasses, it can also be made from wheat. Why you dont have to worry: Citric acid is highly processed and purified. The steps that bring it to this point fully remove any gluten proteins. Why thats a good thing: Its one less ingredient to worry about and its a fairly common ingredient used in products such as canned goods and soft drinks. Why its on worry lists in the first place: Dextrose can be made from wheat. In fact, sometimes it is. Why you dont have to worry: Like citric acid, dextrose is a highly processed ingredien Continue reading >>

Food Labels - Coeliac Uk

Food Labels - Coeliac Uk

When shopping for food you can find lots of information on the label to help you decide whether a food is suitable for your gluten free diet. There is a law that covers the use of the labelling term gluten free . When you see gluten free on a label, you know these foods are suitable on a gluten free diet. The term gluten free can only be used on foods which contain 20 parts per million (ppm) or less of gluten . You might see this on specialist substitute products like breads, flour and crackers, which may contain gluten free (Codex) wheat starch, as well as processed foods made from naturally gluten free ingredients such as soups, sausages and ready meals. Uncontaminated oat products can also be labelled gluten free. On gluten free foods you may also see the term suitable for coeliacs. All packaged foods in the UK and the EU are covered by labelling laws which include rules around the allergen information that has to be provided on the label. The requirements of the Food Information Regulations mean that you can tell from a label whether a product contains a gluten containing ingredient or not. All deliberate ingredients must be listed in the ingredients list. Gluten containing cereals are one of the 14 listed allergens that must be emphasised in the ingredients list, therefore if a cereal containing gluten is used as an ingredient, it must be listed and clearly emphasised, for example in bold lettering, in the ingredients list, no matter how little of it is used. Manufacturers will name the specific grain used, so you will see these words on the ingredients list if they are in the product: Read more about the Food Information Regulation. There are some ingredients which are made from a cereal containing gluten where the grain is processed in such a way that the gluten Continue reading >>

Is Wheat Glucose Suitable For Coeliacs?

Is Wheat Glucose Suitable For Coeliacs?

Just bought my usual fruit fool from waitrose, had a mouthful and spotted the words 'wheat glucose' on the ingredients list. Doesn't show gluten as an allergen in the separate allergen box. Just looked on their website says the product is suitable for those avoiding gluten! I noticed before xmas that a lot of the ham products I wanted to buy also had wheat glucose on the ingredients list so I didn't buy them. Is this supermarket a bit more switched on than others with their labelling or should all products with glucose in state the origin of the glucose? Perhaps someone could shed some light on this please. Personally I would avoid it. I take the view that not all icecream is gluten free and it usually is the once that contain wheat glucose that state that they are not gluten free. I don't eat much icecream so it is not a problem but I do avoid products that contain wheat glucose just in case, although Coeliac UK state that they are safe owing to the minute amount of gluten that is left after processing. I think it is a case of personal choice. Hi Jan, I too would avoid anything that is derived from wheat, barley, oats or rye. In truth, syrups made from these four gluten grains will most probably only contain up to 20ppm of gluten once they have been processed and for those in Australia and New Zealand this will be as little as up to 5ppm. Continue reading >>

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