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What Triggers Reactive Hypoglycemia?

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes the sugar (glucose) in your blood to drop too low. This can happen in people who do not have diabetes. The 2 types of non-diabetic hypoglycemia are fasting hypoglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia often happens after the person goes without food for 8 hours or longer. Reactive hypoglycemia usually happens about 2 to 4 hours after a meal. When your blood sugar level is low, your muscles and brain cells do not have enough energy to work well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Fasting hypoglycemia: Certain medicines or herbal supplements such as fenugreek, ginseng, or cinnamon Alcohol Exercise Medical conditions such as liver disease, hypothyroidism, and tumors Eating disorders or malnutrition Stomach surgery or hemodialysis Reactive hypoglycemia: The causes of reactive hypoglycemia may be unknown. Hyperinsulinism Meals high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread or foods high in sugar Prediabetes Any surgery of the digestive system What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Blurred vision or changes in vision Dizziness, lightheadedness, or shakiness Fatigue and weakness Fast or pounding heartbeat Sweating more than usual Headache Nausea or hunger Anxiety, Irritability, or confusion How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed? Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. After you have fasted overnight, your blood sugar levels will be tested 2 times. For a 72-hour fasting test, you will not be given food for a period of up to 72 hours. During th Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia After Eating (reactive, Postprandial) Causes, Symptoms, Diet

Hypoglycemia After Eating (reactive, Postprandial) Causes, Symptoms, Diet

The intake of sufficient food ensures that our body has enough nutrition to sustain us for several hours. Even if a meal is missed, the body should be able to maintain adequate glucose levels to continue function at suitable levels. In fact the body maintains the glucose levels within a certain range, and even missing one or two meals would not cause these levels to drop below a certain point in a healthy person. When the blood glucose levels does drop below a minimum limit, it can affect proper physical and mental functioning. What is reactive hypoglycemia? Reactive hypoglycemia is also known as postprandial hypoglycemia. Postprandial means after eating while hypoglycemia means low blood glucose levels. Therefore postprandial hypoglycemia is where the blood glucose levels drop after eating. It is a result of an abnormality in insulin secretion and regulation. Overall hypoglycemia is not as common a condition as is often thought, and reactive (postprandial) hypoglycemia is even less common. Symptoms that are typical of hypoglycemia like dizziness, shakiness, anxiety, hunger, nausea and irritability occur. In reactive hypoglycemia this occurs approximately 4 hours after a meal. This does not usually lead to a loss of consciousness but severe hypoglycemia, particularly in diabetics should be considered a medical emergency. However, a person may be unable to function properly in tasks that they are undertaking and need to eat/drink something and rest till the glucose levels stabilize. With reactive hypoglycemia, this is a result of eating contrary to the lack of food as is seen in fasting hypoglycemia. Reasons for Reactive Hypoglycemia The healthy body can maintain glucose levels within a narrow range. Even if you eat very sweet foods, your blood glucose level will not exc Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin’s job is to help glucose enter your cells where it’s used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Types of nondiabetic hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as salicylates (such as aspirin), sulfa drugs (an antibiotic), pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia), quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, especially with binge drinking Serious illnesses, such as those affecting the liver, heart, or kidneys Low levels of certain hormones, such as cortisol, growth hormone, glu Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Definition Reactive hypoglycemia is characterized by recurrent episodes of symptomatic hypoglycemia that occur within 2-4 hours after ingesting a high carbohydrate meal. The condition is believed to be a consequence of excessive insulin release triggered by glucose overload that persist even after the glucose from the meal has been digested or disposed by the body. Literally, hypoglycemia is low blood sugar. Most forms of hypoglycemia occur while fasting. However, reactive hypoglycemia is one that occurs right after eating a meal. Diagnosis Diagnosing reactive hypoglycemia can prove very difficult. Patients exhibiting symptoms similar to reactive hypoglycemia may not actually have the condition. Diagnosis is focused on confirming that the symptoms are caused by low blood sugar and that these symptoms are alleviated once blood sugar levels return to normal. Symptoms and Signs Symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia vary depending on the patient's sensitivity to fluctuations (i.e. rapid elevation and decline) of glucose levels in the body. Common symptoms include dizziness, fatigue, headaches, light-headedness, sweating, palpitations, nervousness, depression, irritability, flushing, tremors, increased appetite, increased craving for sweets, rhinitis, and even epileptic-type response to rapidly flashing lights. Causes To date, the cause of reactive hypoglycemia is not clear. Recent studies indicate that some individuals may be overly sensitive to the normal release of epinephrine, a hormone which triggers hypoglycemic symptoms. Meanwhile, other researchers believe that reactive hypoglycemia results from a deficiency in glucagons, a hormone that normally protects the body against low levels of blood sugar. Less commonly, reactive hypoglycemia may occur as a consequence of an over Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Definition The condition called hypoglycemia is literally translated as low blood sugar. Hypoglycemia occurs when blood sugar (or blood glucose) concentrations fall below a level necessary to properly support the body's need for energy and stability throughout its cells. Description Carbohydrates are the main dietary source of the glucose that is manufactured in the liver and absorbed into the bloodstream to fuel the body's cells and organs. Glucose concentration is controlled by hormones, primarily insulin and glucagon. Glucose concentration also is controlled by epinephrine (adrenalin) and norepinephrine, as well as growth hormone. If these regulators are not working properly, levels of blood sugar can become either excessive (as in hyperglycemia) or inadequate (as in hypoglycemia). If a person has a blood sugar level of 50 mg/dl or less, he or she is considered hypoglycemic, although glucose levels vary widely from one person to another. Hypoglycemia can occur in several ways. Drug-induced hypoglycemia Drug-induced hypoglycemia, a complication of diabetes, is the most commonly seen and most dangerous form of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia occurs most often in diabetics who must inject insulin periodically to lower their blood sugar. While other diabetics also are vulnerable to low blood sugar episodes, they have a lower risk of a serious outcome than insulin-dependant diabetics. Unless recognized and treated immediately, severe hypoglycemia in the insulin-dependent diabetic can lead to generalized convulsions followed by amnesia and unconsciousness. Death, though rare, is a possible outcome. In insulin-dependent diabetics, hypoglycemia known as an insulin reaction or insulin shock can be caused by several factors. These include overmedicating with manufactured insulin, m Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

The Facts Hypoglycemia occurs when the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood is too low. Normally, your body keeps your blood glucose within a concentration range of 4.0 mmol/L to 8.0 mmol/L (about 70 mg/dL to 140 mg/dL). In order to do this, the body has mechanisms that involve the hormone insulin, which is made by the pancreas, as well as several other hormones. When blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas responds by releasing insulin to encourage the movement of glucose from the bloodstream to the cells. Insulin lowers the amount of glucose in your blood by signalling the cells in the body to use the glucose as fuel. Your body uses glucose as its main fuel. The brain requires a constant supply of blood glucose and will signal the adrenal glands to release two hormones called adrenaline and cortisol whenever blood glucose levels are low. The adrenaline and cortisol then signal the liver to convert the carbohydrates it stores (from the foods we eat) into glucose and release it into the bloodstream. The pancreas is also involved in raising blood glucose levels if they fall too low. When blood sugar is low, the pancreas releases the hormone glucagon, which increases blood sugar by signalling the liver to convert stored carbohydrates into glucose and to create new glucose molecules from other substances (such as amino acids) in the liver. If these mechanisms don't work properly, the blood glucose remains too low and the brain won't be able to function normally. Causes Hypoglycemia can be caused by medications. Medication-related hypoglycemia occurs most commonly in people who have diabetes, especially type 1 diabetes (a type of diabetes where the pancreas does not make insulin). In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes it can occur when someone is given too much insulin or other Continue reading >>

Does Your Pancreas Overreact After Meals?

Does Your Pancreas Overreact After Meals?

Reactive hypoglycemia is a condition with recurring episodes of hypoglycemia in a person who is not diabetic. True reactive hypoglycemia symptoms are caused by low blood glucose ranges, usually less than 70 mg/dL, and occur after eating a meal. For the majority of people with postprandial symptoms, the actual cause of the symptoms is not clear, but may relate to what food was eaten or variations in the timing of the food moving through the stomach and intestinal tract. Reactive hypoglycemia is the result of excessive insulin release triggered by the intake of carbohydrates, but the insulin release continues past the digestion phase, and past disposal of glucose from that past meal. People who've had intestinal surgery (gastric bypass or surgery for the management of ulcer disease) or tumors in the pancreas may have an increased production of insulin that puts them at a higher risk of having reactive hypoglycemia because of the rapid passage of food into the small intestine. Rare enzyme deficiencies diagnosed early in life, such as hereditary fructose intolerance, also may cause reactive hypoglycemia. Other causes include: 1. Certain medicines 2. Drinking alcohol, especially drinking a lot over a few days 3. Certain illnesses that affect the liver or kidneys 4. Anorexia nervosa, an eating disorder that makes people lose more weight than is healthy. 5. Growths or problems in the pancreas DIAGNOSIS The doctor may ask about signs and symptoms to diagnosis reactive hypoglycemia: •Test blood glucose while the patient is having symptoms by taking a blood sample from the arm and sending it to a laboratory for analysis. •Check to see whether the symptoms ease after the patient's blood glucose returns to 70 mg/dL or above after eating or drinking. •A blood glucose level bel Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Warning: Hypoglycemia Vs Diabetes

Prediabetes Warning: Hypoglycemia Vs Diabetes

A prediabetes warning can be characterized by low blood sugar symptoms like fatigue, weakness, tiredness, and more. This phenomenon, despite how common it is, is not normal, nor is it healthy. It’s the classic sign of what is known as reactive hypoglycemia and an early symptom of the prediabetes-related condition known as insulin resistance. Refined Carbs Can Cause Wild Mood Swings If you eat a meal loaded with sugar and refined carbs, you will experience wild swings in blood sugar that make you feel tired, anxious, irritable, and hungry for more quickly absorbed sugars. When you repeat this process day in and day out, eating a diet full of empty calories, refined carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes), sugars, and sweetened beverages (sodas, juices, sports drinks), your cells start to become resistant or numb to insulin. You end up needing more and more insulin to keep your blood sugars down. This is insulin resistance, a pre-diabetic condition that has become an epidemic. What is Reactive Hypoglycemia? Reactive hypoglycemia is characterized by low blood sugar symptoms like fatigue, weakness, tiredness, dizziness, sweating, shakiness, palpitations, anxiety, nausea, a sensation of hunger, and difficulty with concentration which occur after eating an abundance of sugar or refined carbs. These reactive hypoglycemia symptoms occur in the early stages of insulin resistance. Take a typical breakfast these days: swigging a large sweetened coffee drink and grabbing something from the Starbucks pastry case will give you a big energy surge as your sugar and insulin levels spike. What follows, however, are inevitable sugar crash symptoms as your blood sugar plummets. With this comes the low blood sugar fatigue. Insulin Levels May Be the First Sign That Something is Wrong Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Definition Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by low blood sugar, or abnormally low levels of glucose in the blood. Description Hypoglycemia (also known as a hypo, insulin shock, and a low) is brought on by abnormally low levels of glucose in the blood (i.e., 70 mg/dl or less). The condition is common among children with type 1 diabetes, but may also occur less frequently in children or teens with type 2 diabetes who are taking a sulfonylurea drug. An inadequate diet, improperly calculated insulin dose, minor illnesses, or excessive activity without adequate sustenance can contribute to the condition. If unchecked, hypoglycemia can lead to unconsciousness. In very rare cases, the victim may suffer a seizure. A hypoglycemic child will appear irritable, sweaty, shaky, and confused and may complain of being very hungry. In most cases, a snack of quick-acting carbohydrates (e.g., juice or hard candy) will remedy the situation. Glucose tablets or gel can also be taken. A child who has lost consciousness due to hypoglycemia may require a glucagon shot to return blood sugar levels to normal. Newborns of women with gestational, type 1, or type 2 diabetes during pregnancy may also experience hypoglycemia at birth, particularly if the mother's blood glucose levels were not well controlled in late pregnancy. High levels of maternal glucose cause the fetus to generate equally high levels of insulin to handle the over-load, and when the maternal glucose source is disconnected at birth with the cutting of the umbilical cord, all of that insulin causes the newborn's blood sugar levels to plummet. Intravenous administration of a glucose solution to the newborn can help re-establish normal blood sugar levels. A rare type of hypoglycemia, known as reactive hypoglycemia, may occur Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive hypoglycemia, postprandial hypoglycemia, or sugar crash is a term describing recurrent episodes of symptomatic hypoglycemia occurring within 4 hours[1] after a high carbohydrate meal in people who do not have diabetes.[2] The condition is related to homeostatic systems utilised by the body to control blood sugar levels. It is variously described as a sense of tiredness, lethargy, irritation, or hangover, although the effects can be less if one has undertaken a lot of physical activity within the next few hours after consumption. The alleged mechanism for the feeling of a crash is correlated with an abnormally rapid rise in blood glucose after eating. This normally leads to insulin secretion (known as an insulin spike), which in turn initiates rapid glucose uptake by tissues either accumulating it as glycogen or utilizing it for energy production. The consequent fall in blood glucose is indicated as the reason for the "sugar crash".[3]. A deeper cause might be hysteresis effect of insulin action, i.e., the effect of insulin is still prominent even if both plasma glucose and insulin levels were already low, causing a plasma glucose level eventually much lower than the baseline level[4]. Sugar crashes are not to be confused with the after-effects of consuming large amounts of protein, which produces fatigue akin to a sugar crash, but are instead the result of the body prioritising the digestion of ingested food.[5] The prevalence of this condition is difficult to ascertain because a number of stricter or looser definitions have been used. It is recommended that the term reactive hypoglycemia be reserved for the pattern of postprandial hypoglycemia which meets the Whipple criteria (symptoms correspond to measurably low glucose and are relieved by raising the glucos Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia Post–gastric Bypass

Reactive Hypoglycemia Post–gastric Bypass

Reactive hypoglycemia (RH) may occur in patients one year or more after their bariatric surgery. Symptoms include shakiness, hunger, dizziness, cold sweats, confusion, anxiety and possible loss of consciousness. The further out from surgery you are, the more tuned in to your body and reactions to food you become. Definition: RH is low blood sugar typically 1.5 to 3 hours following a meal. You probably will begin to recognize the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar. This is not related to a diabetes insulin reaction or even a former diagnosis of diabetes prior to surgery. RH is simply a side effect of gastric bypass that happens in a minority of patients. Pre-surgery excess weight leads to excess insulin production and insulin resistance. Additionally, the bypass surgery leads to certain hormone level increases that also increase insulin production. After surgery, patients become more sensitive to insulin, more rapidly clearing sugars from the blood stream and this is why low blood sugars, or RH, can occur. Treatment: The way to treat symptoms is based on how severe they are. If it is time for the next meal, simply eat your normal meal. If you begin to feel like you are having a somewhat low blood sugar—a little weakness and shakiness—and it is not time for a meal, simply have a small carbohydrate (5g) choice with a small protein food, for example, five crackers with a string cheese, 1 lite Greek yogurt or a half piece of toast with peanut butter. On the other hand, if you have more serious symptoms such as nearly fainting and sweating profusely then it is time for a quick sugar hit. Have 4–6 ounces of regular juice or two glucose tablets as a rescue dose of glucose. Be cautious as this may lead to another low later on as your body processes this dose of sugar. I Continue reading >>

Appointments At Mayo Clinic

Appointments At Mayo Clinic

I think I have reactive hypoglycemia. How can I address my symptoms? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Reactive hypoglycemia (postprandial hypoglycemia) refers to low blood sugar that occurs after a meal — usually within four hours after eating. This is different from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) that occurs while fasting. Signs and symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia may include hunger, weakness, shakiness, sleepiness, sweating, lightheadedness and anxiety. It's possible to have symptoms that are similar to reactive hypoglycemia without actually having low blood sugar. True reactive hypoglycemia symptoms that are caused by low blood sugar occurring after eating are uncommon. For the majority of people with postprandial symptoms, the actual cause of the symptoms is not clear but may relate to what food was eaten or variations in the timing of the food moving through the stomach and intestinal tract. Generally, a medical evaluation is done to determine whether symptoms are caused by low blood sugar — and whether symptoms resolve once blood sugar returns to normal. Further evaluation of reactive hypoglycemia depends on the severity of symptoms. For the majority of people, reactive hypoglycemia usually doesn't require medical treatment. It may help, however, to pay attention to the timing and composition of your meals: Eat a well-balanced diet, including lean and nonmeat sources of protein, and high-fiber foods, including whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Avoid sugary foods, especially on an empty stomach. Be sure to eat food if you're consuming alcohol, and avoid using sugary soft drinks as mixers. Eat several small meals and snacks throughout the day, no more than three hours apart during the waking hours. Most people will try to find out what dietary changes ar Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia And Eating Too Much Sugar

Reactive Hypoglycemia And Eating Too Much Sugar

Reactive hypoglycemia is low blood sugar that occurs after eating. Reactive hypoglycemia usually occurs 1 to 3 hours after you eat food high in sugar, or food with a high-glycemic index. After eating these foods, your blood sugar level fluctuates by elevating too high and then dropping down too low. Reactive hypoglycemia is possibly the most common reason for hypoglycemia in non-diabetics, according to NetDoctor.com.uk. Video of the Day Normal blood sugar should range from 80 to 100 mg/dL. Low blood sugar occurs when your blood glucose drops below 70 mg/dL. The hormone insulin helps maintain your blood glucose. After you eat, your blood sugar increases and your body secretes insulin to bring your blood sugar back to normal. Type 1 diabetics need to inject insulin, as their bodies do not make any. Type 2 diabetics may still produce insulin, but either not enough, or their bodies don't respond to it properly. They often need medication to bring their blood sugar levels down. The glycemic index is a measurement used to rank how fast and how high a particular food can raise blood sugar. Carbohydrate foods with a high glycemic index are more likely to cause reactive hypoglycemia. To avoid reactive hypoglycemia, eat foods with a glycemic index below 55. High glycemic index foods include sugar, dates, potatoes, pumpkin, white rice, many cereals, white bread and some crackers. Foods that have a lower glycemic index are nuts, pasta, yams, chickpeas, kidney beans, lentils, soy beans, unsweetened dairy products and most other vegetables. Low-glycemic index fruits are apples, pears and plums. If you are going to eat foods with a high glycemic index, only eat them with a properly balanced meal to help keep your blood sugar steady. Avoid eating sugary foods before bedtime, or when yo Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia - Hypos After Eating

Reactive Hypoglycemia - Hypos After Eating

Tweet Reactive hypoglycemia is the general term for having a hypo after eating, which is when blood glucose levels become dangerously low following a meal. Also known as postprandial hypoglycemia, drops in blood sugar are usually recurrent and occur within four hours after eating. Reactive hypoglycemia can occur in both people with and without diabetes, and is thought to be more common in overweight individuals or those who have had gastric bypass surgery. What are the causes of reactive hypoglycemia? Scientists believe reactive hypoglycemia to be the result of too much insulin being produced and released by the pancreas following a large carbohydrate-based meal. This excess insulin production and secretion continues after the glucose derived from the meal has been digested, causing the amount of glucose in the bloodstream to fall to a lower-than-normal level. What causes this increase in pancreatic activity is unclear. One possible explanation is that in rare cases, a benign (non-cancerous) tumour in the pancreas may cause an overproduction of insulin, or too much glucose may be used up by the tumour itself. Another is that reactive hypoglycemia is caused by deficiencies in glucagon secretion. In the U.S. the National Institutes of Health (NIH) states that "the causes of most cases of reactive hypoglycemia are still open to debate". Signs and symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia Symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia can include: Anxiety Blurred vision Confusion Fatigue Headaches Heart palpitations Increased hunger Irritability Light-headedness Sleeping problems Sweating Weakness When talking about the signs of reactive hypoglycemia, it's important to note that many of these symptoms can be experienced without actually having low blood sugar. In fact, it is rare for such sympt Continue reading >>

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